77 gl1000 overheating problem


Information and questions on GL1000 Goldwings (1975-1979)
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dennisg10a
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77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby dennisg10a » Wed Jul 13, 2011 6:34 pm



my 77 overheats when I drive it on the highway. I checked the fan, it's coming on, checked coolant, plenty. Could this be something simple or do you think it's internal. Someone said to check the water pump.How? Any thoughts will be appreciated. Thanks, Dennis G



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N2PPN
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby N2PPN » Wed Jul 13, 2011 7:52 pm

Stuck Thermostat??

Only way to check the water pump is to decide to change it.... you could try to watch through the radiator neck to see if coolant is "moving" through the radiator when bike is at operating temp, but that might not give any real indication...

Unfortunately your best bet is to do the water pump, thermostat and while your at it, flush out the radiator (or bring the radiator to a radiator shop to have it boiled out and pressure checked)and replace the radiator hoses...

Since you didn't say if you were losing any coolant, I would assume your radiator cap is OK (a bad cap will allow engine to overheat, but would show up as a leaker)...

Hope this helps...


Rich
Don't Worry,
Ride Happy!

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virgilmobile
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby virgilmobile » Wed Jul 13, 2011 8:57 pm

Getting warm on the interstate indicates the coolant is not being cooled enough.Sounds simple enough,but a lot of things come into play.
1st.Does it have a new(or verified) thermostat in it?I've seen them left out.
The thermostat can slow the coolant flow to allow the radiator to cool it.
2nd.Is there enough coolant?An air lock can create hot spots and poor flow.
3rd.Pull the cover and inspect the impeller of the water pump,Broken parts?Loose bearings?
4th.Is the radiator full of bugs?It needs to flow air completely.

All this and more.Look at the easy stuff first.

dennisg10a
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby dennisg10a » Thu Jul 14, 2011 5:38 am

Thanks, I will check all your ideas and get back to you. Don't knnow about thermostat but radiator is clean, cap is tight, and the coolant is full, so I'll have to check thermostat and air lock first. Hope that's all. Thanks again, Dennis G.

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detdrbuzzard
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby detdrbuzzard » Thu Jul 14, 2011 6:36 am

are the air wing ( or what ever they are called ) on the sides of the radiator
'99 ST1100, '93 se
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virgilmobile
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby virgilmobile » Thu Jul 14, 2011 7:13 am

Oh,by the way,if your fan is coming on at highway speeds it means ONLY that the thermo-switch has reached at least 195 degrees and nothing more.Unless your absolutely sure about the thermostat,get a new one and replace it and replace the coolant.Use non-silica type.

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Fred Camper
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby Fred Camper » Thu Jul 14, 2011 9:12 pm

Always helps if you tell us how you know it overheats. Is she puking out coolant, or do you think you are too high on the temp gauge? Good advice on the thermostat, that is first. You do not need radiator baffles or wings to cool properly unless the ambient is over 100 F.

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scotterichmond
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby scotterichmond » Fri Jul 15, 2011 9:52 am

There is no substitute for an accurate hand held themometer

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N2PPN
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby N2PPN » Fri Jul 15, 2011 9:59 am

Can you gain access to a non-contact Infra Red thermometer? They have come down in price a lot since they first were introduced... For overheating and quick temperature measurements they really can't be beat..

When you are riding and notice the bike starting to overheat, pull over and "shoot" the non-contact thermometer at the radiator, and as many places on the engine as you can...

Since the heads are water cooled, you should be able to get an idea of engine temperature by seeing how hot each head is, also shoot the oil filter cover as the engine oil will also give you a good idea of how hot the engine is... while down there you should shoot the water pump cover and the lower radiator hose outlet and top of radiator (if not too blocked by grille or accessories), this will tell you the temperature of the coolant going INTO the engine from the radiator, if it is reading way too hot, this would confirm your overheating suspicions. (if you can get a reading from the upper radiator hose this will be the best indicator of engine temp as the upper radiator hose comes from the engine through the thermostat.

The thermostat is set to open at 160 degrees Fahrenheit, so expect to see about 180 or so after a highway run for five or ten miles long in ambient temperatures of about 85 degrees or so. Temperature may go up rather quickly as soon as you pull off the road so make readings quickly and do a couple of them in a row to see if it is increasing due to lack of airflow through radiator.

One last thing, if your coolant is not mixed in the correct dilution (50/50 with distilled water) it can actually cause overheating.... a solution of greater than 60/40 antifreeze to distilled water doesn't absorb heat as efficiently as one at 50/50... a common mistake and cause of overheating is running nearly straight antifreeze in a cooling system. A cheap $3.00 antifreeze tester will determine if dilution is correct.

Just more spare change from my brain....

Post back and let us know what you find....


Rich
Don't Worry,
Ride Happy!

tchodge
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby tchodge » Sat Jul 16, 2011 2:30 pm

hi ,just had the same proble a couple of weeks ago,went 10 miles and it started to overheat and boil ,had to drain the coolant off ,iff you do this take the pump cover off and manualy atempt to turn the pump (should not happen)i also run my wing with no thermostat,try moving it,do you need it in the usa? ,a few years ago mine was a bropken pump drive shaft,but recently all it was ,was a air blockage , fill the radiator ,run it on the stand and fill if required,
hpoe this is a help,tony

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virgilmobile
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby virgilmobile » Sat Jul 16, 2011 3:45 pm

Granted that many things can cause overheating on a wing at highway speed.
The use of a thermostat is not just for the USA.It is an engineering design requirement to accommodate a wide range of operating conditions.We here in this country can experience riding conditions from 25 degrees below zero to 114 degrees above zero.

The thermostat is needed by the cooling system to control coolant flow through the engine and radiator to maintain optimum operating temperature .

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N2PPN
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Re: 77 gl1000 overheating problem

Postby N2PPN » Sat Jul 16, 2011 7:49 pm

Besides providing a flow restriction, it also keeps the pump from cavitating and foaming up the coolant by slowing down the coolant flow from the engine out to the radiator. By causing this systemic "backpressure" it keeps a more positive pump pressure on the outlet side of the pump and actually increases coolant flow through the engine.

If the engineers who designed these engines thought it a good idea to place a thermostat in the coolant system, who are we to remove it??

Besides keeping the engine oil at an optimal temperature to remove moisture build up and other contaminants that will vaporize at operating temperatures, it allows the engine to reach optimal temperature for efficient combustion.

Bottom line is unless you can re-engineer the cooling system and it's components to operate better than originally designed, just don't do it.


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Rich


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