Winter maintenance log


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:19 pm



My winter maintenance plan this year was pretty simple:

- Add some LED lights
- Add some noise filtering to the audio circuitry
- Replace the tires
- Adjust the valves

And that was it. I started late as usual, pulling my bike out last weekend to put the new tires on. The tires I selected to replace my worn out Dunlops were a set of Avon Venoms. The best price I found on the Internet was, surprisingly, at Rocky Mountain ATV MC which is an off-road ATV/dirt bike store. The front 120/90H-18 (71H) Avon Venom AM41 was $107, and the rear 140/90HB-16 (77H) Avon Venom AM42 was $127.99 - quite a bit cheaper than I found anywhere else. And shipping was free - plus I was given a $10 discount, so I ended up paying $225.98 for both tires. An excellent price!

I also ordered a Dyna Beads Starter Kit, for $13.99. After hearing a lot of great reviews about Dyna Beads, I decided to try them. Instead of using lead weights on your wheels, you put these little ceramic beads into the tires, and they move around and adjust the weight dynamically - throughout the life of the tire. It apparently makes the ride much smoother, and extends tire life significantly. This kit contains two 2 oz packets of beads, one for each tire - the correct size for my Goldwing.

With the free shipping, the web site said to expect my order within 5-7 days, which is reasonable. I placed the order at 3 pm. Imagine my utter surprise when at 10:00 the next morning, a pair of brand new motorcycle tires was delivered to my house! No explanation, just "here's the tires you ordered." I wasn't about to complain. Wow!

This is the first time I had a chance to use my new motorcycle lift, and I must say, I love it! I don't know how I managed to work on this bike before without it.

I have a Harbor Freight Bead Breaker, and a set of three of their tire irons, so I pulled the front wheel off my bike, deflated it, and set to work removing the tire. Once I had the old tire off, I cleaned the rim, installed a new valve, and mounted the new tire, first checking to make sure I had the directional tire mounted correctly. My compressor just doesn't have the capacity to seat the beads on tires, so I took it to the local Firestone around the corner, where they are happy to seat the beads on wheels at no charge. I brought the tire home, and set it into place under the front forks. Something didn't look right on the tread. I looked at it, then looked at the sidewall - and realized that I had mounted the damn tire backwards! I said some Very Bad Words, deflated the tire, took it off the rim, turned it around, checked three or four times to make sure I had it right, and re-mounted it. My head hanging, I went back to Firestone to have them seat the bead for me, explaining why I was back with the same tire again. They just laughed and said it happens to everyone. :)

After I had the front tire reinstalled, I installed the Dyna Beads, which was a simple procedure that took all of five minutes. Next, I went to put the brake caliper in place - and had a quick look at the brake pads. Expecting them to be in fairly good shape, as they only had 5,000 miles on them, I was shocked to see that they had about 20% lining remaining. I know I did a lot of hard riding last year, but I wasn't expecting to see that. Add new front brakes to the list.

On to the rear wheel. I pulled the side bags off to gain access to the rear drive and axle. I did not like what I saw. The rubber boot of my left rear shock was covered in shock oil. A blown shock. We'll get to that in a bit.

I pulled the rear wheel off, and had a quick glance at the condition of the rear brakes. I almost fell over - there was virtually no lining left whatsoever, it was almost right down to metal on metal. I know neither my front nor rear wheel was dragging, and there's no discoloration or indication of heat on the rotors, so I can only attribute this to aggressive riding. That said, I'm going to re-examine my brakes to ensure they are releasing correctly.

I deflated the tire, removed it, cleaned the rim, installed a new valve, mounted the new tire, and headed back to Firestone. Once it was seated and ready to be reinstalled, I put a fresh coating of Moly Paste on the spline drive, greased my driveline, and put it all back together. Some Dyna Beads installed, and it's ready to go.

Next, I was on to the shocks. I removed the air line from the left (blown) shock, but wondered why it was different from the right shock? I had a closer look, and to my utter surprise, realized that my left rear shock was an OEM Honda air shock, but my right rear shock was a Progressive 416 air shock. Some previous owner had put two different shocks on my bike! Visions of a simple shock seal rebuild flew out of my head. I was going to have to buy a new shock - I didn't want two different shocks on my bike.

A quick inspection showed that the stud used to mount the shock is also used to mount the rear crash bar, and the rear trunk frame - quite a bit was going to have to come off. I removed the trunk, and unbolted the frame from the fender top. A bit of pulling and straining, and the frame and crash bar came off the stud, and I was able to unbolt both shocks. I removed the shocks, and went inside to do some research. The more I read, the more I realized I was going to have to replace both shocks, and being that shocks are typically sold in pairs, that facilitated that decision. I decided the Progressive 416 air shock was the route I would go, and after selling my wife on it ("it will make the ride much softer and smoother for you, honest!"), I ordered the set from Cyclemax, which is just around the corner from me - for $319. I also ordered an adapter kit that is required to connect the shocks to an 1100 Aspencade, some new brake pads, and what the hell, a new set of plugs.

So my simple winter maintenance list has now grown:

- Add some LED lights
- Add some noise filtering to the audio circuitry
- Replace the tires
- Adjust the valves
- Replace front & rear brake pads
- Replace rear shocks
- Replace spark plugs

So far, I've replaced the tires. Sigh. It's been sunny and gorgeous all week, of course.



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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Mar 18, 2010 8:42 pm

What's a story without pictures....
Nice new front tire installed
Nice new front tire installed

With trunk and shocks removed
With trunk and shocks removed

The mismatched shocks
The mismatched shocks

Blown shock
Blown shock

Nice new Progressive 416's
Nice new Progressive 416's

robertdawber
Posts: 285
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Location: Eliot, ME
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Thu Mar 18, 2010 9:29 pm

WingAdmin wrote:My winter maintenance plan this year was pretty simple:

- Add some LED lights
- Add some noise filtering to the audio circuitry
- Replace the tires
- Adjust the valves

And that was it. I started late as usual, pulling my bike out last weekend to put the new tires on. The tires I selected to replace my worn out Dunlops were a set of Avon Venoms. The best price I found on the Internet was, surprisingly, at Rocky Mountain ATV MC which is an off-road ATV/dirt bike store. The front 120/90H-18 (71H) Avon Venom AM41 was $107, and the rear 140/90HB-16 (77H) Avon Venom AM42 was $127.99 - quite a bit cheaper than I found anywhere else. And shipping was free - plus I was given a $10 discount, so I ended up paying $225.98 for both tires. An excellent price!

I also ordered a Dyna Beads Starter Kit, for $13.99. After hearing a lot of great reviews about Dyna Beads, I decided to try them. Instead of using lead weights on your wheels, you put these little ceramic beads into the tires, and they move around and adjust the weight dynamically - throughout the life of the tire. It apparently makes the ride much smoother, and extends tire life significantly. This kit contains two 2 oz packets of beads, one for each tire - the correct size for my Goldwing.

With the free shipping, the web site said to expect my order within 5-7 days, which is reasonable. I placed the order at 3 pm. Imagine my utter surprise when at 10:00 the next morning, a pair of brand new motorcycle tires was delivered to my house! No explanation, just "here's the tires you ordered." I wasn't about to complain. Wow!

This is the first time I had a chance to use my new motorcycle lift, and I must say, I love it! I don't know how I managed to work on this bike before without it.

I have a Harbor Freight Bead Breaker, and a set of three of their tire irons, so I pulled the front wheel off my bike, deflated it, and set to work removing the tire. Once I had the old tire off, I cleaned the rim, installed a new valve, and mounted the new tire, first checking to make sure I had the directional tire mounted correctly. My compressor just doesn't have the capacity to seat the beads on tires, so I took it to the local Firestone around the corner, where they are happy to seat the beads on wheels at no charge. I brought the tire home, and set it into place under the front forks. Something didn't look right on the tread. I looked at it, then looked at the sidewall - and realized that I had mounted the damn tire backwards! I said some Very Bad Words, deflated the tire, took it off the rim, turned it around, checked three or four times to make sure I had it right, and re-mounted it. My head hanging, I went back to Firestone to have them seat the bead for me, explaining why I was back with the same tire again. They just laughed and said it happens to everyone. :)

After I had the front tire reinstalled, I installed the Dyna Beads, which was a simple procedure that took all of five minutes. Next, I went to put the brake caliper in place - and had a quick look at the brake pads. Expecting them to be in fairly good shape, as they only had 5,000 miles on them, I was shocked to see that they had about 20% lining remaining. I know I did a lot of hard riding last year, but I wasn't expecting to see that. Add new front brakes to the list.

On to the rear wheel. I pulled the side bags off to gain access to the rear drive and axle. I did not like what I saw. The rubber boot of my left rear shock was covered in shock oil. A blown shock. We'll get to that in a bit.

I pulled the rear wheel off, and had a quick glance at the condition of the rear brakes. I almost fell over - there was virtually no lining left whatsoever, it was almost right down to metal on metal. I know neither my front nor rear wheel was dragging, and there's no discoloration or indication of heat on the rotors, so I can only attribute this to aggressive riding. That said, I'm going to re-examine my brakes to ensure they are releasing correctly.

I deflated the tire, removed it, cleaned the rim, installed a new valve, mounted the new tire, and headed back to Firestone. Once it was seated and ready to be reinstalled, I put a fresh coating of Moly Paste on the spline drive, greased my driveline, and put it all back together. Some Dyna Beads installed, and it's ready to go.

Next, I was on to the shocks. I removed the air line from the left (blown) shock, but wondered why it was different from the right shock? I had a closer look, and to my utter surprise, realized that my left rear shock was an OEM Honda air shock, but my right rear shock was a Progressive 416 air shock. Some previous owner had put two different shocks on my bike! Visions of a simple shock seal rebuild flew out of my head. I was going to have to buy a new shock - I didn't want two different shocks on my bike.

A quick inspection showed that the stud used to mount the shock is also used to mount the rear crash bar, and the rear trunk frame - quite a bit was going to have to come off. I removed the trunk, and unbolted the frame from the fender top. A bit of pulling and straining, and the frame and crash bar came off the stud, and I was able to unbolt both shocks. I removed the shocks, and went inside to do some research. The more I read, the more I realized I was going to have to replace both shocks, and being that shocks are typically sold in pairs, that facilitated that decision. I decided the Progressive 416 air shock was the route I would go, and after selling my wife on it ("it will make the ride much softer and smoother for you, honest!"), I ordered the set from Cyclemax, which is just around the corner from me - for $319. I also ordered an adapter kit that is required to connect the shocks to an 1100 Aspencade, some new brake pads, and what the hell, a new set of plugs.

So my simple winter maintenance list has now grown:

- Add some LED lights
- Add some noise filtering to the audio circuitry
- Replace the tires
- Adjust the valves
- Replace front & rear brake pads
- Replace rear shocks
- Replace spark plugs

So far, I've replaced the tires. Sigh. It's been sunny and gorgeous all week, of course.

Hmmm....I can relate. I was going to change the lighting wire, a new clutch cable and a paint job. Now I am looking into the brakes, I have what appears to be a leaking fork( I found that the right fork support was hand loose-wonder if there is a real leak of just a result of the loose bolts??)
I found that the right and left front caliper are not the same-one looks to be from a 1200....oh-and there is no coolant in my radiator!
Like working on a weekend project around the house!!

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:49 pm

Hmmm...I don't remember for sure, but aren't the front calipers on the 83 supposed to be different sizes, because the right one is linked to the rear?

kanada
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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby kanada » Fri Mar 19, 2010 10:46 am

Yes I have found that the front calipers are indeed different because of the linked brakes.So if they are still linked I wouldn't worry. :D
When all else fails make Beer.

robertdawber
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Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:09 am

kanada wrote:Yes I have found that the front calipers are indeed different because of the linked brakes.So if they are still linked I wouldn't worry. :D

Thanks to both of you for this info. A dealer in NH told me two years ago I had the wrong caliper when I went in for a rebuild kit.
Bob

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Mar 20, 2010 8:11 pm

I finished installing the new Progressive shocks, and their new air lines. That went more or less without a hitch, despite the not-so-great installation instructions provided by Progressive. I documented it as I went, so I'll post a "How To" once I get it all together.

I then cut into my wiring harness and added a few connections for some new LED lighting that I'm adding to my bike.

I have however, solved the mystery of why my rear EBC brake pads wore out after only 5,000 miles:

Worn brake pads
Worn brake pads


I pulled the rear caliper off, pulled the old pads out, retracted the pistons (I opened the bleeder and used my MityVac while doing this, to avoid pushing old, dirty brake fluid up to the master cylinder), put the new pads in, and remounted the caliper.

I spun the back wheel, and it turned free and easy. I then pumped up the brakes until the wheel was stopped solid. I let go of the brake pedal, and the back wheel was almost impossible to turn. The rear brakes weren't releasing!

I put my MityVac back on the caliper and opened the bleeder. The instant I did, the brakes released, and the wheel spun free again.

I knew exactly what this problem is - the tiny return hole in the master cylinder is plugged. So I pulled the master cylinder off, removed the hose feeder from the reservoir, and found the thing full of sludge and crap. Where did that come from in only a year?!?!

Poking out the hole
Poking out the hole


I cleaned out the sludge, and poked the return hole open with a small diameter wire. Put it all back together, pumped it up, and it works great!

My back couldn't take any more leaning over today, so I called it quits. I'll have a go at the front brakes tomorrow and figure out what's going on there.

robertdawber
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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Sat Mar 20, 2010 8:35 pm

WingAdmin wrote:I finished installing the new Progressive shocks, and their new air lines. That went more or less without a hitch, despite the not-so-great installation instructions provided by Progressive. I documented it as I went, so I'll post a "How To" once I get it all together.

I then cut into my wiring harness and added a few connections for some new LED lighting that I'm adding to my bike.

I have however, solved the mystery of why my rear EBC brake pads wore out after only 5,000 miles:

DSC06914.JPG


I pulled the rear caliper off, pulled the old pads out, retracted the pistons (I opened the bleeder and used my MityVac while doing this, to avoid pushing old, dirty brake fluid up to the master cylinder), put the new pads in, and remounted the caliper.

I spun the back wheel, and it turned free and easy. I then pumped up the brakes until the wheel was stopped solid. I let go of the brake pedal, and the back wheel was almost impossible to turn. The rear brakes weren't releasing!

I put my MityVac back on the caliper and opened the bleeder. The instant I did, the brakes released, and the wheel spun free again.

I knew exactly what this problem is - the tiny return hole in the master cylinder is plugged. So I pulled the master cylinder off, removed the hose feeder from the reservoir, and found the thing full of sludge and crap. Where did that come from in only a year?!?!

DSC06918.JPG


I cleaned out the sludge, and poked the return hole open with a small diameter wire. Put it all back together, pumped it up, and it works great!

My back couldn't take any more leaning over today, so I called it quits. I'll have a go at the front brakes tomorrow and figure out what's going on there.

I will be curious to hear what you come up with. Thanks for sharing all of this. Seems odd with a closed system though...Mybe the fluid itself was bad?

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Mar 20, 2010 10:41 pm

robertdawber wrote:I will be curious to hear what you come up with. Thanks for sharing all of this. Seems odd with a closed system though...Mybe the fluid itself was bad?


That was brand new fluid out of a sealed bottle that I put in last spring. I had cleaned out the reservoir, the hose, rebuilt and cleaned the master cylinder and caliper, replaced the brake lines...so I have no idea where it could have come from. I'll watch for it again though, and will have a look at the front tomorrow.

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Sun Mar 21, 2010 7:25 am

WingAdmin wrote:
robertdawber wrote:I will be curious to hear what you come up with. Thanks for sharing all of this. Seems odd with a closed system though...Mybe the fluid itself was bad?


That was brand new fluid out of a sealed bottle that I put in last spring. I had cleaned out the reservoir, the hose, rebuilt and cleaned the master cylinder and caliper, replaced the brake lines...so I have no idea where it could have come from. I'll watch for it again though, and will have a look at the front tomorrow.

I had a similar problem with my front left caliper-When you release the brake pedal/lever-does a vacuum pull the piston back into the caliper?
I wonder if a seal goes if then you have a slightly open system?

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Mar 21, 2010 8:50 am

No, here's what happens: When you let go of the brake pedal/lever, imperceptible side-to-side movements of the brake rotor as it turns push the brake pads back into the caliper - only a few thousandths of an inch, but enough to make them no longer contact the rotor anymore. When the pads (and therefore the pistons) are pushed back into the caliper, brake fluid is pushed back up to the master cylinder, where it is pushed through a pinhole (the one I showed clearing with a wire in the picture above) into the brake fluid reservoir.

If this pinhole becomes blocked, the brake fluid can't be pushed back into the master cylinder, because it has no place to go. So this means the brake pads can't be pushed back into the caliper, and as a result, your brakes drag, or at worst - they lock. This can happen when your brakes get hot, the brake fluid expands, and because it can't go back up into the master cylinder, the only thing it can do is push the pistons out - which locks your brakes on. This is a very serious problem, obviously!

Because you have an 83, your left front caliper is controlled by your hand brake lever, so I would pull it apart and clear that hole out - you'll find it on the top, after you take the brake reservoir off of the master cylinder.

robertdawber
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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:20 am

WingAdmin wrote:No, here's what happens: When you let go of the brake pedal/lever, imperceptible side-to-side movements of the brake rotor as it turns push the brake pads back into the caliper - only a few thousandths of an inch, but enough to make them no longer contact the rotor anymore. When the pads (and therefore the pistons) are pushed back into the caliper, brake fluid is pushed back up to the master cylinder, where it is pushed through a pinhole (the one I showed clearing with a wire in the picture above) into the brake fluid reservoir.

If this pinhole becomes blocked, the brake fluid can't be pushed back into the master cylinder, because it has no place to go. So this means the brake pads can't be pushed back into the caliper, and as a result, your brakes drag, or at worst - they lock. This can happen when your brakes get hot, the brake fluid expands, and because it can't go back up into the master cylinder, the only thing it can do is push the pistons out - which locks your brakes on. This is a very serious problem, obviously!

Because you have an 83, your left front caliper is controlled by your hand brake lever, so I would pull it apart and clear that hole out - you'll find it on the top, after you take the brake reservoir off of the master cylinder.


I have both off and cleaned-I am going to rebuild them anyway as I have them off. No Honda Stores are open around here on Sunday so I ordered the kits last night along with the new fork seals (which I still cannot get the clip off of!)
I figure I have plenty of time to do things and will do them methodically rather than an all out rush-which passion to ride pushes me to do!!
In the meantime-waiting for the parts, redone seas and paint job I will take that apart and take a look. I also found the weep hole leaking on my water pump. I am debating waiting til next winter on that though.
I will be curious to see how you make out with your brakes today

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Mar 21, 2010 10:13 pm

Well I got finished with my brakes today. Looking closer at my front brakes, I decided that the wear I saw was reasonable for 5,000 miles. I did have them off, and I had the new pads in hand, so I went ahead and replaced them anyway. That was a fairly quick job.

The next job I had was to put on a light rail that I bought from CapnDenny1. I had pulled all the lights apart and replaced them with LEDs, and needed to rewire them from scratch, as I had cut off all of the wiring that was on there - it needed it. :) I spent a fair amount of the afternoon adding new disconnects off the main light harness, then fastening and wiring the new rail in place.

By the evening I was putting everything back together, and by 7 pm I had the bike buttoned up and ready to test. One more check to make sure I hadn't forgotten anything, and I suited up and went out for about a 45 minute test ride.

Everything is working great, the brakes aren't dragging, and the new lights look great. What I *did* notice was that the new Avon Venom tires, which have a much more rounded shape than the old worn Dunlop rear that I had on there, are VERY sensitive to turning. At first, I thought something was wrong, the bike felt almost twitchy. I pulled over and checked to make sure something wasn't loose. The Avon Venoms are far more sensitive and almost "squirrely" than the flat old Dunlop (rear) and Bridgestone (front) that I just removed. With my old tires, you had to give it a good bit of counter-steer pressure to get it to diverge from a straight line, and it was slow and predictable in its return. With the new tires, the slightest touch causes it to swerve from its track - and releasing the pressure, it comes back to straight very quickly, it feels like it's almost on the edge of negative dynamic stability. I tried for about 5-10 minutes at different speeds to try to get it to show negative dynamic tendencies, without success, so I'm happy with it - but it will take a bit of getting used to. I suspect once I've got a couple hundred miles on the new tires and they've had a chance to wear a little bit, that this tendency will go away.

Some brake tests, some low-speed parking lot work, and some gradual curves to get the tires scrubbed in, and I headed home.

Overall, I'm happy. I haven't got everything done - I'm still waiting for some LEDs to arrive, and I haven't done the valves yet, or replaced the plugs. But my bike is rideable, and I'm happy to say I've had my first (short) ride of the season!

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Mar 22, 2010 11:47 am

Oh, I should also mention that I am very happy with the Dyna Beads. They are very smooth at all speeds I tested (up to about 60 mph - but I don't expect anything to change above that). I had worried there might be some vibration at low speeds before they distributed themselves inside the tire, but there was none whatsoever - absolutely smooth. We'll see how the tires do in terms of wear, now.

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 24, 2010 12:59 pm

Well I rode my bike to work today, and had a chance to try it out at highway speeds.

I've got a high-speed weave (not a wobble) that starts at about 65 mph, and gets more and more pronounced the faster I go. I tested it up to about 85 mph, at which point I was not comfortable taking it any farther, as the diversions were getting larger and larger.

Unfortunately, I've changed a few things that could possibly be causing this:

- new tires
- tire balancing system
- new rear shocks

So figuring out which one of these it is, is going to take a bit of trial and error.

First thing I'm going to do is to reduce the air pressure in the rear shocks. I know the front shocks haven't changed at all, so I'll leave them at the pressure they've always been set at. I've currently got the rear shocks at around 20 psi. I know the Progressive 416's with no real load (i.e. just me) can handle being run with no air pressure at all, so I'm going to drop it fairly low and see if it makes any difference.

I've got both front and rear tires at 35 psi. Next thing I try after the shocks will be playing with tire pressures.

I'm also going to check for lateral play in the swingarm to make sure the swingarm bearings are OK.

Anyone else have some recommendations?

robertdawber
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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:02 pm

WingAdmin wrote:Well I rode my bike to work today, and had a chance to try it out at highway speeds.

I've got a high-speed weave (not a wobble) that starts at about 65 mph, and gets more and more pronounced the faster I go. I tested it up to about 85 mph, at which point I was not comfortable taking it any farther, as the diversions were getting larger and larger.

Unfortunately, I've changed a few things that could possibly be causing this:

- new tires
- tire balancing system
- new rear shocks

So figuring out which one of these it is, is going to take a bit of trial and error.

First thing I'm going to do is to reduce the air pressure in the rear shocks. I know the front shocks haven't changed at all, so I'll leave them at the pressure they've always been set at. I've currently got the rear shocks at around 20 psi. I know the Progressive 416's with no real load (i.e. just me) can handle being run with no air pressure at all, so I'm going to drop it fairly low and see if it makes any difference.

I've got both front and rear tires at 35 psi. Next thing I try after the shocks will be playing with tire pressures.

I'm also going to check for lateral play in the swingarm to make sure the swingarm bearings are OK.

Anyone else have some recommendations?

I know it may seem obvious-but are you sure you tightened everything when you put it all back together?

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:17 pm

robertdawber wrote:I know it may seem obvious-but are you sure you tightened everything when you put it all back together?


I'm sure, but I'm going to go over it all again tonight just to be doubly sure.

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:20 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
robertdawber wrote:I know it may seem obvious-but are you sure you tightened everything when you put it all back together?


I'm sure, but I'm going to go over it all again tonight just to be doubly sure.

Another thought I had-when you had the tires off could something have happened to a wheel bearing?
By the way-on the front shocks is there a stop/washer above the springs before the cap? I am rebuilding them one at a time and it seems to me that something should be there??

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:59 pm

After I got home from work tonight, I went over the bike looking for anything obviously loose or wrong.

What I DID find is my swingarm has about 1/4" lateral free play at the back end, with a distinct clunking noise coming front the front end when it is moved from side to side. There should be no free play there at all, and certainly no clunking. Looks like I'm off to find some swingarm bearings to order....

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby kanada » Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:04 pm

Maybe that old tire made up for the play? :?:
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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Wed Mar 24, 2010 7:04 pm

WingAdmin wrote:After I got home from work tonight, I went over the bike looking for anything obviously loose or wrong.

What I DID find is my swingarm has about 1/4" lateral free play at the back end, with a distinct clunking noise coming front the front end when it is moved from side to side. There should be no free play there at all, and certainly no clunking. Looks like I'm off to find some swingarm bearings to order....

What do you think may have caused this?

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:33 pm

kanada wrote:Maybe that old tire made up for the play? :?:


That's kind of what I'm thinking. The old tire was quite flat across the middle, and would have a) had a larger contact patch, and b) less sensitivity to directional change.

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:36 pm

robertdawber wrote:What do you think may have caused this?


Old age? :) No idea.

First thing I'm going to do is re-torque the swingarm and see if it is loose. If that doesn't do it, I'll order a bearing kit. But I need to go buy some tools first - I need to make up some kind of tool to loosen the locknut (not going to pay $50 for the special Honda tool - I'll make one out of a socket), and I need to get a 10 mm hex driver with a 1/2" drive so I can put my torque wrench into it.

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:30 pm

Well this is getting to be more and more fun. I had a look at the swingarm diagram for my bike:



Something didn't look quite right. I went and had a look at my bike.

Here is a picture of the swingarm pivot on the left side of my bike:



And here is the swingarm pivot on the right side of my bike:



Anyone notice a slight discrepancy?

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Re: Winter maintenance log

Postby robertdawber » Wed Mar 24, 2010 9:34 pm

Looks like someone altered it with a replacement part-or one from the hardware store. I said before that while working on mine each issue leads to a new one! Just think summer:)




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