'82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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hrobinson
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Joined: Tue Mar 26, 2013 3:23 am
Location: Riverside, California
Motorcycle: 1982 Gl1100

'82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:45 pm



Hi Everyone,

I have started with the rebuild of my carbs on my 82 goldwing with about 156K on the bike.

I am not a mechanic by any means but after looking at videos and purchasing GL1100 Carburetor Repair Manual written by noted GL1100 guru Howard Halasz, I feel confident that this can be accomplished successfully.

At the time of this posting. I have just about completed the disassembley of the carbs, but I have a few more parts to take off the bike.

This post will not be a documentary how I rebuilt the carbs. I am just following Howard Halasz's instructions in the manual you can purchase at this link: http://randakks.com/collections/guides/products/honda-gl1100-goldwing-carburetor-repair-guide-1

One thing I will cover in this thread is how I plan on getting my carbs nice and clean. I have not seen very many posts on the usage of an Ultrasonic cleaner to clean the carbs, and it left lots of questions as to what to do or buy. I did research different options and came up with a solution that I feel did not break the bank. I will tell you what I bought and what I used to get the carbs clean.

Please note that Randakk has changed the location of his TechTips for the GL1100. Make sure you review these tips before re-assembly. The page for the GL1100 carb techtips is here: http://www.randakksblog.com/category/honda-gl1100/carb-fuel-gl-1100/. The exact article I am refering to is here: http://www.randakksblog.com/gl1100-carb-details/

One important thing to note. For my project, I have been experiencing stuck floats problems while the bike was running. Mostly this resulted in overfilling the bowl and sever flooding of the engine. At times If I did not turn off the fuel ****, Gravity would flood the combustion chamber with fuel, and hydrolock the bike. Clearing this problem was easy, I simply pulled all the plugs, turned the emergency switch on and hit the starter button. All the fuel would fly out the holes.

What were the other indications? I have found that by pulling the plugs on all cylinders Cyl-2 and Cyl-4 were fouled black (too much fuel). The plugs also smelled like raw gas. Also the bike started Idling like crap. This also was an indication of a stuck float. If I turned off the fuel valve and waited about a minute or two, the bike would begin to idle normally until the fuel ran out of the carbs. When I turned the fuel back on, after about a minute or two, the bike would start idling rough again. The RPMS would drop and the bike would almost die because of too much fuel.

The solution to this problem is to purchase new needle valves and seats. Honda still has these parts in stock. I plan on replacing all 4 and it cost me $130.00. Needle valves and seats are NOT included in the Randakk kit. I tell you this because I found out that if you send in your carbs to be rebuild by Pete Brody "Pistol Petes Services" they will replace those needle valves and seats automatically. Why you ask? Remember this bike is over 30 years old and so are those needle valves. So with Randakk's kit costing 222 and an additional 130 for the needle valves and seats, the total cost for this project excluding tools is $352.

My argument is since you have the carbs out why not do it right and replace them with fresh needle valves and seats. So remember if you get Randakk's kit, make sure you get new needle valves and seats FROM HONDA ONLY. Don't get 3rd party needle valves and seats as they are not made to the same specifications as Honda. The ones you get from other sites, the needle valves could be too short (in which case they close too late over filling the bowl) or too long in which case they may never open. This just simply causes you more problems than the money you saved.

With out further ado. Enjoy your Shop Porn.

These first set of pictures show the Carb set out of the bike and on my bench before I started dis-assembly.
Top View
Top View

Rear of the carb body
Rear of the carb body

Throttle body 2 and 4
Throttle body 2 and 4

Front of Carb body
Front of Carb body

Throttle body 1 and 3
Throttle body 1 and 3

Now I am further along in the dis-assembly of the carb body. I have already removed all of the float bowls, needle valves, seats, Main Jet, and Idle jet. I have removed all rubber seals and placed them in my discard container. Remember if your Goldwing is an 1981 or less, your idle jets are pressed in and NOT removable. The following pictures show just after I have split the plenum. I had a heck of a time removing the 5 #3 Phillips head screws. One of them stripped and I had to use a vise grip to break it free. This was the only one that had the problem and it was easy to get at with a vice grip.

The Plenum is split
The Plenum is split

Each carb pair is held together by 4 screws on each plenum half. Once you detach the carb pair from the plenum half, they will separate easily by GENTLY pulling them apart WITHOUT TWISTING, so that you avoid damage to the Main Fuel Transfer tube and Accelerator Fuel Tube. There are little o-rings on these tubes which also need replacing which are included in the kit by Randakk.

I also labeled every carb with zip ties. One zip tie for Carb 1, two zip ties for Carb 2, three zip ties for Carb 3 and how may for carb 4? ... Wrong ... No zip ties. I always know the one with no zip ties is carb 4. You need to do this BEFORE removing the carbs from the plenum half. Otherwise it will get confusing REAL FAST.
Left Half
Left Half

Right Half
Right Half

Now that the carbs have been completely dis-assembled I took pictures of each carb.

In the next post I will show you each carb after It was dis-assembled.


Last edited by hrobinson on Thu Aug 28, 2014 3:20 am, edited 3 times in total.

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Wed Aug 27, 2014 10:56 pm

Here are the Pics of Carb-1 fully dis-assembled.
Attachments
Carb 1-1
Carb 1-1
Carb 1-2
Carb 1-2
Carb 1-3
Carb 1-3
Carb 1-4
Carb 1-4
Carb 1-5
Carb 1-5
Carb 1-6
Carb 1-6

hrobinson
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Location: Riverside, California
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Wed Aug 27, 2014 11:09 pm

Carb #2: Here are the pictures for Carb 2
Attachments
Carb 2-1
Carb 2-1
Carb 2-2
Carb 2-2
Carb 2-3
Carb 2-3
Carb 2-4
Carb 2-4
Carb 2-5
Carb 2-5
Carb 2-6
Carb 2-6

hrobinson
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Location: Riverside, California
Motorcycle: 1982 Gl1100

Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Thu Aug 28, 2014 12:48 am

Carb 3: This next series is of Carb 3
Attachments
Carb 3-1
Carb 3-1
Carb 3-2
Carb 3-2
Carb 3-3
Carb 3-3
Carb 3-4
Carb 3-4
Carb 3-5
Carb 3-5
Carb 3-6
Carb 3-6

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Thu Aug 28, 2014 1:15 am

Carb 4 - This next series is of Carb # 4
Carb 4-1
Carb 4-1

Carb 4-2
Carb 4-2

Carb 4-3
Carb 4-3

Carb 4-4  I did not remove the Accelerator pump from this carb yet
Carb 4-4 I did not remove the Accelerator pump from this carb yet

Carb 4-5
Carb 4-5

Carb 6-5
Carb 6-5

A couple of notes regarding the dis-assembly of my carb body.

First I noticed that these carbs were retrofitted with the newer teflon slides. This was thought to resolve performance issues because of problems with the slides hitting the sides of the slide chamber. Scuffing resulted which caused poor performance and slide movement. This did not resolve the problem. The Teflon surface has been scuffed. I don't know if I can place these slides in the ultrasonic cleaner as it may remove the Teflon surface. I will have to research this more.

Everything went pretty smoothly, I did only strip 1 screw and another one is close to being stripped. I have not looked in the Randakk kit but I believe the kit has all the replacement screws but I have yet to get into the kit and open it.

Problems as I was disassembling the carb body.

1. A problem I discovered as I removing slides was one slide was stuck in the down position. I had to really struggle to get the slide removed. when I finally removed the slide (by pulling and twisting at the same time) I also found the pin was loose. I believe these are removable and I will look at the parts more closely as I clean them up.

2. Another problem was the number 4 accelerator pump rubber was folded over, like a piece of paper. I don't know if this was an assembly mistake at the factory, but take a look at this. The fold is in the 5-o'clock position.
Accelerator Pump folded over.
Accelerator Pump folded over.

3. Then if one slide was stuck down, I had another slide stuck in the up position.
4. All slides have a prabolic scuff to them. I will put pictures in the post when I am getting ready to clean parts.
5. Other accelerator pumps rubbers were worn so thin that you could see daylight through the black rubber.

In the next post I will make a few comments about organization.
Last edited by hrobinson on Thu Aug 28, 2014 3:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Thu Aug 28, 2014 1:51 am

This next post covers organization.

It is so vitally important to be very orginized for this to be successful. If you tare into this set without having a logical approach to its dis-assembly you will get lost very quickly and the re-assembled carb will not function correctly and very likely leak. All my parts are in separate bins, labeled 1,2,3,4

See these pictures:
First Set of containers
First Set of containers

Second and Third set of containers
Second and Third set of containers


In the second picture you see two sets of containers. The larger set was suppose to be for trash from each carb. Unfortunately as you can see from the first picture, the first containers were a bit too small. Yes coffee cans do work in this situation wonderfully but I don't drink coffee from coffee cans. I love to grind my own beans. So I bought Ziploc containers from Wal*Mart.

The small blue round containers contain ALL the really tiny small parts of the carbs. Again they are labeled to what carb they came out of. These containers contain the jets, the needle valves, seats and any other small part related to that carb.

I also have a container that contains the parts related to the plenum.

Work in a methodical manner. Work on one carb at a time. Be patient. This is not a project that gets done in a day. More like 3 or 4 days especially if you have never performed something like this.

Its not incredibly complicated. Its just EVERYTHING MUST BE REALLY CLEAN. especially when you begin re-assembling the carb.

It is very necessary that the '82 carb body is completely dis-assembled this is so that you can replace all 4 accelerator pumps and the seals to the Main Fuel transfer and accelerator fuel tubes.

A small story that goes with that last statement.

I had a couple of friends who have owned at one time or still own Goldwings of this era. They were with me when I did the dis-assembly part. They were trying to convince me that it is not necessary to fully dis-assemble the carb body. I am a computer guy. Computers operate a certain way. They do exactly what they are told even if the programmer did not want it to work that way. Well I felt that the carbs work in the same way, in an analog way. Everything is sized and positioned so that the proper amount of fuel enters the combustion chamber at the correct time. I told them Hey the instructions told me I must do this. Both of my friends look at me and one of them says "if a computer tells you that you must wipe the hard drive do you do it"? I thought about it a bit and said sure, but after I back up my data.

My point is they were telling me just to spray a can of carb cleaner everywhere I could reach and use a can per carb. I told him I am having so much problems with the carbs, and its such a PIA (Pain in the A**) to pull the carbs out that I was doing this once and I was doing it the right way. Methodically, carefuly and with care.

By the way, after I got all the carbs separated, both of my friends were fascinated with the main fuel transfer and accelerator fuel tubes. He looked in one accelerator fuel tube, and it was clear, then he looked in the other one and guess what? Yes it was plugged and plugged really well. So if I had not taken the carbs completely apart, I would not have found that problem, and all my time would have been wasted, again.

Next I will play with this:
My Ultrasonic Cleaner
My Ultrasonic Cleaner

and this
Cleaning solution
Cleaning solution


I can't wait as I have not played with it since it arrived a year ago.

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virgilmobile
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby virgilmobile » Thu Aug 28, 2014 7:05 am

I'll add just a little more info for you...
Before you put the carbs back on the bike....Bench test them.
Use a shop vac on each carb..operate the throttle and look at the movement of the slide.Repeat for each carb.
Mechanically adjust the throttle plates so they are just opening at the same time.Or as close as possible.
Fill the carbs with fuel from a raised container ( 4 foot) to simulate 2psi of fuel.
Be sure they don't leak or flood.
Drain each carb and look at the ammount of fuel in each one.They all should be the same.
Sync the carbs on the bike at 1k rpm.

indianakid
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby indianakid » Fri Aug 29, 2014 9:24 am

you are doing a great job of documenting the rebuild process. could you post pics of the main jet emulsion tube showing the hole pattern also what were the main and idle jet size? and you probably know this by now that the accelerator pump is in the float bowl of the number 3 carb and the 4 diaphragms are the air cut off valves. and those will have to be replaced. and i agree with the one that was folded over was installed that way. good luck with the rest of your rebuild!

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Mon Sep 01, 2014 3:01 am

virgilmobile wrote:I'll add just a little more info for you...
Before you put the carbs back on the bike....Bench test them.
Use a shop vac on each carb..operate the throttle and look at the movement of the slide.Repeat for each carb.
Mechanically adjust the throttle plates so they are just opening at the same time.Or as close as possible.
Fill the carbs with fuel from a raised container ( 4 foot) to simulate 2psi of fuel.
Be sure they don't leak or flood.
Drain each carb and look at the ammount of fuel in each one.They all should be the same.
Sync the carbs on the bike at 1k rpm.


That is a very good Idea, I will take that under advisement.

Harold

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Mon Sep 01, 2014 3:07 am

indianakid wrote:you are doing a great job of documenting the rebuild process. could you post pics of the main jet emulsion tube showing the hole pattern also what were the main and idle jet size? and you probably know this by now that the accelerator pump is in the float bowl of the number 3 carb and the 4 diaphragms are the air cut off valves. and those will have to be replaced. and i agree with the one that was folded over was installed that way. good luck with the rest of your rebuild!


I don't have those pictures yet, but I will be happy to photograph them for you. I am fairly confident that this carb had not been worked on by anyone else before I had it. The bike always ran fine up until a few years ago. When i removed the idle mixture screws, the limiter caps were already off. One mixture screw the slot is broken. The screw is not. I am considering buying a new Idle mixture screw, using the Kawasaki part number.

Everything else is really dirty, and some rust (as viewed in the pictures I posted) is on the inside of the throttle body. All of that will come off with the ultrasonic cleaning which I will cover in a day or two.

Harold

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Mon Sep 15, 2014 6:27 pm

Hi Everyone,

Today its 106 degrees in Southern California Its even hotter in the Garage. So with permission from the wife, she has allowed me to continue the rebuild process in the air conditioned comfort of our apartment. So today is the day that I start using the Ultrasonic cleaner. For those who have asked questions about my previous posts, I am in the process of answering them along with any requested pictures.

For this part of the project I have selected the SharperTek Solution called "1220 Carburetor Cleaner Degreaser". I found this solution by doing a lot of research.

It looks like this:

SharperTek 1220 Carburetor Cleaner Degreaser
SharperTek 1220 Carburetor Cleaner Degreaser


This video:

convinced me that this product was the best for vintage carburetors such as mine. I also felt the Shellac-Buster was too strong for the finish on the carbs as if its left on the carbs over time it can turn the outside black.

Here is another article I found on the SharperTek site that is guiding me in my process. Though this could be a sales pitch, I believe this is a satisfied customer who has bought the product and has basically explained how its used. I felt if this was good for Manx Moters, must be good for me.

http://www.sharpertek.com/ultrasonic-cleaner-info-ultrasonic-carburetor-cleaner--faq-.html

I have read on the forums, use simple green, or "lemon juice" or a couple drops of Dish soap. Other comments I have seen are "I bought the ultrasonic cleaner from Harbor Freight and it works pretty good". I have read in many different forums that Simple Green can turn your carburetors black. Other home remedys work better or worse depending on how long you leave the part in the tank.

With that I decided all the home chemicals just will not work for what I want to do. I always believe in the right tool for the job and this appears to be it. I elected not to use the Harbor Freight ultrasonic cleaner for one simple reason. The Harbor Freight ultrasonic cleaner is just too small for the job. For an Ultrasonic cleaner to be effective the part must be completely submerged for the cleaning to be effective. The harbor Freight cleaner is simply NOT big enough to completely submerge the carb body in the tank. In addition, MUST BE RAISED off the bottom of the cleaner to make sure the part is cleaned properly. That is the purpose of the basket. Again, the Harbor Freight cleaner was just too small for the job. I did not want to mess around with the parts as they were being cleaned. I selected the DSA210SE-GL2 because it measures inside the tank 300x155x150 (measured in millimeters) and its just the right size to put one or two carb bodies in at once. It has 400 watts of power and has a 1 to 60 minute timer, and has a 7L capacity.

Working with the cleaner, It has a couple of cleaning modes. This sets the frequency of the transducers to either 40khz, and 20khz.

40khz - this is the most popular general use ultrasonic cleaning frequency
    - High Frequency ultrasonic systems generally produce a very evenly distributed cleaning effect but a less powerful one.
    -> 40 KHz ultrasonic cleaners are quieter in operation and produce a gentle cleaning action
    -> It is appropriate for the removal of common contanimants from parts but may not consistently remove contaniments from tight tollerance areas.
    -> 40 Khz also has a tendency to remove particles which are smaller than 20khz systems
    -> 40 khz ultrasonic cleaners are less destructive to the cleaning tank thank 20khz systems.

20khz ultrasonic cleaners / heavy duty cleaning for simple part designs
    -> although the 20khz frequency produces a less evenly distributed cleaning effect, the scrubbing action that is produced is very powerful which can be a positive or a negative. The power is of benefit when cleaning heavy parts such as plastic injection molds weighting 2000 pounds, or cleaning those parts with highly-bonded contaminants such as burned carbon. The power is destructive when cleaning sensitive components such as aluminum or soft metals or those parts with finely machined detail.

    -> 20khz system may also remove thicker contaminant layers faster than higher frequencies.

    -> Since 20Khz ultrasonic systems essentially "Drill holes" on the surface of the part with a large amount of power. This frequency tends to remove thick layers of containment in large chunks, while higher frequencies remote the same containiments by attempting to remove layer by layer.

    -> As such 20khz systems may be more effective when removing paint. Thick greases or coatings or other similar containments.

I think this is very important:

When to use 20kzh ultrasonic cleaners:
    -> When cleaning large and heavy parts with little detail.
    -> When removing highly-bonded containments.
    -> when higher frequencies fail to clean a part
    -> when cleaning thick containment layers

One of the last things I wanted to put in this post was the use of DE-IONIZED water. I have read in several forums, the use of DE-IONIZED water makes the cleaning very effective. I have a friend who owns a tool and die shop, he has two EDM machines which use DE-IONIZED water to make parts. I asked him for 6 Gals of water and he gave it to me. DE-IONIZED water can be very expensive, so if you can find a shop that has DE-IONIZED water, you might be able to get a good deal on it.

My process will be simple.
    -> Mix 8 oz of SharperTek 1220 cleaner to 1 Gal of DE-IONIZED water which is just about 3.7 liters. The instructions did say between 4oz and 8oz per gal is all that is required. The solution is not Acidic, but Alkaline which I feel will be a little easier on the carburetors and prevent corrosion when the cleaning process is complete.

    -> Set the heater to 135 degrees. This will allow the on board heater to heat the solution to 135 degrees

    -> Allow to run at 20khz for 30 minutes without any parts in the tank. This I will do every time I mix new solution.

    -> Set the cleaner to 40khz set the timer for 30 minutes and allow the part to clean for that time.

    -> Remove the part from the cleaner and place in a bucket of clean water to rinse the part of any remaining chemical.

    -> Repeat until everything is clean.

After I mixed the first Gal of solution I found that the ultrasonic cleaner would only hold 3.7L. The level (as you can see from the picture below) is all the way to the top. So I don't know who was measuring but its definitely NOT 7L

My next step is to let the system run for 30 minutes which will allow the solution to heat up to 135 degrees and remove gasses from the solution. This process is called degassing. It is a necessary step to ensure the solution will clean my parts effectively.

Water Level and De-Gassing the solution
Water Level and De-Gassing the solution


I will give you a before and an after picture of each carb just to show how well the ultrasonic cleaner works.

[edit] after 30 minutes at 40KHZ, the carb body is definitely cleaner but not clean enough. I decided to set the cleaner to 20Khz and run it for 15 minutes. This is to get rid of any grime on the carb body. I want to be careful NOT to over "Clean" the carb and cause holes or to enlarge passages because I am using a more aggressive cleaning mode.

[edit-2 ] After 15 minutes at 20Khz, the grime is much less. I have decided to reset it to 40Khz again and run it for another 30 minutes. Manx Motors has a system that is twice as powerful as mine. His system is 800 watts vs my 400 watts Since his system has twice the power, that would explain why its taking me twice as long to clean the carbs.

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Mon Sep 15, 2014 8:41 pm

Carb number 1 - Before

Carb-1-1 Before Cleaning
Carb-1-1 Before Cleaning


Carb number 1 - After

Carb 1-1 After Cleaning
Carb 1-1 After Cleaning


Carb number 1 - Before

Carb 1-2 Before Cleaning
Carb 1-2 Before Cleaning


Carb number 1 - After

Carb 1-2 After Cleaning
Carb 1-2 After Cleaning


Carb number 1 - Before

Carb 1-3 Before Cleaning
Carb 1-3 Before Cleaning


Carb number 1 - After

Carb 1-3 After Cleaning
Carb 1-3 After Cleaning


Some additional notes regarding this process.

My first stage of cleaning was to run at 40 khz for 30 minutes. Finding the carb body not adequately clean
My second stage of cleaning was to run at 20 khz for 15 minutes to clean the tough grime off. Finding the carb body still not adequately clean
My third stage of cleaning was to run at 40 khz for 30 minutes.

The carb body at this point is mostly clean. as you can see in the third pair of shots, the Choke plate did not get as clean as I had desired.

I am going to modify my procedure to see if I have any improvement.

Stage 1: Run the ultrasonic cleaner at 40 khz for 30 minutes.
Stage 2: check the part and then reset the ultrasonic cleaner for 20 khz and 15 minutes. Run for 15 minutes.
Stage 3: Check the part and then reset the ultrasonic cleaner for 40 khz and 30 minutes. Run for 30 minutes.
Stage 4: Check the part and then reset the ultrasonic cleaner for 20 khz and 15 minutes. Run for 15 minutes.

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Mon Sep 15, 2014 9:12 pm

Carb Number 2-1 - Before

Carb 2-1 Before Cleaning
Carb 2-1 Before Cleaning


Carb Number 2-1 - After

Carb 2-1 After Cleaning
Carb 2-1 After Cleaning


Carb Number 2-2 - Before

Carb 2-2 Before Cleaning
Carb 2-2 Before Cleaning


Carb Number 2-2 - After

Carb 2-2 After Cleaning
Carb 2-2 After Cleaning


Carb Number 2-3 - Before

Carb 2-3 Before Cleaning
Carb 2-3 Before Cleaning


Carb Number 2-3 - After

Carb 2-3 After Cleaning
Carb 2-3 After Cleaning


Carb Number 2-4 - Before

Carb 2-4 Before Cleaning
Carb 2-4 Before Cleaning


Carb Number 2-4 - After

Carb 2-4 After Cleaning
Carb 2-4 After Cleaning

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Tue Sep 16, 2014 1:06 am

Carb Number 4-1 - Before

Carb 4-1 Before Cleaning
Carb 4-1 Before Cleaning


Carb Number 4-2 - Before

Carb 4-2 Before Cleaning
Carb 4-2 Before Cleaning


Carb Number 4-3 - Before

Carb 4-3 Before Cleaning
Carb 4-3 Before Cleaning


Carb Number 4-4 - Before
Carb 4-4 Before Cleaning
Carb 4-4 Before Cleaning

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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Sep 16, 2014 9:54 am

Excellent detail and pictures. While your pictures show considerable difference in the cleanliness of the carb exteriors, it should be mentioned that one of the primary benefits of ultrasonic cleaning is that it can clean the interior passages and ports of the carb, which can be otherwise unreachable by conventional mechanical cleaning methods.

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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:37 am

WingAdmin wrote:Excellent detail and pictures. While your pictures show considerable difference in the cleanliness of the carb exteriors, it should be mentioned that one of the primary benefits of ultrasonic cleaning is that it can clean the interior passages and ports of the carb, which can be otherwise unreachable by conventional mechanical cleaning methods.


Yes that is a very good point. I just finished drying 3 carb bodies with compressed air checking to make sure all the circuits are open. All 3 carbs look almost new, and all fuel circuits tested with flying colors. I still have a 4th one to dry out but I believe that it will be the same the other 3.

I have a small 1.5Gal compressor a friend gave me. You know it takes A LOT of air to dry these carbs out. I had to be careful not to over heat the compressor, so after it would kick on, I would wait for it to pump up to 120psi. For this project a bigger compressor is always a good thing.

After 3 carbs I really felt that I needed to change the solution. When the solution was drained, at the bottom of the tank I found 3 parts, an alignment dowel which would not come off during dis-assembly, and 3 washers. I drained the solution in a bucket checking to make sure there were no missing parts. I did not see any.

hrobinson
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Re: '82 GL1100 Carburetor Rebuild Project

Postby hrobinson » Fri Sep 19, 2014 8:47 pm

Hi everyone,

My project is progressing. I have completed all the carburetor bodies, dried them and put them in plastic bags. The plenum and fire screens have also gone through the cleaner, everything I put through the cleaner looks almost new.

I thought I would provide everyone a post I found. It is a webpage that has a Q&A on ultrasonic cleaners, their care and use. I had read this a while back before deciding on spending money on a good ultrasonic cleaner.

Here is the link: http://www.tmasc.com/qa%20process.htm

Things I discovered with my ultrasonic cleaning unit.

1. The carb bodies required a total of 2 hours in the cleaner. I alternated 30 minutes on 20Khz, which is the more aggressive cleaning mode. Then 30 minutes on 40Khz which is the gentler more even mode of cleaning. The Plenum halves took only an hour for each one. The other parts I am estimating about a half an hour. I know this time seems excessive, but as I tested the cleaner, I found that I needed more time to get the parts as clean as I wanted. I ran parts at the longer time and found no problems with pitting or damage to the carb bodies. I believe this is due to the power of the ultrasonic cleaner. The video I posted earlier the Manx garage has an 8 Gal system which is almost 3 times as powerful. FOR MY UNIT, the two hours was just enough to clean the dirt and get rid of all the contaminants on the carbs. Your mileage may very depending on the unit you decide to purchase.

2. I did need to change the solution after I did 3 carb bodies. Then again after I did the other carb body and the two plenum halves. Changing the solution was easy and after the de-gassing process which is 30 minutes at 20Khz the new solution was up to temp and ready for cleaning. With larger tanks it might be a good idea to filter the solution in cheese cloth to avoid the long wait to get the solution back up to temperature.

3. The ultrasonic cleaner keeps the solution at 140 degrees. For my machine, the solution seems to heat up when cleaning is going on. I have the temp set to 125, and 140 is the recommended cleaning temp for the solution.




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