82 gl1100 info


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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troymilton
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2014 8:22 pm
Location: Pulaski, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: "82 GL1100A Aspencade

82 gl1100 info

Postby troymilton » Sun Sep 14, 2014 9:46 am



Hi,I recently bought an 82 Aspencade and was wondering if there are any particular items that are a recurring issue on this model.It only has 22000 miles and was told by the previous owner that it had the alternater changed out to I believe it was the green wire one or the green wire one was replaced.Any feedback I can get on this is greatly appreciated.Thanks,Troy
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HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Sun Sep 14, 2014 10:37 am

The "alternator" on these older Goldwings isn't what most of us think of when we think of an alternator. One thing I was told to do when I bought mine was to inspect the three yellow wires that connect the "stator" to the Voltage regulator/rectifier for corrosion. If you remove the left side cover, and look just forward of the battery tray, you should see a plastic connector with 3 yellow wires coming into it from beneath the connector, and three yellow wires coming into it from above the connector. The wires in the lower part are the wires from the stator (or alternator if you choose to call it that). The wires on the upper half are the wires that take the alternating current produced by the "alternator" to the regulator/rectifier. The R/R is where your AC is converted to DC on the motorcycle.

Because of the location of this connector, it is often degraded. Once corrosion sets in (you can easily take the connector apart to inspect the condition of the spade connections inside) it doesn't take long before the connection overheats, fails, and then the alternator will fail. To replace the stator, you have to remove the engine from the frame.... So, most folks who own these older bikes have taken to cutting the connector out of the path of current from the stator to the R/R and will solder the wires to their mate going to the R/R, then cover the solder joints with shrink tubing to waterproof the solder joint.

Because it is AC current, it doesn't matter which one of the yellow wires on the "inlet" to the connector that you solder to the yellow wire going to the R/R.... any pair soldered together works as long as all three wires are soldered WELL to their mate. Once this is done, it appears the charging system is pretty reliable.

Another place to look ahead for trouble is the dogbone fuse. It is located near your start solenoid. If you search the forum, you can find pictures of where it is and how to change or replace it. It is something I'd definitely look into before it causes trouble. Many VERY strange manifestations of failure have been documented here. It is one of those things that is far easier to go ahead and replace now than figure out what's wrong with the bike later.

If your bike came from someone who took good care of it, 22000 miles is nothing. I'd probably change oil to whatever you like to use. I used DELO 400LE Heavy Duty Motor Oil because I like it. Stay away from "energy conserving" oils, as they can cause trouble with your clutch. While you have the oil drained out, go ahead and do the oil filter, air filter and fuel filter, unless the previous owner has records of recent maintenance.

Next, I'd be checking tire condition, inflation pressure. The final drive may need maintenance. The drive shaft connects to the rear wheel through a differential and that differential is connected to the rear wheel bolting through the final drive flange. The differential drives the rear wheel through a series of splines that mate with splines on the final drive flange. These need regular maintenance by way of an application of Honda Moly lube 60. It is a molybdenum disulfide grease (60 % moly I'm told) that should be spread on both halves of splines before the final drive splines are pushed into the final drive flange and bolted to the wheel. It's probably okay to do this every time you change the rear tire, but if you don't know when the last time the spines were lubricated, it is a good thing to do.

I just bought a 1981 Gl1100I, and I'm in the process of doing the same things I'm putting up here. Mine has close to 70K miles on it, and the final drive splines are badly worn. I'm going to baby it a little until I buy a new flange and spline for the final drive.. I changed my rear tire, wheel bearings... greased the final drive splines, swing arm grease fitting, replaced disc pads on the rear caliper. Next is the front tire, wheel bearings, pads... fork oil... just stuff we have to do if we're going to ride old bikes in general. I did solder the stator and R/R wires. Mine were an absolute mess. I don't know why they worked, but they did... and I'm glad I soldered them before my stator failed.

That's about all I can think of other than this: Don't be afraid to go out and RIDE.... and Welcome to the forum!
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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troymilton
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2014 8:22 pm
Location: Pulaski, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: "82 GL1100A Aspencade

Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby troymilton » Sun Sep 14, 2014 10:50 am

Appreciate all the info Hawkeye.I got the bike for $550 and all I did was spend a couple days with some sos pads cleaning up rust.The previous owner kept it well maintained but it had been sitting since 07 due to health problems he had.I have had v-twins before and never thought I'd like an"old mans bike"but it rides like a dream.Made me a believer.Once again "thanks".Troy

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HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Sun Sep 14, 2014 10:55 am

@ 550$ you stole it... You should be able to ride that Old Man's bike for another 200,000 miles or so, if you look after it.

To me, regular oil changes and getting the bike out on the road and riding make them last better than anything else you can do. I prefer the ride of the 1100 over the ride of the 1200, but I'm probably one of the few who do.

There's an absolute TON of great information on this site and many people who have forgot more about these old motorcycles than I'll ever know.

I know the weather here is perfect for a ride, and I'm heading out for a little joy in a few minutes myself..
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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dingdong
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Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000
1993 gl1500
2004 NRX1800 Rune

Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby dingdong » Sun Sep 14, 2014 12:07 pm

In my opinion the most important thing to do, if you have no service records to prove otherwise, is change the timing belts. These engines are called interference style engines. On this type of engine if a belt breaks the pistons and valves will collide. Bent valves "will" occur and possibly damage to a piston or piston rod. Not trying to scare you but it is very important to do this. Especially on a Wing that has been sitting for a while.
Yeah! I agree, you stole that bike. Good luck.
Tom

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

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HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Sun Sep 14, 2014 6:12 pm

You are absolutely right. I completely forgot about timing belts.

dingdong wrote:In my opinion the most important thing to do, if you have no service records to prove otherwise, is change the timing belts. These engines are called interference style engines. On this type of engine if a belt breaks the pistons and valves will collide. Bent valves "will" occur and possibly damage to a piston or piston rod. Not trying to scare you but it is very important to do this. Especially on a Wing that has been sitting for a while.
Yeah! I agree, you stole that bike. Good luck.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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702scottc
Posts: 249
Joined: Tue May 15, 2012 12:12 am
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Motorcycle: 1980 GL1100 Interstate (sold)
1990 GL1500 Aspencade (sold)
2005 GL1800

Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby 702scottc » Sun Sep 14, 2014 9:00 pm

Ditto on the timing belts. Check the condition of the tensioners as well. Ride it like you stold it! Sounds like you did, 550$, what a deal..

Old Fogey
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Motorcycle: 1976 GL1000
1979 GL1000
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Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby Old Fogey » Mon Sep 15, 2014 8:09 pm

HawkeyeGL1200 wrote:
Next, I'd be checking tire condition, inflation pressure. The final drive may need maintenance. The drive shaft connects to the rear wheel through a differential and that differential is connected to the rear wheel bolting through the final drive flange. The differential drives the rear wheel through a series of splines that mate with splines on the final drive flange. These need regular maintenance by way of an application of Honda Moly lube 60. It is a molybdenum disulfide grease (60 % moly I'm told) that should be spread on both halves of splines before the final drive splines are pushed into the final drive flange and bolted to the wheel. It's probably okay to do this every time you change the rear tire, but if you don't know when the last time the spines were lubricated, it is a good thing to do.


All good advice, and while you have the rear wheel off, remove the final drive unit and grease the drive shaft splines and pinion with the Moly60 grease too.
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Wilcoy02
Posts: 725
Joined: Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:37 pm
Location: Marengo, Ohio
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 I purchased 3/16

1983 GL1100I frame with an 80 engine. poor boy installed with C-5 ignition--DIED in Grande Prairie Alberta Canada 8/15


98 valkyrie sold 8/16

Re: 82 gl1100 info

Postby Wilcoy02 » Mon Sep 15, 2014 9:23 pm

If it has been sitting check the date the tires were manufactured on the side walls. You will see a 4 digit on it: like 0112 This says it was made the first week of 2012. If the tires are older than 4 years you should replace them as sitting the rubber will get hard and could cause a blowout.




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