Lucas Oil Stabilizer


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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rjbrownley
Posts: 34
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 5:53 am
Location: Rochester
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 Interstate

Lucas Oil Stabilizer

Postby rjbrownley » Thu Dec 18, 2014 8:49 pm



Has anyone used Lucas oil stabilizer? I had a friend tell me when doing an oil change on my bike (1983 GL1100I) to replace one of the quarts of oil with the Lucas Oil Stabilizer. Suppose to help prevent oil leaks. What do you guys think?



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HawkeyeGL1200
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Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Lucas Oil Stabilizer

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Fri Dec 19, 2014 8:10 am

While it is possible to "fix" oil leaks using some products, I would rather just figure out what gaskets or seals are allowing the oil to leak out of where ever it is I'm trying to keep oil in and replace those gaskets or seals.

Oil can leave varnish inside the engine. This varnish can be hard and brittle. If there is a significant amount of varnish inside the engine, it can interfere with the "soft" seals and can even prevent them from working properly. If the seal is leaking, but not damaged, adding a product that has certain esters in it will chemically remove the varnish and can (repeat CAN) allow the seal(s) that are leaking but undamaged to begin functioning normally again. The same result can be had by using a more aggressive method of adding a powerful solvent to the motor oil, running the engine for the amount of time prescribed by the solvent maker, and then changing the oil. Similar results can be had by using synthetic oils (which often are pre-mixed with these cleaning esters) and some conventional motor oils with cleaning properties...

The advantage additives and ester oils have over the more "harsh" solvents is, the *generally* remove the varnish build up more slowly, and they reduce the possibility of large pieces of varnish flaking off or chipping off which can potentially block oil passages or even block the oil screen with can "starve" the engine of oil. While I've never heard of anyone having this kind of thing happen, I suppose it is possible.

My preferred method of "cleaning up" the inside of any engine is to run conventional motor oil for a few oil and filter changes, and then adding a quart of synthetic oil to a few oil and filter changes to introduce more of those esters into the crankcase to finish up the job that the clean oil has started... There's off the shelf additives like the Lucas, which I have refrained from using in motorcycle shares cases, because I do not know if there are any "energy conserving" additives in them, which I am told are not good to use in an application where "wet" clutches are present..

To answer the question, no... I do not use Lucas products. It's not that I have anything against them, or know of anything "wrong" with them... I don't use them because I don't know or can't say that they work any better than just changing your oil frequently with high quality lubricating oil... and ... there are NO products that will repair torn, worn or damaged oil seals without gumming up the entire inside of your engine with sludge.. at least none that I am personally aware of...
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

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dingdong
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1993 gl1500
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Re: Lucas Oil Stabilizer

Postby dingdong » Fri Dec 19, 2014 8:19 am

rjbrownley wrote:Has anyone used Lucas oil stabilizer? I had a friend tell me when doing an oil change on my bike (1983 GL1100I) to replace one of the quarts of oil with the Lucas Oil Stabilizer. Suppose to help prevent oil leaks. What do you guys think?


Keyword here is prevent. I'm assuming that you don't have any leaks, just wanting to prevent any. My advice is to let well enough alone and don't waste your money. Just keep your oil changed at regular intervals with a good quality oil and don't worry about it. That said I assume my assumption is correct??
Tom

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rjbrownley
Posts: 34
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 5:53 am
Location: Rochester
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Lucas Oil Stabilizer

Postby rjbrownley » Fri Dec 19, 2014 9:46 pm

Thanks for the replies. I think I agree with both you guys.

f1xrupr
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Location: Triplet Va
Motorcycle: 1980 gl 1100 Std. Vetter

Re: Lucas Oil Stabilizer

Postby f1xrupr » Mon Dec 22, 2014 8:33 am

Well said Hawk.......I like Lucas in some SOLID lifter applications, but, Lucas has a limited amount recommendation for wet clutch applications on the label on the back of the bottle-I think it reads 10% max. I have little confidence in most fixemup additives. A cam seal is not to difficult to change-a crank seal is a little more involved....where is it leaking?
My exercise bike is a goldwing.

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themainviking
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Re: Lucas Oil Stabilizer

Postby themainviking » Mon Dec 22, 2014 2:26 pm

My opinion, and it IS just my opinion, but if your oil does not have adequate additive to work in your engine, use a different oil. Lucas and Wynnes and STP and others are bandaids for improperly formulated oil. Put good oil in to start with and the extras are not needed.
It ain't about the destination - it's all about the journey

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HawkeyeGL1200
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1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Lucas Oil Stabilizer

Postby HawkeyeGL1200 » Mon Dec 22, 2014 4:52 pm

I am guilty of not reading the original question, I suppose. Oil additives (like Lucas I suppose, but I'm unsure because I don't know what it is made up of) probably won't do any better a job of preventing oil leaks than a good quality motor oil, changed at proper intervals.

My favorite oil of all time was Castrol Syntech (I think I spelled it right). It cleaned the inside of crankcase(s) better than anything I've ever used, and it seemed to be (seemed, because I don't have access to hi-tech oil analysis equipment, nor the capabilities of understanding the how of using them) better than any other oil I've used. Having written that, can I say that Syntech would prevent oil leaks? No, I can't... at least no more definitively than any other oil rated for the job I intended them to be used for.

Synthetic oil has the unique ability to provide lubrication at higher temperatures than fossil fuel ginned up lubricating oils, and as a result I'd highly recommend their use in air-cooled applications over conventional oil, based on what I've read about them.

There are MANY great oils on the market (AMSOIL, Mobile 1, and others) that are superior to conventional oils where conditions warrant the additional oil protection beyond what the conventional oil can provide... Again, Harley Davidson engines as an example, where no coolant is present to assist with engine cooling... where oil MAY break down under normal operating conditions... conditions that could prove to be too harsh for out of the ground, unaltered motor oils... In these cases, leaks are more or less the least of our worries, and products that seem to rely on increasing viscosity in order to make the oil "better" aren't the answer either...

So, I would completely agree with what you have written. Oil needs to be up to the job. All the additives in the world won't make bad oil good... Kind of reminds me of Humpty Dumpty... all the King's horses and all the King's men couldn't put Humpty Dumpty back together again.... and adding "good" additives to mediocre oil leaves you with mediocre oil with additives in it... not good oil. Better to put good, or the best, oil in the engine to begin with and leave the additive blending to the guys who know what they're doing.

themainviking wrote:My opinion, and it IS just my opinion, but if your oil does not have adequate additive to work in your engine, use a different oil. Lucas and Wynnes and STP and others are bandaids for improperly formulated oil. Put good oil in to start with and the extras are not needed.


I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.


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