1982 goldwing 1100 interstate


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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ghstrdr
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Apr 04, 2010 10:45 am
Location: durham,nc
Motorcycle: 1982 honda goldwing 1100

1982 goldwing 1100 interstate

Postby ghstrdr » Fri Jun 25, 2010 3:24 pm



I have an '82 goldwing interstate 1100. I need to replace all of the wiring. I was trying to trace the problem, but when I look inside all I can see wires twisted together without being covered and some wires just hanging loose. I have no idea what they should be connected to. It's a bit of a mess. Most of the bike shops in the area don't want to mess with it; consequently they're going to charge an arm and a leg for the work. I've decided to just order harnesses and replace everything. I'm pretty handy with tools and good instructions, but electrical stuff really slows me down. I'm trying to figure out where I can order the wiring harnesses from? Google is giving me a headache with too much information. I found one site, but the wiring was out of stock. I'm thinking that if I get new harnesses then I can just unplug and plug as I go along. Does anyone have any suggestions for a company that makes a complete wiring kit for this bike??

Thanks.



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WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: 1982 goldwing 1100 interstate

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Jun 25, 2010 6:41 pm

New harnesses for the 82? I haven't seen any company that does that. I have seen people selling used harnesses taken out of bikes that are being parted out, however.

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lhelber
Posts: 138
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2010 12:01 am
Location: Webster, NY
Motorcycle: 2012 GL1800 Navi
1983 GL1100A Aspencade

Re: 1982 goldwing 1100 interstate

Postby lhelber » Fri Jun 25, 2010 8:11 pm

I think your best best is to keep an eye on ebay or start looking for motorcycle salvage yards. About the only place you are going to get a full wiring harness is by someone who is parting out a bike. Make sure it is the same year and same model since the harness is different between years and models.

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RBGERSON
Posts: 2621
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:57 am
Location: SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Motorcycle: 98 SE GL 1500
had every year from 75 to 83

Re: 1982 goldwing 1100 interstate

Postby RBGERSON » Sun Jun 27, 2010 8:06 am

I may have one..81 or 82 if I do $30 plus shipping..let me know if I should look...
HAD LOTS OF GOLDWING 75-83
NOW INTO 1500'S..RIDING A 1998 SE

FAIR WINDS,
RB

zvacman
Posts: 102
Joined: Mon May 24, 2010 2:40 pm
Location: Petoskey, MI
Motorcycle: 1982 GL1100 Interstate

Re: 1982 goldwing 1100 interstate

Postby zvacman » Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:21 am

The problem with getting a new harness for these old girls is that 28 years is a long time for the PO to have done a lot of "modifications" for lack of a better word. During my rebuild I found no less than 25 wires that have been modified, twisted together and taped. I went through and soldered and shrink wrapped all of them.

Z

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WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: 1982 goldwing 1100 interstate

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Jun 30, 2010 10:50 am

When I first got my Goldwing, there was a tremendous amount of "extra" wiring with connectors on it. One day I got tired of the mess and started pulling it out, and found a ton of abandoned wiring from previous owners, connected to nothing, and installed very poorly.

I did some work on a friend's bike and found the same thing - the previous owner of her bike had simply twisted wires together and hoped they would stay in place and not short out. No electrical tape, nothing. Amazing.

OK, I'm going to share a wiring secret that I have developed on my own over many years of automotive and motorcycle wiring.

First: heat-shrinking wiring looks great, but heat-shrink is a nightmare to work with, it's easy to melt nearby parts you didn't mean to melt, and it's a real pain to cut off should you want to alter or change the splice in the future. I reserve it for occasional use.

When I splice motorcycle/automotive wiring, I cut and strip the wires, and twist them together - in a "V" for simple splices, or a modified Western Union joint for inline splices. I then solder them completely. Next, if I am doing a "V" splice, I take a piece of electrical tape and fold it over the end, stuck onto itself. Lastly, for both splice types, I take another piece of electrical tape and wrap it around the splice, covering it completely, well onto the wire insulation, and at least 3-4 layers of tape.

None of this is all that secret. The problem is, motorcycles and cars are subject to large fluctuations in temperature. Hot temperatures will melt the adhesive used on electrical tape causing it to release, and subsequent low temperatures causes the tape to get brittle and break. The end result is that the tape will work its way off the splice until it just falls off, leaving the splice uninsulated. The trick is to keep the tape tightly wrapped around the splice so that this doesn't happen.

And this is my secret: Instead of relying on the tape's adhesive to keep the tape tightly wrapped on the splice, I do it mechanically: with a nylon wire tie. After putting the electrical tape on the splice, I wrap a small wire tie around the electrical tape, and pull it tight. I then clip off the excess wire tie. This leaves an extremely solid, insulated splice that will remain that way basically forever. The wire tie keeps the electrical tape from sliding off the splice or unwrapping as the adhesive melts. It also makes the splice easily serviceable: clip the wire tie, cut the tape off (or in some cases just pull it off), and you can work with the splice - cutting it out, adding wires, whatever. When finished, new electrical tape, a new wire tie, and it is good as new again.

zvacman
Posts: 102
Joined: Mon May 24, 2010 2:40 pm
Location: Petoskey, MI
Motorcycle: 1982 GL1100 Interstate

Re: 1982 goldwing 1100 interstate

Postby zvacman » Wed Jun 30, 2010 11:14 am

Hey.....have you been in my garage looking at my bike? I do that exact thing, exact. The only exceptions are:
a) connections that are visable
b) connections I have absolutely no intentions of altering ever
c) connections that are under the seat or under the bike eg. the lights around the side and back.

All of the wiring inside the fairings have the tape and zip ties, good post. A lot of people think that tape has some supernatural ability to last forever. I did however find some underground electrical tape a Lowes or Home Depot that looks like it will last forever. I used it for the wiring on my sprinkler system 10 years ago. I had to dig one up this spring and had a hard time peeling it off of the wires. Downside, it's very expensive!

Z




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