Electric vs mechanical fuel pump


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
DocDan
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:46 am
Location: Milford, KS
Motorcycle: 1982 GL1100

Electric vs mechanical fuel pump

Postby DocDan » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:02 am



I am a new owner of a 1982 GL1100. The previous owner had installed an electric fuel pump when the original failed. I am unfamiliar with doing this to an older bike. I think I would prefer to replace the original, but don't know if this would be "going backward." The bike currently has a power fall-off at 3500RPM, then picks back up at 5000ish. Do any of you think the constant flow of the electric pump could be at fault?


"Dodge, duck, dip, dive and ..... Dodge!"
- the 5 Ds of staff meetings.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17047
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Electric vs mechanical fuel pump

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:06 am

DocDan wrote:I am a new owner of a 1982 GL1100. The previous owner had installed an electric fuel pump when the original failed. I am unfamiliar with doing this to an older bike. I think I would prefer to replace the original, but don't know if this would be "going backward." The bike currently has a power fall-off at 3500RPM, then picks back up at 5000ish. Do any of you think the constant flow of the electric pump could be at fault?


I doubt it. The mechanical fuel pump (which is driven by a the right cam shaft) also provides a constant fuel flow. If the electric pump was not able to keep up with the demands, you would not have it pick back up again. Also, is this just idling in neutral? It actually takes very little fuel to spin the engine up with no load. Where you find a lack in fuel delivery normally is at high speeds, when aerodynamic drag is at its highest, and fuel demand is also at its highest. People will normally say something like "I can't get the bike to go faster than xx mph" - and the problem is normally a fuel restriction (i.e. dirty fuel filter) or failing fuel pump.

User avatar
DocDan
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:46 am
Location: Milford, KS
Motorcycle: 1982 GL1100

Re: Electric vs mechanical fuel pump

Postby DocDan » Fri Nov 13, 2015 1:10 pm

Unfortunately, the loss of power occurs at both idle and while driving. Fortunately, if your patient, once it hits 5000RPM, it will easily get up to highway speeds, 75+.
"Dodge, duck, dip, dive and ..... Dodge!"
- the 5 Ds of staff meetings.

User avatar
RBGERSON
Posts: 2622
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:57 am
Location: SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Motorcycle: 98 SE GL 1500
had every year from 75 to 83

Re: Electric vs mechanical fuel pump

Postby RBGERSON » Sat Nov 14, 2015 8:14 am

Well..if the electric pump doesn't have a auto-shutoff if the bike goes down I'd either replace the it with an OEM pump or install a shut-off..New pumps are still available from Honda $90 with shipping or so and used ones on eBay..and they can be rebuilt but it's not a simple process, how to's on the NGW site. I have some working used pumps $55 with shipping in the USA.

PM me if you are interested in a used one.
HAD LOTS OF GOLDWING 75-83
NOW INTO 1500'S..RIDING A 1998 SE

FAIR WINDS,
RB

f1xrupr
Posts: 396
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 6:13 am
Location: Triplet Va
Motorcycle: 1980 gl 1100 Std. Vetter

Re: Electric vs mechanical fuel pump

Postby f1xrupr » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:06 pm

I'm running an e-pump on my 1100-was on it when I got it-works great. I installed a safety shut-off (oil pressure switch). As mentioned, would be bad in a accident without one.


My exercise bike is a goldwing.


Return to “GL1100 Information & Questions”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Overdog and 1 guest