Winter maintenance log, or blog


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Feb 24, 2009 4:26 pm



I'm doing a fair bit of winter maintenance on my GL1100A this year. I've decided this year is the year I'm going to pull a lot apart and freshen up a lot of 25-year-old parts.

My plan is to, in no particular order:

  • Repair malfunctioning radio tuner
  • Add quick-disconnect/bypass for satellite radio interface
  • Repair/replace malfunctioning CB tuner
  • Tune CB antenna
  • Waterproof and move voltmeter/temperature gauge
  • Flush brakes
  • Replace clutch cable
  • Replace choke cable
  • Replace throttle cables
  • Replace handgrips
  • Replace coolant
  • Replace brake lines with braided stainless
  • Replace brake shoes, front and rear
  • Rebuilt front and rear master cylinders
  • Rebuild front and rear calipers
  • Replace front tire
  • Replace handgrips
  • Drain and fill rear drive gear oil
  • Disassemble and lubricate rear drive spline
  • Grease pinion gear
  • Replace all rubber grommets
  • Add trunk rack
  • Replace windshield with taller, wraparound windshield
  • Repair seat
  • Move satellite radio antenna
  • Remove unused/abandoned wiring
  • Rewire main fuse block accessory wiring
  • Add sidestand warning light
  • Replace air filter
  • Replace fuel filter
  • Replace flasher with solid state unit for future LED's
  • Synchronize carburetors
  • Install hard-wired trickle charger
  • Lubricate everything!
  • Clean everything!

Of these, I have completed:

  • Repair malfunctioning radio tuner (well, I've sent it off to Sierra Electronics, and they are repairing it - there are no schematics that I have found for this radio, so it's kind of tough to fix it myself).
  • Add quick-disconnect/bypass for satellite radio interface - I needed to do this because I had hard-wired (soldered) my satellite radio wiring directly into the radio, so that I could switch between my radio and my satellite radio. In order to send my radio off to Sierra to be repaired, I had to disconnect it - and figure out a way to bypass my addition, so they could work on it. When I get it back, I can just plug it right back into my bike and not have to re-solder it in like I did before.
  • Repair/replace malfunctioning CB tuner - I had access to a second tuner, so I replaced the one I had (which would receive, but wouldn't transmit). It now works great!
  • Tune CB antenna - I bought an SWR meter for $20 on eBay, and these cables from Sierra Electronics to hook up the SWR meter to the Goldwing. Underneath the fairing on the left side, behind the lower fairing cover, the antenna splitter connects to the lead from the antenna. Disconnect this and plug the SWR meter in line with it. Some good documentation on tuning the antenna can be found here.
  • Waterproof and move voltmeter/temperature gauge - I had put this unit on my Goldwing a couple of years ago. The problem is, I mounted it on my false tank, and it is not even remotely waterproof. I pulled it off the bike this year, took it apart, and reassembled it, after I coated the electronics and glued the case together to make it more water resistant. I'm going to mount it up high under the windshield to give it a better chance of not being soaked in rain.
  • Flush brakes - I should have done this AFTER I did the new brake lines and shoes, but when I did the flush, I hadn't decided yet to do the brake lines. Oh well, brake fluid is cheap.
  • Replace clutch cable - Not knowing how old the cables on my bike were, I decided to replace them - especially the clutch cable, which gets more work than any other cable. I found all the cables online on Puget Sound Motorcycles' eBay store at a very good price. I did the clutch cable first. Before replacing it, I filled the cable with synthetic 10W30 (Mobil 1). This keeps the cable lubricated, and the synthetic oil doesn't thicken up at cold temperatures like regular oil. I undid both ends, tied a string to the lever end, and pulled the old cable out. I then tied the string to the new cable, and pulled it back through the bike - thus ensuring that the new cable was routed exactly the same way as the old cable. I wrote up a How To on replacing your clutch cable, you can read it here.
  • Replace choke cable - the choke cable on my bike was broken, and was being held in place with a wire tie. I replaced it the same way I did the clutch cable. I wrote up a How To on replacing your choke cable, you can read it here.
  • Repair seat - My seat had a tear in the side, where an incorrect bolt on the front seat back was rubbing it when it was flipped forward. I bought a $10 vinyl repair kit from Wal-Mart, and while the repair isn't perfect - it's not visible unless you look closely, and most of the time it will be covered up by the bar supporting the seat back.
  • Move satellite radio antenna - I had mounted the satellite antenna on the underside of the trunk lid. This kept it out of sight. Problem was, whenever my wife rode on the back, and we were riding South, she blocked the satellite signal. I removed the satellite antenna from the trunk, pulled all the wiring out, and I'm going to mount it high inside the front fairing, above the headlight.
  • Remove unused/abandoned wiring - There's a lot of abandoned, useless and messy wiring in my bike. It's all coming out and being redone, so I have a chance of figuring out what is connected to what in the future.
  • Rewire main fuse block accessory wiring - There was just a mess of wires all connected to the single accessory terminal on the main fuse block, spidering out in every direction. No longer.
  • Clean everything! - The underside of the bike (inside covers, under the seat, etc - places you don't normally wash) is absolutely filthy, covered with years of dirt and grime. I bet I remove several pounds of weight from the bike by the time I'm done!

As I proceed on this project, I'll post updates and pictures. If you have questions or comments, please post them!

The current state of my bike:



The current state of my dining room:




User avatar
detdrbuzzard
Posts: 919
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 5:54 am
Location: 42.23/83.33/636
Motorcycle: '84 aspencade,'93se
'75750.'79750/9k
'79 750f.'85450sc
'06 st1300a

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby detdrbuzzard » Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:26 pm

i can only dream about doing maintinance as none of my bikes are kept at home for the winter but i'll be very backed up with work in the spring. hope you get all yours done before riding season
'99 ST1100, '93 se
'75 cb750k, '79 cb 750f, '79 cb750 superK
cb 450sc, sunL70
'06 st1300a
.... william

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Feb 24, 2009 7:59 pm

detdrbuzzard wrote:i can only dream about doing maintinance as none of my bikes are kept at home for the winter but i'll be very backed up with work in the spring. hope you get all yours done before riding season


This is the first year I've done any real serious winter maintenance, because I installed a heater in my garage a month ago - I always had good intentions previously, but working on my bike when the tools keep freezing to your fingers is just discouraging. Now I can heat it up to 65 or 70 degrees in there and be comfortable working in a T-shirt.

I just realized that I somehow deleted half the items I plan to work on - so I just edited it and put them back in. I'm not so worried about the time getting it done as I am with the money it costs to replace all this stuff! I'm trying to do it gradually and spread the cost out a bit.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Feb 28, 2009 7:23 pm

Well today I got the throttle cables replaced, as well as the fuel filter. The throttle cables were not a simple task - it involves working in some very confined spaces, but everything went OK, and I now have a new silky smooth throttle. Being as I was right next to it anyway, I figured it was a good time to do the fuel filter as well.

I took lots of pictures of it all, and I'm going to post them as a "how to" here as I get the time.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Mar 01, 2009 11:01 am

Alright, I wrote up four "how to's" based on some of my work so far:

How to change your throttle cables

How to change your choke cable

How to change your clutch cable

How to change your fuel filter

I'll keep writing more as I do them. The current state of my bike:


User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:05 pm

Well, after a week off from a nasty head cold, I spent a day this past weekend working on the Wing. Here's what I got done:

  • Repair malfunctioning radio tuner: I received my radio tuner back from Sierra Electronics, and installed it back into the fairing. Once I had reconnected the multitude of various connectors to wire the whole mess back together, it all worked great!
  • Waterproof and move voltmeter/temperature gauge: I finished fabricating a mount so that it would mount to the bottom of my left speaker. I put it in place, pulled the wires through, and hooked it all up.
  • Move satellite radio antenna: I used some weatherproof sealant/adhesive to fasten the satellite radio antenna to the top of the right speaker, where it works perfectly. After that, I put the satellite radio back onto the bike and wired it in when I wired the radio tuner back in, just to make sure everything was working correctly.
  • Rebuild front and rear master cylinders: I rebuilt the front master cylinder. It was not in terrible shape, but it did have a bit of corrosion on the outer part, so it did need it. I took pictures as I did it, and posted a new How to rebuild your front master cylinder article in the How To section.
  • Rebuild front and rear calipers: I rebuilt both front calipers. Both calipers definitely were in need of rebuilding. The outer seals were all but destroyed, and had let a lot of dirt past into the cylinder, which scored and corroded the piston. There was "grey gunk" inside the cylinder that needed to be cleaned out. The slider boots were torn. I took pictures as I did it, and posted a new How to rebuild your front calipers article in the How To section.
  • Replace brake lines with braided stainless: As I pulled each front caliper off, I replaced its 30-year-old rubber brake line with a new stainless line. I used a kit from Venco Wings that included all the brake lines for the entire bike. I did the same when I pulled the master cylinder off, so now my front brake system has all braided stainless brake lines. I'll start working on the rear next weekend.
  • Replace brake shoes, front and rear: I put new brake shoes from Cyclemax in the front calipers when I rebuilt them. I can't say enough about the great people at Cyclemax! They are truly a first-rate Wing vendor.
  • Flush brakes: I obviously had to do this (again) when I replaced the brake lines and rebuilt the master cylinder and calipers. The Goldwing has brakes that are notoriously hard to bleed. However, using a MityVac that I purchased at Harbor Freight, it made the job relatively easy:
    1. Fill the master cylinder reservoir
    2. Crack left bleeder. Use Mity-vac to suck on caliper until fluid comes out. Seal bleeder.
    3. Refill the master cylinder reservoir
    4. Crack right bleeder. Use Mity-vac to suck on caliper until fluid comes out. Seal bleeder.
    5. Refill the master cylinder reservoir
    6. Pump brake until no more bubbles appear in reservoir
    7. Repeat steps 2-6 two or three times until you have a solid brake and no more air bubbles.
    When finished, I wrapped a bungee cord around the brake lever to hold the brake on, and left it overnight. The next morning I pumped the brake a few more times to remove any last air bubbles, and I was done - rock solid brakes, with no air. I'm VERY impressed with the difference the braided lines have made. I can't wait to ride with the new brakes. I'm sure it will make a huge difference on my rear brake as well, which is quite spongy.

Next weekend: The last of the electricals (I hope), and rear brakes!

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Mar 22, 2009 10:54 pm

Well this weekend is now over, and I'm sore! But I got a lot done.

The bad news: I didn't touch any electricals this weekend. The good news: I got lots of other stuff done.

This weekend I:

  • Flushed cooling system and replaced coolant
  • Replaced radiator hoses
  • Replaced rear brake lines with braided stainless
  • Replaced brake shoes
  • Rebuilt rear master cylinder
  • Rebuilt rear caliper
  • Replaced all rubber grommets
  • Replaced air filter
  • Install hard-wired trickle charger
  • Lubricated side stand and center stand
  • Cleaned everything

I also found four very loose nuts: The jam/lock nut on the kickstand had backed off and was almost gone (tightend and loc-tited it), the nut holding the left exhaust to the frame next to the rear wheel was not even finger-tight (tightened it), a nut holding the left rear passenger footboard was backed off and almost gone (tightened it), and the upper right nut holding the radiator in place was gone (replaced both upper nuts with locknuts). Because of this, I plan to go over the entire bike front to back, top to bottom, and check every nut and bolt for looseness.

Remaining things to do:

  • Replace handgrips
  • Replace front tire
  • Drain and fill rear drive gear oil
  • Disassemble and lubricate rear drive spline
  • Grease pinion gear
  • Add trunk rack
  • Replace windshield with taller, wraparound windshield
  • Add sidestand warning light
  • Replace flasher with solid state unit for future LED's
  • Synchronize carburetors
  • Replace front and rear wheel bearings
  • Install brake light flasher module

I know this list seems to continually grow, but I do think I'm finally nearing the end, and I think if I spend a couple nights this week working on it, I may be able to finish it all this next weekend. I've got all the parts I need except for the windshield, which I expect to order tomorrow, and the front tire, which I think I may defer for a few months. Oh, and the trunk rack, which I think I may put off indefinitely, simply because I don't think I really need it right now.

I bought a brake light flasher module on eBay. I had a different one before, but it failed, so I took it out. The wiring is still there to put it in, so it should be a simple thing to install this one. I also have some new, improved LED brake lights on order that are supposed to be 5 times brighter than the ones I have in there now, which is always a good thing.

And last, but certainly not least...as promised, I've documented everything I did along the way, so that anyone who wants to attempt it in the future can at least see how I managed to stumble my way through. They're all documented in my "How To" articles, which you can see here.

I have now posted:

  • How to rebuild your rear master cylinder
  • How to rebuild your rear brake caliper
  • How to replace your radiator hoses
  • How to flush your cooling system
  • How to replace your air filter
  • How to lubricate your center stand
  • How to lubricate your (side) kickstand
  • How to rebuild your front master cylinder
  • How to rebuild your front brake calipers
  • How to change your Fuel Filter
  • How to change your Throttle Cables
  • How to change your Clutch Cable
  • How to change your Choke Cable

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Mar 29, 2009 11:39 pm

Well another long weekend of maintenance...and I'm getting SO close to riding again!

This weekend I got finished:

  • Replace handgrips
  • Drain and fill rear drive gear oil
  • Disassemble and lubricate rear drive spline
  • Grease pinion gear
  • Add sidestand warning light
  • Replace front and rear wheel bearings
  • Install brake light flasher module

Which means, the only things left on my list are:

  • Replace front tire
  • Add trunk rack
  • Replace windshield with taller, wraparound windshield
  • Replace flasher with solid state unit for future LED's
  • Synchronize carburetors

The front tire, upon closer inspection, I have decided is going to wait, I suspect it will be fine for this year, and I'll watch it to make sure, just in case. So strike that off the list. The trunk rack...I'm still on the fence, I guess I'll leave it on for now. The windshield has been ordered and should be arriving here Tuesday. The flasher is also on order and should arrive this week as well. And to synchronize the carbs, I need the bike warm, so I have to ride it for that.

I am going to look at doing one more thing, and that is to put lights behind the red reflectors mounted on the saddlebags, so they light up as well as reflect. I don't know if I'm going to be able to do that with what I have, so I'll just have to wait and see on that one. I probably have about an hour to reinstall the compressor on the bike, and about half an hour to get the tank, fairing lowers, saddlebag and seat back on. All told, if it's going to be nice weather next weekend, I should be riding!

I did take a couple hundred pictures of everything I did this weekend, so over the next few days there will be more "How To's" appearing in the How To section.

Incidentally...the new bearings in the rear wheel have made a HUGE difference! Here's how she looked this weekend:




User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:51 am

Strike one more off the list...my new Slipstreamer Wraparound windshield arrived yesterday, so I installed it last night. Can't wait to try it out!

I posted my experience installing it here.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Apr 06, 2009 11:25 am

An hour spent on Sunday putting together my fresh-from-Harbor-Freight vacuum gauges on a board, along with my fishing tank valves (I'll post about it soon), then hooking it up and syncing my carbs, and I officially declare my winter maintenance complete. I do still need to put the tank and bags back on, but that's just some minor reassembly.

I also received my solid-state flasher that I bought online from superbrightleds.com, and it installed quickly and easily as well, so I can replace my turn signals with bright LEDs in future, without having to use load resistors (which negate the power savings benefit of LEDs). Another benefit: If a turn signal light burns out, the flasher will actually keep flashing, unlike the old mechanical unit.

As a direct result of the completion of my 2008-2009 winter maintenance, it is now snowing, and the forecast is for snow for the next five days. :(

I will post my "carb sync" and "tank removal" How-To's later on this week. I also am still thinking about putting lights behind my reflectors - I haven't 100% decided to do it yet (it's a little more complex than I originally thought, due to clearance issues), but if I do, I'll of course post pictures etc.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Apr 17, 2009 11:01 am

Well I finally got the time last night to do the final reassembly of my bike - put the false tank back on, replace the seat and bags. The tank was frankly, a pain the ass to do...primarily because of the stupid way Honda shoved the air suspension compressor system into there, and how the hoses keep things from moving. But I did get it done (and took pictures, so I'll post a How To on it, hopefully tonight if I get time) before dark.

I started the bike up, and while it was warming up...I noticed the headlight was off. Tried the high beam...no joy there, either. Damn.

I shut down, popped the tank cover, and pulled the fuse cover off. I took my meter and measured the voltage on both ends of the 10 amp headlight fuse. One side showed 12 volts...the other side: 0 volts. I pulled the fuse...but it didn't look blown. I checked it with my meter, and it showed continuity. Hmm...perhaps while I was messing around putting the false tank in place, I bumped the fuse? I put it back in, and the headlight came on just fine. I buttoned everything back up.

I got out and did some gentle test rides around the block. The brakes were a bit surprising - one of the front discs was grabbing more than the other, so the first time I hit the front brakes, the bike tried to turn itself left. I spent some time doing some hard stops to seat the new brakes in, and within a few minutes the left turning tendency disappeared.

A few snags showed up right away: the rear brake pedal was too low, the center voltage gauge illumination light wasn't illuminating, and the throttle had too much free play. I came back in, adjusted the throttle and the rear brake, and deferred the illumination (I may have forgotten to reconnect the wires inside the fairing when I had the gauge pod off while changing the windshield).

By then it was dark. I went out for a short ride, and everything seemed to work great! Some things I noticed:

  • The throttle seems much smoother in feel than it used to
  • The clutch also feels much smoother (thanks to new cables, I expect)
  • The brakes are incredible! They are solid and strong, and made the old brakes seem positively spongy in comparison.
  • The new windshield is great - the wind and buffeting behind it is MUCH reduced, and I'm sure my wife will appreciate the lack of buffeting when she rides. I'm wondering how hot it will be however. It is tall, but I can just see over it if I sit up very high in my seat.
  • The CB, now that I have set the SWR on it (look for another future How To on this), works amazingly well. I was able to raise some truck drivers instantly, who told me that it "sounded great for a bike." He was unaware I was on a bike until I told him.

And now...the rest of the story.

While doing my winter maintenance, most of the bodywork (fairing lowers, bags, false tank, seat, etc) took up residence in my dining room. The dining room is off-limits to my dog. While going back and forth between the dining room and the garage as I reassembled the bike, I left the dining room open...and forgot to close it up when I left on my test ride. When I got back, I found my dog, thief extraordinaire, with her stolen prize:



It must have smelled good, and she knew she had to get the cap off to get to what she wanted inside...but unfortunately (for her), dog teeth just can't beat opposable thumbs:



So I uncapped it myself and toasted in her honor, this year's winter motorcycle maintenance officially complete!

biggsxr
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2009 4:40 pm
Location: United States

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby biggsxr » Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:46 am

Wow,

Thanks so much for the wealth of information!
I'm an experienced bike mechanic, but it is awesome to have pics & tips from someone who has been there.

I'm taking a 3rd week long trip on a borrowed GL1800, and I have decided I must get my own wing.
Trying to spend less than 2K on a mechanically distressed, yet cosmetically superior example.

This site is proving to be a great help in making a decision based on model!!

THANKS!!!

Paul
Columbia, MO

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Winter maintenance log, or blog

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Jul 16, 2009 1:08 pm

You are likely looking at a GL1100 (or a GL1200 in very bad shape) for that price range...I think, however, you'll have more trouble finding a "mechanically distressed" bike that is cosmetically in great shape. The bikes that people take care of (keeping the appearance up) tend to just keep running by their very nature. The bikes that are in poor shape mechanically are those that have been left sitting out in a field, in the back of a garage, etc. for several years, and their appearance also reflects this fact.

That said, I don't think you'll have much problem finding a decent bike for what you're looking to pay.




Return to “GL1100 Information & Questions”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Johnyy Smoke, Yahoo Slurp [Bot] and 3 guests