Brake bleeding


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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Wilcoy02
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:37 pm
Location: Marengo, Ohio
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 I purchased 3/16

1983 GL1100I frame with an 80 engine. poor boy installed with C-5 ignition--DIED in Grande Prairie Alberta Canada 8/15


98 valkyrie sold 8/16

Brake bleeding

Postby Wilcoy02 » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:05 pm



83 1100. I took all 3 calipers off and rebuilt them along with both master cylinders.
I got the front handle to brake the front tire. The linked front and back I can not get it to bleed. The master cylinder does not push any fluid through the line.
The mighty vac can not get any fluid to come through the lines front or back.
The might vac does work as when I put the end into the fluid reservoir it sucks it dry right now.

Any clue as to what I need to do?



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maintainer
Posts: 291
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2015 11:39 am
Location: Houston, Texas
Motorcycle: 1977 GL 1000
1982 GL 1100 Interstate (Sold)

Re: Brake bleeding

Postby maintainer » Sun Apr 03, 2016 7:53 pm

What I do know about an 83 I have read about. 1983 GL 1000 introduced a linked braking system which utilizes something akin to a proportioning valve that causes the front and rear brakes share the front master cylinder and to work together. Bleeding the system because of this linked system requires a very specific bleeding sequence and can't be done well if at all, using typical bleeding of separated front and rear braking systems. I don't know the proper sequence it is likely in the service manual or may be found online.
1982 GL 1100 Interstate SOLD
1977 GL 1000 Standard (naked can be good, who knew?)

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bruce swaybill
Posts: 64
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:26 pm
Location: farmington, ct
Motorcycle: 1983 gl1100i interstate

Re: Brake bleeding

Postby bruce swaybill » Mon Apr 11, 2016 9:47 pm

I would suggest "reverse bleeding" the system. There are many videos on YouTube for this. Basically, you pump the fluid from the caliper up to the master cylinder. This seems to work better at removing air bubbles since the fluid is flowing upward.

Since you are starting with fresh fluid, you would remove almost all the master cylinder reservoir fluid with a syringe, then with the same or different syringe pump it into the bleeder port of the caliper, filling the reservoir (careful not to spill!)

With the linked brakes, I would recommend reverse bleeding the rear twice, then the front twice, then the rear twice again, then the front twice again. Check the feel of the brake pedal after each step, It should start to get stiffer after the first two steps. If it does not, repeat until it does.

BTW, when I rebuilt my brake system, I separated (unlinked) the front and rear, removed all of the hard lines and replaced them with new SS lines plus I ran two lines directly from the front master cylinder to the two to the front calipers. The device some people have referred to as a proportioning device in the linked system is actually just a "T" or splitter between the hard brake lines of the master cylinder output to the two calipers, front and rear.

In the end, your brakes should be much better and provide more confidence in your stopping ability.
I love projects that lead to improvements, and not just repairs to the status quo.

Bruce S.
Have a nice day! :)

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bruce swaybill
Posts: 64
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:26 pm
Location: farmington, ct
Motorcycle: 1983 gl1100i interstate

Re: Brake bleeding

Postby bruce swaybill » Tue Apr 12, 2016 8:13 pm

I read your original post again, and it seems that the master cylinder is not pumping any fluid. The pedal will not have any resistance until the line is full of fluid. Make sure only one bleeder is open at a time. Does the pedal feel hard or soft while pumping? If it is hard, then maybe one of the two orifices at the master cylinder is clogged....

Reverse bleeding might clear up the problem quickly. Mine pumped very easily, so I might recommend the next step after attempting to reverse bleed, to disassemble the rear master cylinder again to make sure is was cleaned and assembled correctly. Pictures of what you find will us diagnose the issue further.

Bruce S.
Have a nice day! :)

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Wilcoy02
Posts: 726
Joined: Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:37 pm
Location: Marengo, Ohio
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100 I purchased 3/16

1983 GL1100I frame with an 80 engine. poor boy installed with C-5 ignition--DIED in Grande Prairie Alberta Canada 8/15


98 valkyrie sold 8/16

Re: Brake bleeding

Postby Wilcoy02 » Tue Apr 12, 2016 9:06 pm

both masters were taken apart and re-rebuilt. A friend did them and I just got them back tonight. Will install in the morning and see if they work.
Also bought new line from the rear reservoir to the master.

Will tell you what I find tomorrow. Thanks for all the help. It makes a problem more bearable when someone else has gone thru the same problem in the past.

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DaveDanger
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 2:12 pm
Location: Columbus, Georgia
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100A Aspencade

Re: Brake bleeding

Postby DaveDanger » Mon May 02, 2016 9:50 pm

Wilcoy02, I went thru all the heartaches with the brake system on my 83 GL1100A back when I was returning it to running condition (Had been garaged for 7 or 8 years). Look at my earliest posts to see my odyssey, and photos as well. The very first thing I did was remove and rebuild my rear master & wheel cylinder, due to it locking into full on brake mode when the pedal was depressed. It would not release pressure, unless I cracked the brake hose open (The bleeder nipple could not be freed up). Turned out, I not only had a seized caliper bleeder, I had the old 30+ year old OEM rubber hoses which were swollen internally (Swollen shut!), The master cylinder had the pressure to push fluid out to the brake caliper thru the swollen shut hoses, but it wouldn't return the fluid on its own, and the TINY orifice inside the master cylinder that allows fluid to return to the master cylinder was corroded shut.
I ended up having to buy a used rear wheel cylinder on eBay, rebuilt that. Ordered and installed ALL new Stainless hoses front and rear. Rebuilt the master cylinder and finally succeeded in opening that tiny orifice (Managed to embarrass myself there). Disassembled completely the proportioning valve (I promise you, it is not simply a tee-connection) and not being able to obtain a rebuild kit for it, glass-bead blasted it inside and out, and polished and reassembled with all the existing seals & o-rings (lubed to death with silicone grease) and then began bleeding. I had zero problems bleeding, proportioning valve or not.... but I use a method that I developed working with aircraft and automobiles, because I almost never have anyone to assist. It's not complicated and works very well, and is EASY. http://goldwingdocs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=13107

Decided to go ahead and copy over the bleeding details rather than make you read thru that entire post topic... There are some good photos there however:)

I bled my brakes using a technique I've used for years and recommended on several mechanical forums... motorcycle, & automotive. Lots of people complain that it's difficult to get air out of brake systems. It's not difficult to do and takes almost nothing special in the way of tools or equipment.

3/16" ID clear vinyl tubing is available for about .25 cents a foot in 10 or 20 foot lengths in the plumbing department at Home Depot or Lowes and most hardware stores. A snug fit on the bleeder nipple is desired, but not so tight you have difficulty pushing it on. A 10' length is more than sufficient for any motorcycle. Cut the tubing in half and use one or both pieces as needed. For bleeding my combined rear/Rh front system, I used both pieces simultaneously, placing an 8mm boxed end wrench on both bleeder nipples first, then pressing one end of each of the tubes over the respective bleeder nipples. To flush any old residual fluid from the system, I first place the open ends of both pieces of tubing into a container, and crack both bleeder nipples open. I fill the reservoir with fluid and begin to slowly and steadily pump the pedal, keeping an eye on the reservoir and refilling before it runs empty. The fluid flushing thru the system empties into the container allowing the fluid to be watched until clean & clear fluid is all that is seen. At that point, place both open tubing ends into the reservoir, and continue to pump the pedal. There is no need to pump up pressure, then open/close the bleeder nipple over and over. You simply pump the pedal and watch the fluid circulate completely thru the system and back into the reservoir. When you no longer see air bubbles pumping thru the vinyl tubing, you no longer have any air in the system. This can be done with both bleeders open, or with one open and one closed, then reversing the bleeders. Makes no difference, as long as fluid is circulating, air is carried out to the reservoir and you see it happen. When it's finished, close both bleeder nipples and test the pedal pressure... should be firm and solid. Works fine for the single hand brake also, same process. With the combined front and rear, or unified system... you ABSOLUTELY HAVE to bleed both lines and calipers, either simultaneously, or separately, but they both must be bled, or some amount of air bubbles are guaranteed to remain in the lines.
I have used this technique on cars, trucks, airplanes & motorcycles. It's very simple and the easiest thing is that it can be performed by one person, no extra hands needed.
I have noticed on occasion, that while using this process, the air bubbles will usually flow towards the reservoir during the pedal pump, and reverse flow towards the caliper on the pedal release, but the fluid and air always flows further towards the reservoir with each pedal pump, than backwards. Don't allow the reverse bubble flow to confuse you, simply continue pumping and the air will purge out. The pedal pumping process seems to me to work better when done slowly and steadily, whereas, fast pumping seems to create very fine tiny bubbles in the fluid, which takes much longer to purge out.
SpeedBleeders improve this technique by not allowing the fluid and air bubbles to ever flow backwards :)

Read more: viewtopic.php?t=13107&start=25#ixzz47Yf7zwjO


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