Findings inside starter


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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DCoxson1969
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 12:35 pm
Location: United States
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100 Interstate

Findings inside starter

Postby DCoxson1969 » Tue Jun 14, 2011 7:25 am



I had an issue with burning up starter soleinods and decided to tear down the starter. I found a couple things inside and wanted to share with you all to see if what I found makes sence with the problems I had. Of course it was full of carbon which your how to article said there would be. I also found two problems with the positive side brush and brush plate. First, when I took the two end caps off the brush plate fell out. Looks like the wire coming from the main body of the starter came loose right at the connection to the + side of the brigh plate. You could see where arching was going on. Also, the insulation on the wires of the positive brush was gone completely, which I am guessing could cause it to ground out. Well I fixed the connection at the main wire and have new brushes on order. Already cleaned the whole starter and repacked the grease waiting for reassembly. Does it sound like I am on the right track?


FIREFIGHTER: Busting mine to save yours!

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RBGERSON
Posts: 2625
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:57 am
Location: SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Motorcycle: 98 SE GL 1500
had every year from 75 to 83

Re: Findings inside starter

Postby RBGERSON » Tue Jun 14, 2011 8:43 am

Yes, but clean the commutator and the grooves. Check the continuity or lack there of, of all the pads.
HAD LOTS OF GOLDWING 75-83
NOW INTO 1500'S..RIDING A 1998 SE

FAIR WINDS,
RB

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DCoxson1969
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 12:35 pm
Location: United States
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Findings inside starter

Postby DCoxson1969 » Tue Jun 14, 2011 8:58 am

I did clean it well. what is the right way to check the pads? Thank you for your time.
FIREFIGHTER: Busting mine to save yours!

User avatar
RBGERSON
Posts: 2625
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:57 am
Location: SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Motorcycle: 98 SE GL 1500
had every year from 75 to 83

Re: Findings inside starter

Postby RBGERSON » Wed Jun 15, 2011 8:49 am

Check the continuity between all of the commutator segments pad to pad.
There should be continuity. If one pair gives a high reading (No continuity) there may be an open circuit. Now check for continuity between the segments and the armature shaft. There should be none. In the old days, they had a tool called a "Growler" to test the armatures, but again, if your not doing a lot of them, it's not much use to have one. If the commutator looks a bit dull or burned, it won't hurt to shine it up a bit with a fine grade of sand paper. They say don't use Emory paper. There is a chance the hard particles will become embedded in the surface of the commutator and wear the brushes out (Like sand paper has no hard particles ?). However, I'm sitting here looking at three different starter manuals and one says use Emory paper (Chilton), one says don't, use sandpaper instead (Haynes) and one says don't use any (Honda Factory). Instead use a file ! Me ? I usually use sandpaper. It's cheaper, but if the truth be known, I really use whatever fine paper my hand hits first when I reach inside my sandpaper storage box. However, the file thing sounds even cheaper, provided you don't file any flat spots on the commutator ! Take your pick, I really don't think it matters which method you use.

Check for continuity between the starter cable or terminal bolt, on the side of the starter, and the brush that is wired to the end of the stator coil, also called field or pole coil. That is the coil(s) bolted to the yoke or starter body. If there is no continuity, the wire is shorted and the coil needs to be replaced.

Most starter motors have four poles (field coils) and four brushes. Some have only two brushes, but that really loads the brushes heavily. Some sparking, while running, at the brushes, is normal. Heavy sparking should be looked into.


Starter brushes need to be measured and compared with the minimum measurement given in the shop manual. If you don't have this spec, just look art them. If they "Seem" too short, be they probably are ! If they "Seem" long enough and there is good spring pressure, pushing them against the commutator, they should be OK. If you can't get the right replacement brush, try to find ones that are a about the right size, only bigger, and file them down. Carbons carbon so they should work OK. The important thing is that the carbon brushes press tightly against the commutator. If they don't, the current will not pass through them properly.

Don't run the starter, on the bench, more then a second or two without a load on it. They can really rev up and they are not designed to run at high speeds.

Don't ever run an electric starter, under load, for a long period of time. Run them no longer then five or ten seconds. They heat up and can burn out one of their coils. Run it for five seconds and then stop and wait for one minute before running it again. This lets the starter cool down. If it won't start, find out why. Don't just keep cranking it.
HAD LOTS OF GOLDWING 75-83
NOW INTO 1500'S..RIDING A 1998 SE

FAIR WINDS,
RB

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DCoxson1969
Posts: 76
Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 12:35 pm
Location: United States
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Findings inside starter

Postby DCoxson1969 » Wed Jun 15, 2011 9:16 am

Outstanding advice, I will do the checks you talked about. I find it amazing the amount of help you get and so quickly on this forum. Every time I have posted a question, some one has an answer for me in a matter of hours or minutes some times. Thank you again for your time...


FIREFIGHTER: Busting mine to save yours!


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