Clutch Slave Bleeding question


Information and questions on GL1200 Goldwings (1984-1987)
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harkgold
Posts: 147
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:19 pm
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate

Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby harkgold » Thu May 31, 2012 4:29 pm



I have just completed rebuilding and bleeding the entire brake system on my '84 GL1200 Interstate. No more bubbles and a nice firm lever and peddle.

I'm now working on bleeding the slave piston on my clutch.
It's going slow and I'm still getting a lot of bubbles in the clear rubber tubing. I wrapped the bleed nipple in Teflon tape so I don't think I'm getting bubbles around the bleed tube, plus the fact that I am drawing brake fluid from the caliper reservoir and moving it through the system leads me to believe there is still air in the line. I will continue to move fluid through the system until no bubbles are seen. Does it help to break the bubbles loose from the walls of the hose by tapping on the brake line?

The clutch lever is a little firmer than it was when I began the bleeding process, but since I have only owned cable operated motorcycle clutches before I have no idea what a hydraulic clutch is supposed to feel like in the hand, or know how to tell if it is operating the clutch properly. Also, will I still be able to feather the clutch like with a cable operated system? Should the clutch lever feel just like a hydraulic brake lever......firm and gradually harder as pulled in; and should I be able to pull the clutch lever all the way to the grip?

Thanks,

Harkgold



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WingAdmin
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Re: Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby WingAdmin » Thu May 31, 2012 9:38 pm

The clutch should feel just like a cable clutch - consistent all the way to the lever, just a bit smoother (and perhaps a touch easier) than a cable clutch.

There isn't a lot of area to hold air in the clutch system, so if you've drawn a reasonable amount of fluid, you shouldn't have any air remaining. Try tying the clutch lever to the handlegrip and leaving it overnight, then give it another try. Also be careful to pour any fresh brake fluid into the reservoir carefully, to avoid introducing air bubbles.

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seabee_
Posts: 494
Joined: Sun May 29, 2011 8:17 pm
Location: sterling heights, mi
Motorcycle: 1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
117k miles
1977 Kawasaki kz400
1978 Suzuki GSXr750
1980 Kawasaki GPZ400
1975 Honda CB360T

Re: Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby seabee_ » Thu May 31, 2012 10:44 pm

Here is a tutorial on bleeding the clutch with step by step pics and a video. See if this might be helpful. I agree with Wingadmin with the tip.

Oops, forgot to add the link. :o
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwingclutchbleeding.htm
Paul
CE1 Navy Seabees/RET
1981 to 2002
ASE Mechanic

harkgold
Posts: 147
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:19 pm
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate

Re: Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby harkgold » Fri Jun 01, 2012 11:09 am

seabee_ wrote:Here is a tutorial on bleeding the clutch with step by step pics and a video. See if this might be helpful. I agree with Wingadmin with the tip.

Oops, forgot to add the link. :o
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwingclutchbleeding.htm


THANKS SEABEE AND WINGADMIN FOR THE INFO! THIS LOOKS LIKE A WINNER!
I WILL GO TO WORK ON IT TODAY.
I took Wingadmin's advice and tied down the clutch lever and left it over night and found that it did make a very slight difference.
IF THE CLUTCH IS FINALLY WORKING CORRECTLY CAN I TEST IT BY PUTTING THE BIKE IN FIRST GEAR AND THEN PULL THE CLUTCH IN TO SEE IF THE REAR WHEEL SPINS WHILE ON THE CENTER STAND. AND THEN SPIN THE REAR WHEEL AND SLOWLY LET OUT ON THE CLUTCH TO SEE IF THE REAR WHEEL GRABS WHEN THE CLUTCH LEVER IS RELEASED?
IS THERE A WAY TO DO A STATIC TEST SINCE THE BIKE IS IN A STATE OF BEING WORKED ON?

Thanks again!

Harkgold

rcno33
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2011 6:02 pm
Location: Germantown, MD, USA
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200A Aspencade

Re: Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby rcno33 » Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:02 pm

I just finished bleeding my clutch system today. I followed the instructions in the Haynes Workshop Manual, and I found the process very simple and direct (except that I found the bleed valve's location a bit hard to reach). Once I gathered all the tools and supplies, I think the job took all of 15 minutes.

I put about 25 miles' worth of city driving on the bike afterward, with no troubles. Shifting is smooth again.

79,900+ miles on my 84 Aspencade. I don't think it has ever been truly overhauled. Any suggestions on which system I should keep my eye on in the future? --Any system that is prone to failure at this age?

harkgold
Posts: 147
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:19 pm
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate

Re: Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby harkgold » Sun Jun 03, 2012 4:40 pm

seabee_ wrote:Here is a tutorial on bleeding the clutch with step by step pics and a video. See if this might be helpful. I agree with Wingadmin with the tip.

Oops, forgot to add the link. :o
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwingclutchbleeding.htm


Thanks Seabee for the link! I read the link and and with only one crack of the banjo bolt joint and five minutes I had a nice firm clutch lever.
I guess it's just simple science. Air bubbles will seek their highest point which in this case is the banjo bolt at the top end of the master cylinder.
Why didn't I figure that out? Trying to force air bubbles all the way from the master cylinder to the slave would be a heck of a job.
My question is......WHY THE HECK DON'T THE STUPID SERVICE MANUALS TELL US THESE THINGS???????????


Harkgold :roll:

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seabee_
Posts: 494
Joined: Sun May 29, 2011 8:17 pm
Location: sterling heights, mi
Motorcycle: 1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
117k miles
1977 Kawasaki kz400
1978 Suzuki GSXr750
1980 Kawasaki GPZ400
1975 Honda CB360T

Re: Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby seabee_ » Mon Jun 04, 2012 8:01 pm

harkgold wrote:
seabee_ wrote:Here is a tutorial on bleeding the clutch with step by step pics and a video. See if this might be helpful. I agree with Wingadmin with the tip.

Oops, forgot to add the link. :o
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwingclutchbleeding.htm


Thanks Seabee for the link! I read the link and and with only one crack of the banjo bolt joint and five minutes I had a nice firm clutch lever.
I guess it's just simple science. Air bubbles will seek their highest point which in this case is the banjo bolt at the top end of the master cylinder.
Why didn't I figure that out? Trying to force air bubbles all the way from the master cylinder to the slave would be a heck of a job.
My question is......WHY THE HECK DON'T THE STUPID SERVICE MANUALS TELL US THESE THINGS???????????


Harkgold :roll:

That's what we're here for on the forums. We pick up where the manuals leave off, or just forget to explain. :lol: Glad to hear you got things straightened out. Now you got to take her out for some long rides. :D
Paul
CE1 Navy Seabees/RET
1981 to 2002
ASE Mechanic

harkgold
Posts: 147
Joined: Thu Nov 03, 2011 9:19 pm
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate

Re: Clutch Slave Bleeding question

Postby harkgold » Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:18 pm

seabee_ wrote:
harkgold wrote:
seabee_ wrote:Here is a tutorial on bleeding the clutch with step by step pics and a video. See if this might be helpful. I agree with Wingadmin with the tip.

Oops, forgot to add the link. :o
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/goldwingclutchbleeding.htm


Thanks Seabee for the link! I read the link and and with only one crack of the banjo bolt joint and five minutes I had a nice firm clutch lever.
I guess it's just simple science. Air bubbles will seek their highest point which in this case is the banjo bolt at the top end of the master cylinder.
Why didn't I figure that out? Trying to force air bubbles all the way from the master cylinder to the slave would be a heck of a job.
My question is......WHY THE HECK DON'T THE STUPID SERVICE MANUALS TELL US THESE THINGS???????????


Harkgold :roll:

That's what we're here for on the forums. We pick up where the manuals leave off, or just forget to explain. :lol: Glad to hear you got things straightened out. Now you got to take her out for some long rides. :D


Thanks Seabee!
Baring any unforeseen last minute setbacks....my goal is to have the bike ready for its test run by this weekend.
I'm completely done with all the mechanical work and late last night just finished up a deep cleaning, rub out, and polish of all the tupperwear before putting it all back on the bike. Although cosmetically there will be a lot of touch up and fix-it work to be done I can do that later as time and money allows. The main thing for now is to get it mechanically sound for riding and as clean as I can possibly get it for a bike that sat uncovered in a barn for seven years.
I'm amazed at all the helpful tips many of you have provided. With advice from these forums I can't believe how the seat turned out. It looks brand new after being covered with a quarter inch of dirt and dust and bird poop.
Later I will send some before and after pictures.

Thanks again!

Harkgold




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