Main fairing & windscreen rattles


Information and questions on GL1200 Goldwings (1984-1987)
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aladdin
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:04 pm
Location: Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Motorcycle: 1987 Honda GL1200 Aspencade

Main fairing & windscreen rattles

Postby aladdin » Wed Aug 15, 2012 1:00 am



Should the main (upper) fairing and windscreen (along with mirrors) rattle and shake on rough asphalt? The mirrors become blurred and almost un-useable, and there is a lot of shaking and rattling when I go over rough seal. Is this normal for a 1200? Is there a simple fix? I should point out, the suspension seems to be ok, in fact it is handling fine and soaks up large bumps really well (my partner says its the most comfortable bike shes ever been on, even compared to a GL1800), so I am baffles as to why it shakes the fairing so much on pavement at moderate to low speeds.



aladdin
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:04 pm
Location: Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Motorcycle: 1987 Honda GL1200 Aspencade

Re: Main fairing & windscreen rattles

Postby aladdin » Wed Aug 15, 2012 2:37 am

A quick update - a previous owner had crashed this bike on the RHS and the entire right side of the fairing was loose and moving up and down around 5mm (1/4 inch). I don't know whats broken inside the fairing itself (mounting brackets etc) so as a quick fix put some quick dry glue in the joint between the lower portion of the fairing and the center (upper) portion, pulled the joint tightly together with a twisted up strop and put 5 rivets along the outer edge of the fairing just below the mirror, where they will be covered by the rubber edge strip (except the top two by the mirror which I spot painted black). Not the most elegant solution, but it works - mirror is not moving up and down freely now.

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feetup
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Location: West Coast of Canada
Motorcycle: 84 GL 1200I
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Re: Main fairing & windscreen rattles

Postby feetup » Wed Aug 15, 2012 12:29 pm

There is some difference of opinion across the various forums on the best way to fix the ABS plastic on these bikes. I'll try to summarize what I've learned so far.

Welding: Some hold that welding the plastic is the best way to go. It certainly is effective in my experience but sometimes difficult to get good results. Simply explained, the technique is to use a heat source like a low wattage soldering pencil or dual heat soldering gun and thin strips cut from ABS sheet, (Which is available at any plastic shop) or ABS rod, (sometime available).
Open out the crack into a shallow Vee configuration slightly narrower than the tip of the heat gun. A Dremel tool is great for this as is the corner of a triangular scraper. If the crack is open you can go ahead as it is. Then slowly work the gun in a wiggling fashion along the crack, getting right down into the bottom and causing both sides of the crack to melt, while at the same time, and with your free hand feeding the strip down onto the gun tip so that it also melts. As this happens push the gun back into the filler and crack, to pile the melted plastic back up into the crack then move slightly ahead and repeat. Wiggling side to side, and two steps forward, one back so to speak. A bit like digging a trench and refilling it behind you with a spade. It won't be terribly smooth till you get good at it, but endeavor to keep from trapping air in the "weld bead" and be sure to have both sides and the filler molten. It will cool and solidify quite quickly behind you. When it is all cool you can sand, and paint just like virgin plastic. Almost as strong as the parent material. The melting and solidifying of the plastic causes a small percentage of the molecular chains to break down so don't keep the plastic molten any longer than necessary.


Chemical Melting: Methylene Chloride is available at most plastic shops as are small applicator bottles with a hypodermic style tip. Lacquer Thinners, Methyl Ethyl Ketone and acetone also dissolve ABS but not as quickly.
All of these solvents are hazardous to health, and very flammable so use caution, lots of ventilation and keep it off your skin and out of your lungs and eyes. If you don't know how to do that, than don't use it!
Push, pull, tape and clamp the crack very tightly together then run a small bead of the solvent along the crack using an applicator or a small artists paint brush. The solvent evaporates very quickly so you will be best to run a bead of the solvent two, three, or even four times down the crack. When the crack edges melt, push the sides even tighter together and leave several hours to dry. this method works well for tight cracks but will not fill gaps. One can take a small glass jar with a tight lid and scrape, shave or file a quantity of ABS into it, then cover the shavings with a bit of Methylene Chloride or Lacquer thinners and stir or shake the mix every so often. In a few hours the ABS should be dissolved into a paste that can be used as a filler. It will shrink quite a bit as it dries, so several applications may be required at 12 to 24 hour intervals but the end result will be almost as strong ans the parent material.

Solvent Cement: Any plumbing supply or hardware outlet sells ABS solvent cement, and sometimes it is available in black. Usually however it is yellow or amber in color. This is simply a solvent, usually a mixture of Methyl Ethyl Ketone, and Acetone, with ABS resin dissolved in it. Usually no more than 20 to 40% resin. This can be worked into the crack and allowed to dry, then successive thin layers can be applied when the layer before is dry to build up the area. Do not apply to thick, several thin layers are better. This can also be sanded ad painted as well. The resins used are typically not as strong as the parent material and are designed for plumbing type joints where easy flow and shear strength are paramount, not butt joints where tensile strength is required.

Note that epoxy, urethane (Gorilla Glue), Model Cement (polystyrene), and Cyanoacrylate (Super glue) or any of the multi glues will not adhere to ABS, except by contact. There is a product by IPS of the USA called Weld-On #16 cement that will glue the ABS but the filler in this glue is an acrylic so much more brittle that ABS.

In the end a combination of all of the methods will be good tools to have in your arsenal and owning a 30 year old ABS bodied bike will give you plenty of opportunity to hone your skills.

aladdin
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2012 11:04 pm
Location: Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Motorcycle: 1987 Honda GL1200 Aspencade

Re: Main fairing & windscreen rattles

Postby aladdin » Wed Aug 15, 2012 5:01 pm

great advice, thanks




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