series voltage regulator/rectifier


Information and questions on GL1200 Goldwings (1984-1987)
  • Sponsored Links
flash1942
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 4:37 pm
Location: Midwest
Motorcycle: '84 Aspencade

series voltage regulator/rectifier

Postby flash1942 » Tue Sep 16, 2014 8:46 am



Has any one installed one of the series regulators on their 1200? If so, where did you get it and was it difficult to install it.



User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: series voltage regulator/rectifier

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Sep 16, 2014 10:16 am

flash1942 wrote:Has any one installed one of the series regulators on their 1200? If so, where did you get it and was it difficult to install it.


I have read about several people installing the Cycle Electric CE 605 SB on their 3-phase stator type bikes. However, it would be a bit problematic on a Goldwing. Series regulators generate a LOT of heat, and need to be in a cooling air stream in order to keep from overheating. So you would not be able to mount it in the existing regulator location, tucked up under the false tank. Perhaps mounted to the frame in front of the rear tire? It would take some creativity, plus some custom wiring harnesses to get it there.

flash1942
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 4:37 pm
Location: Midwest
Motorcycle: '84 Aspencade

Re: series voltage regulator/rectifier

Postby flash1942 » Wed Sep 17, 2014 5:34 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
flash1942 wrote:Has any one installed one of the series regulators on their 1200? If so, where did you get it and was it difficult to install it.


I have read about several people installing the Cycle Electric CE 605 SB on their 3-phase stator type bikes. However, it would be a bit problematic on a Goldwing. Series regulators generate a LOT of heat, and need to be in a cooling air stream in order to keep from overheating. So you would not be able to mount it in the existing regulator location, tucked up under the false tank. Perhaps mounted to the frame in front of the rear tire? It would take some creativity, plus some custom wiring harnesses to get it there.

I think this regulator is what the 3 phase stators need because they actually unload the stator as needed and control the output. I was not aware of the heat issue though. Wonder if a small processor chip fan would be enough installed in the stock location?
And thanks for your input.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: series voltage regulator/rectifier

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:42 pm

flash1942 wrote:I think this regulator is what the 3 phase stators need because they actually unload the stator as needed and control the output. I was not aware of the heat issue though. Wonder if a small processor chip fan would be enough installed in the stock location?
And thanks for your input.


Keep in mind the stator is capable of putting out 360 watts. That's a lot of energy. Computer CPUs sink about 65 watts on average, with massive server CPUs getting as high as 150. That's nowhere near 360 watts. I think you'd need more airflow than what a processor fan could provide.

flash1942
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 4:37 pm
Location: Midwest
Motorcycle: '84 Aspencade

Re: series voltage regulator/rectifier

Postby flash1942 » Thu Sep 18, 2014 6:16 pm

Then maybe I don't understand correctly.
The 360 watts isn't being generated all the time then where is all the heat coming from. The series reg is supposed to regulate by disconnecting the stator when there is no demand, correct? I thought the beauty of this reg is that it controlled the voltage and not by sinking it. I can't imagine using all 360 watts ever unless I wanted it to look like a Tijuana taxi. That is a lot of money to spend on a "heater" for an old 'wing.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: series voltage regulator/rectifier

Postby WingAdmin » Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:13 pm

flash1942 wrote:Then maybe I don't understand correctly.
The 360 watts isn't being generated all the time then where is all the heat coming from. The series reg is supposed to regulate by disconnecting the stator when there is no demand, correct? I thought the beauty of this reg is that it controlled the voltage and not by sinking it. I can't imagine using all 360 watts ever unless I wanted it to look like a Tijuana taxi. That is a lot of money to spend on a "heater" for an old 'wing.


It's certainly not dissipating 360 watts all the time. A series regulator uses a voltage reference (in this diagram, a zener diode) which causes a component (usually, but not always a MOSFET) to conduct. This allows current through to charge the battery and run the bike. When the bike's power requirements are low (i.e. battery fully charged), the MOSFET (or whatever) only allows a smaller amount of current through, to maintain the correct output voltage:



However, ALL of the power used by the bike flows through the MOSFET. MOSFETs are extremely efficient and put out almost no heat when fully on or off, but generate lots of heat when partially conducting. The more current being pulled through (i.e. higher load, charging battery right after starting the bike, etc.) the hotter the series regulator runs.

A shunt regulator works by taking excess power generated and shunting it across a component that is internally adjusted to control the amount of current flowing:



When there is not a large load, the stator still produces lots of voltage and in order to keep the voltage regulated to the correct level, some of the current is sent across the shunt. The remaining power is used to charge the battery and run the engine and accessories.


Series regulators are more efficient, and put far less load on your stator (unlike a shunt regulator, which presents full load to the stator at all times) so they can definitely help your stator last longer. However, they will put out a lot of heat, and if they do overheat the regulating component(s) in them can fail, leaving with you no power at all.

flash1942
Posts: 129
Joined: Fri Jan 24, 2014 4:37 pm
Location: Midwest
Motorcycle: '84 Aspencade

Re: series voltage regulator/rectifier

Postby flash1942 » Sat Sep 20, 2014 9:54 am

Thank you very much. I understand 200%. It's the best operational explanation I have ever seen and even more than the ones who sell it have told me. However now I'm torn on which way to go after considering the money involved AND the age of the bike. Either the series reg or an automotive alternator. Thanks again. You are an asset to the GW community !!!




Return to “GL1200 Information & Questions”




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest