Aux. fuse block


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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TennX
Posts: 139
Joined: Thu May 31, 2012 7:00 am
Location: Memphis, Tn.
Motorcycle: 97 GL 1500 Aspencade
06 VTX 1300R

Aux. fuse block

Postby TennX » Tue Jul 24, 2012 3:55 pm



I have a aux. fuse block on my VTX and Im thinking about installing one on my 1500, my question can I use the 5 amp accessory terminal to key on a relay to power the fuse block or do I need a higher amped source...of course it will have a variety of fuses in it..thanks


Phil.......

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WingAdmin
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Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Aux. fuse block

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jul 24, 2012 4:25 pm

That's exactly what I did, the acc terminal has more than enough power to actuate the relay. You can see my writeup of the install here: Electrical Connection Power Plate

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Phunnybone
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Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1985 GL1200 LTD (#2)
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Re: Aux. fuse block

Postby Phunnybone » Tue Jul 24, 2012 5:56 pm

I ordered the universal one for my 1200 LTD - but it's back ordered so I have to wait.

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TennX
Posts: 139
Joined: Thu May 31, 2012 7:00 am
Location: Memphis, Tn.
Motorcycle: 97 GL 1500 Aspencade
06 VTX 1300R

Re: Aux. fuse block

Postby TennX » Tue Jul 24, 2012 6:07 pm

WingAdmin wrote:That's exactly what I did, the acc terminal has more than enough power to actuate the relay. You can see my writeup of the install here: Electrical Connection Power Plate


I called myself doing a search but I missed this, many, many thanks.....

You know it may sound strange, but Im glad I bought a 15 year old bike rather than a newer 1800 ...just something about keeping these old bikes on the road....with the VTX and the 1500 I have the best of both worlds....
Phil.......

wingone01
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Joined: Fri May 30, 2014 8:53 pm
Location: West Central Indiana
Motorcycle: 1995 Goldwing SE GL1500

Aux. fuse block

Postby wingone01 » Wed Aug 27, 2014 8:37 pm

I just completed my aux fuse block. It has 3 controlled relays and an 8-fuse block for multiple outputs. Went on a couple of short trips since the unit was installed and everything seems to be working great. I have a number of things I want to add to the bike, but my next big project is tackling an upgraded alternator.
Attachments
This project actually started out as a simple auxiliary power outlet for a volt meter and a Zumo GPS but the design kept getting bigger by the minute. By the time it was installed, there were 3-switched relays and an 8-fuse outlet block. To make the board removable, Molex connectors were attached to the relay wires. The opposite ends were attached to the acc. outlet for control, a ground bar that was added and a +12 vdc source (hot all the time). All this was mounted on a nylon high temperature rated panel. Each relay output was jumpered to two fuse blocks. The blue wire from each relay was the Normally Closed (NC) contact. Heat shrink was added to the connectors but was not actually needed as the connectors are insulated. One white wire from the relay will be used for a battery tender. This is on the Normally Open (NO) contact.
This project actually started out as a simple auxiliary power outlet for a volt meter and a Zumo GPS but the design kept getting bigger by the minute. By the time it was installed, there were 3-switched relays and an 8-fuse outlet block. To make the board removable, Molex connectors were attached to the relay wires. The opposite ends were attached to the acc. outlet for control, a ground bar that was added and a +12 vdc source (hot all the time). All this was mounted on a nylon high temperature rated panel. Each relay output was jumpered to two fuse blocks. The blue wire from each relay was the Normally Closed (NC) contact. Heat shrink was added to the connectors but was not actually needed as the connectors are insulated. One white wire from the relay will be used for a battery tender. This is on the Normally Open (NO) contact.
Here the wiring is nearing completion. The Molex connector has been installed. A 15 pin connector was used but in the end, only about 6 pins were actually needed. You can see the white wire mentioned earlier running to fuse #7, this will be for a battery tender. The red wire is hot all the time. Not sure what it will be used for, but felt at least one was needed so it was placed on fuse #8. The other two white wires are not used at this time. The “pigtail” is actually too long and could have been half the length. The excess wire was hidden behind the plastic cover.
Here the wiring is nearing completion. The Molex connector has been installed. A 15 pin connector was used but in the end, only about 6 pins were actually needed. You can see the white wire mentioned earlier running to fuse #7, this will be for a battery tender. The red wire is hot all the time. Not sure what it will be used for, but felt at least one was needed so it was placed on fuse #8. The other two white wires are not used at this time. The “pigtail” is actually too long and could have been half the length. The excess wire was hidden behind the plastic cover.
The aux. power outlet installed. As with the commercial version available, this was mounted close to the power supply to keep wiring lengths to a minimum. 90 degree connectors worked better on the right side of the new fuse block as space is limited due to the main fuse. The cover over this area was constantly checked for clearance.
The aux. power outlet installed. As with the commercial version available, this was mounted close to the power supply to keep wiring lengths to a minimum. 90 degree connectors worked better on the right side of the new fuse block as space is limited due to the main fuse. The cover over this area was constantly checked for clearance.
Space is a premium on these bikes. A voltmeter was added to the gas cap cover. Wires were ran below and connected to a 2-pin Molex connectors. The voltmeter can be disconnected when the radio panel is removed. Fuse #1 on the aux. power outlet was used to supply power to the meter which is only on when the bike is running. The meter is “supposed” to be waterproof, but only time will tell.
Space is a premium on these bikes. A voltmeter was added to the gas cap cover. Wires were ran below and connected to a 2-pin Molex connectors. The voltmeter can be disconnected when the radio panel is removed. Fuse #1 on the aux. power outlet was used to supply power to the meter which is only on when the bike is running. The meter is “supposed” to be waterproof, but only time will tell.
A ground bus was installed under the seat. The bar is aluminum bent to follow the contour of the frame; drilled and tapped to accept 8-32 screws. The screws were cut off so they did not be below the bus bar as there is a major wire bundle running below this. The bar was bolted (yellow) to two existing holes in the cross over bar. Star washers were used so the bolts would “dig” into the steel. Dielectric grease was used at this joint. Not sure how the aluminum and steel would react with each other. The bolts and screws are brass.
A ground bus was installed under the seat. The bar is aluminum bent to follow the contour of the frame; drilled and tapped to accept 8-32 screws. The screws were cut off so they did not be below the bus bar as there is a major wire bundle running below this. The bar was bolted (yellow) to two existing holes in the cross over bar. Star washers were used so the bolts would “dig” into the steel. Dielectric grease was used at this joint. Not sure how the aluminum and steel would react with each other. The bolts and screws are brass.
Several options were considered for mounting various accessories. I was going to go with a Texelent bar but wanted to keep the center area between the handle bars open. An alternate was using a Ram screw mounted ball. A hole was drilled in the ignition cover and the ball mounted.
Several options were considered for mounting various accessories. I was going to go with a Texelent bar but wanted to keep the center area between the handle bars open. An alternate was using a Ram screw mounted ball. A hole was drilled in the ignition cover and the ball mounted.
The Zumo already came with a Ram mount so it worked out perfectly. Wire is ran on the right side of the GPS, under the ignition cover and coiled under the left pocket. A small hole was drilled in the side of the left pocket to route the various connectors from the GPS. When not in use, they are left coiled up in the pocket. With this arrangement, all of the instruments are still visible and the GPS remains just below line of sight. A Glare Stomper was added later. The GPS can be adjusted as needed to maintain gauge visibility.
The Zumo already came with a Ram mount so it worked out perfectly. Wire is ran on the right side of the GPS, under the ignition cover and coiled under the left pocket. A small hole was drilled in the side of the left pocket to route the various connectors from the GPS. When not in use, they are left coiled up in the pocket. With this arrangement, all of the instruments are still visible and the GPS remains just below line of sight. A Glare Stomper was added later. The GPS can be adjusted as needed to maintain gauge visibility.




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