1995 timing belt


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Jack Creeden
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue May 08, 2012 7:22 am
Location: Washington, District of Columbia
Motorcycle: 1995 GL1500 Aspencade

1995 timing belt

Postby Jack Creeden » Sat Dec 22, 2012 4:56 pm



I have a 1995 1500 with 13,300 miles. Should I replace the timing belt due too the age?



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RBGERSON
Posts: 2621
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 7:57 am
Location: SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Motorcycle: 98 SE GL 1500
had every year from 75 to 83

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby RBGERSON » Sat Dec 22, 2012 5:38 pm

I would.............................
HAD LOTS OF GOLDWING 75-83
NOW INTO 1500'S..RIDING A 1998 SE

FAIR WINDS,
RB

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redial
Posts: 1993
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:17 am
Location: Kapunda, SouthAustralia
Motorcycle: 1997 GL1500 Spectre Red Aspencade

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby redial » Sat Dec 22, 2012 6:31 pm

+1 for replacing. At that age, they may be in decline. For the sake of a few dollars, and some time, (it[color=#408000] is winter so time should not be a problem), change the belts. There is a good "how to" on this site, so it should not be a problem.[/color]
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

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wideload1
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Location: golden, Colorado
Motorcycle: 1995 GL1500 SE
1977 XS650

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby wideload1 » Sat Dec 22, 2012 8:17 pm

I just replaced the timing belts on my '95 GL1500 - 53K miles on the clock. The belts didn't show any wear, but I did not want to take a chance, and the replacement process is not that difficult. I work carefully and deliberately - the entire job took a short leisurly day including spark plugs, but no radiator fluid change.

I got the Gates timing belts from Amazon. They were about $15 or $16 each with free shippping. That is a a good deal. I followed the DIY instructions on this site and as expected, the photos and desriptions are great. I learned a few things along the way: 1). I did not need to chage the coolant, so I did not romove the hoses. There is plenty of room to do the belt replacement without removing the hoses - not a single problem related to having enough clerance. 2). After you loosen the tensioners, press them into the fully loose position and lock them down. Installing the new belts with the tensioners locked in that position is easy peasy. 3). For both pulse generators, you can loosen one bolt and remove the other to allow it to pivot out of the way when you are removing/installing the back timing belt. Without removing the component you can save the time and frustration fooling with the wire stay and wire attached to it. 4). When you re-attach the the wire to the oil pressure sending unit, you can turn the rubber boot inside out to ease the reattachment of the wire. Honda used good rubber in that boot, mine was nice and solid even after living seventeen years in that harsh environment.

I did run in to one concern. Prior to replacing the original belts, I didn't watch the belts/tensioners/pulleys while the engine was running. After making the replacement, I see that there is a little bit (I don't know how to measure this) of runout of the crankshaft pulley when the engine is running. While the belts were removed, I checked the cam shaft and crank pulleys, finding no evidence of looseness or keyway wear. Given that the original belts showed no damage or wear, do you think this will be a problem?

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robb
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Location: Lexington, North Carolina
Motorcycle: 1989 Honda GL1500 Aspencade

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby robb » Sun Dec 23, 2012 12:49 pm

Took earlier this year and changed bolts on my 89 at 73,000 miles. All markings were readable and not one crack to be found, there was no contamination inside cover from dirt or oil. Belts were tested at a machine shop for stretch, only .019 longer than new gates belts. Gates new belts should be good for 100k without issue. I think a lot has to do with riding habits, heavy loads or trailer towing will dictate more frequent service. If in doubt change it, it's a small price to pay for peace of mind.

Have two rider in group with more than 250k on original belts and no sign of problems and both tow a trailer and are almost always two up riding.

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redial
Posts: 1993
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:17 am
Location: Kapunda, SouthAustralia
Motorcycle: 1997 GL1500 Spectre Red Aspencade

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby redial » Sun Dec 23, 2012 6:18 pm

Have two rider in group with more than 250k on original belts and no sign of problems and both tow a trailer and are almost always two up riding.


After 250 000 miles or kilometres I would be changing them. How do they know that there are "no sign(s) of problems"? Unless they do a very careful inspection of the belts, how would they know that there are no splits, tears, or delaminations?

There is nothing more final than the sound of a timing belt breaking, and the valves and pistons having a conference :evil: There is no saving in letting the belts go this long - what $50 for belts and a bit of time versus an engine rebuild or replacement. You do the maths.
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

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robb
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Location: Lexington, North Carolina
Motorcycle: 1989 Honda GL1500 Aspencade

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby robb » Sun Dec 23, 2012 10:21 pm

One had a bad pickup and I did see the belts and they did look good. AT 10 turns of engine the marks were spot on so belts were not replaced.

My 23 year old belts had no sign of wear what so ever. It's easy to remove the right side engine cover for inspection. Only reason I did change was to add a 4 degree trigger wheel, which was abandoned after finding a vacumn tube leak. Since I had then they were replaced.

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WingAdmin
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Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby WingAdmin » Sun Dec 30, 2012 10:21 pm

robb wrote:One had a bad pickup and I did see the belts and they did look good. AT 10 turns of engine the marks were spot on so belts were not replaced.

My 23 year old belts had no sign of wear what so ever. It's easy to remove the right side engine cover for inspection. Only reason I did change was to add a 4 degree trigger wheel, which was abandoned after finding a vacumn tube leak. Since I had then they were replaced.


Timing belts are not like the regular serpentine drive belts you see in your car. Automobile serpentine belts can stretch over time, and they have spring-loaded idler wheels that take up the slack as the belts age. If a timing belt were to stretch, it would throw the timing of the valves off, and the result would be catastrophic. Therefore, timing belts are designed not to stretch, not even the tiniest bit, EVER.

Therein lies the problem. Serpentine drive belts start to crack as they stretch and age. Timing belts, with their special fibers inside, don't stretch, so they don't crack - so a timing belt that is 20 years old with 80,000 miles on it can look virtually identical to one that was put on six months ago and has 500 miles on it. Honda's service schedule says to "inspect" the timing belt - but there is no practicable way of doing this, other than looking for broken teeth on the belt itself. A timing belt wears on the inside, where you can't see it. A timing belt that is about to break can look exactly like one that will run for another 50,000 miles.

So what to do? Simple - if you don't know how long the belt has been on your bike, or how many miles are on it, it's time to change it - now, before you start the engine again. Spending $80 and an afternoon replacing your timing belts is cheap insurance, and a great alternative to spending weeks and thousands of dollars on a new engine.

How long is a belt good for? It varies. Honda's official word is to "inspect" the belt every 24,000 miles, and replace it every 100,000 miles. It doesn't speak to belt age. A more realistic belt life schedule is 50,000 miles or every 10 years, whichever comes first. Belts that have been in an engine that has not been run for years will have taken a permanent "bend" and should be replaced before the engine is run.

rsmith2370
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Joined: Tue May 24, 2011 10:20 pm
Location: irvine, CA
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby rsmith2370 » Tue Jan 01, 2013 5:08 pm

I had the same issue with my 1996 GL1500 with less than 10K miles on it. Everyone I talked to recommended changing the belts (baed on age alone) as a preventative measure and keeping the old belts in case I needed one in a emergency. The old belts looked to be in excellent condition, but who knows that is going on inside them. Changing the belts is cheap insurance.

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WingAdmin
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Posts: 17046
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Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jan 01, 2013 6:41 pm

rsmith2370 wrote:I had the same issue with my 1996 GL1500 with less than 10K miles on it. Everyone I talked to recommended changing the belts (baed on age alone) as a preventative measure and keeping the old belts in case I needed one in a emergency. The old belts looked to be in excellent condition, but who knows that is going on inside them. Changing the belts is cheap insurance.


Keeping a belt for an "emergency" isn't really worthwhile. If you break a belt while the engine is running, you're going to need more than just a new belt to get you back on the road again.

Larrs2
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GL 1500
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Re: 1995 timing belt

Postby Larrs2 » Wed Jan 02, 2013 3:01 am

WingAdmin is spot on. I have been a mac. till I retired and I would never run a timing belt on a car over 60,000 miles and on a car I know they like to brake around 90,000. Also they look GOOD till the second they brake. I was ridding with my son when his broke at 70,000 in his car. I have bought a 82 Goldwing that on a test drive, the owner had it up to 70 mph. When I got it home I had a bad feeling about the bike and took the timing covers off . I found the right side had 1 1/4 in play in the belt. BOY was I glad I took the cover off before ridding it. Again a belt will look GOOD till the second it brakes or just strips teeth off. Larrs




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