1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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stacylaycock
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1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby stacylaycock » Mon Mar 11, 2013 10:34 am



I HAVE A 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE AND WAS WONDERING IF ANYONE WOULD KNOW WHERE I CAN FIND WHERE THE GROUND WIRES WOULD BE LOCATED THAT ARE BOLTED TO THE FRAME. HAVE FUNNY ELECTRICAL ISSUES GOING ON AND HAVE BEEN TOLD TO CHECK THE GROUND WIRE LUGS THAT ARE BOLTED TO THE FRAME THAT THEY COULD BE LOOSE OR TRY TO CLEAN THEM. ANYONE THAT COULD POINT ME IN THE RIGHT AREA OF MY BIKE. I CAN'T SEE THEM OR FIND THEM ON THIS BIKE. THANK YOU STACY



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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby bustedwing » Wed Mar 13, 2013 7:29 pm

If you follow the ground wire or negative wire from your battery it will join at a ground post on the frame. Also there is one near the fuse block. All of the connections should be cleaned then use di-electronic grease to coat the connections before assembly. The grease conducts electricity but fights corrosion. Hopefully this helps.
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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Mar 13, 2013 10:45 pm

bustedwing wrote:If you follow the ground wire or negative wire from your battery it will join at a ground post on the frame. Also there is one near the fuse block. All of the connections should be cleaned then use di-electronic grease to coat the connections before assembly. The grease conducts electricity but fights corrosion. Hopefully this helps.


That's a common misconception. Dielectric grease is an INSULATOR, and does not conduct electricity at all. It is used to prevent oxidation of terminals and connectors, but those connectors must have physical contact - the dielectric grease will not provide conductivity if the connectors are not mated.

It can actually CAUSE problems if the connectors are weak and not tightly pressed together - the grease can cause the connection to break or be intermittent.

I see a good use for dielectric grease for connectors that are subject to moisture, but for the majority of connectors and connections in a motorcycle, I don't use it.

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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby bustedwing » Thu Mar 14, 2013 8:58 am

Sorry Wing but I am going to have to disagree with you on this one. I have been a diesel mechanic for the better part of 40 years and the use of dielectric grease has saved many connections that are exposed to the weather. Granted it can't be used on circuits that are used in computer or engine monitoring systems due to change in resistance. And yes the connections need to be mated, but that is the idea in any wiring system. But to use it on trailer connections, bulb connections, it will work great.
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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby RBGERSON » Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:04 am

There 5 or 6 ground nut points on the 1500's a couple up near the oil dipstick and up next the the thermostat housing according the wiring diagram in the manual.
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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby redial » Sun Mar 17, 2013 5:42 am

Have you missed me? I had a viral infection that knocked the stuffing out of me, but things are on the mend.

However, back to Dielectric Grease. I took the time to look up my favourite source for information, Wikipedia, and found this as a reasonable explanation of how things worked:


As a sealant around electrical contacts
Dielectric grease

Dielectric grease is electrically insulating and does not break down when high voltage is applied. It is often applied to electrical connectors, particularly those containing rubber gaskets, as a means of lubricating and sealing rubber portions of the connector without arcing.

A common use of dielectric grease is in high-voltage connections associated with gasoline engine spark plugs. The grease is applied to the rubber boot of the plug wire. This helps the rubber boot slide onto the ceramic insulator of the plug. The grease also acts to seal the rubber boot, while at the same time preventing the rubber from becoming stuck to the ceramic. Generally spark plugs are located in areas of high temperature, and the grease is formulated to withstand the temperature range expected. It can be applied to the actual contact as well, because the contact pressure is sufficient to penetrate the grease. Doing so on such high pressure contact surfaces has the advantage of sealing the contact area against corrosion.

Another common use of dielectric grease is on the rubber mating surfaces or gaskets of multi-pin electrical connectors used in automotive and marine engines. The grease again acts as a lubricant and a sealant on the nonconductive mating surfaces of the connector. It is not recommended to be applied to the actual electrical conductive contacts of the connector because it could interfere with the electrical signals passing through the connector in cases where the contact pressure is very low. Products designed as electronic connector lubricants, on the other hand, should be applied to such connector contacts and can dramatically extend their useful life. Polyphenyl Ether, rather than silicone grease, is the active ingredient in some such connector lubricants.

Silicone grease should not be applied to (or next to) any switch contact that might experience arcing, as silicone can convert to silicon-carbide under arcing conditions, and accumulation of the silicon-carbide can cause the contacts to prematurely fail.


I hope this helps in understanding of the use and abuse of grease. I always secure the connection, and afterwards grease it up so that the grease is on the 'outside', rather than between the mating surfaces.
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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby bustedwing » Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:22 pm

Thank you Redial for spelling that out step by step. And I can see where the confusion between myself and Wing came from, basically in how we described it's usage, and we both we right in in our ways, just I failed to describe the steps of how I used it.Sorry Wing, I owe you a cold whatever.
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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby vtxcandyred » Mon Mar 18, 2013 6:00 am

I use a copper graphite grease on my larger electrical connections.

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Re: 1994 GOLDWING GL1500SE LOCATION OF GROUND LUGS

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Mar 19, 2013 9:46 pm

bustedwing wrote:Thank you Redial for spelling that out step by step. And I can see where the confusion between myself and Wing came from, basically in how we described it's usage, and we both we right in in our ways, just I failed to describe the steps of how I used it.Sorry Wing, I owe you a cold whatever.


Yup. I should have mentioned as well what redial mentioned, that the best way to use it is to mate the connection and THEN apply the grease. That said, for low-voltage (i.e. audio, digital) connections, I wouldn't use it. For higher current connections where there could be heat involved if contacts oxidized, it's much more indicated - especially for connectors hanging down in the road spray, like trailer connectors.




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