coupled brakes


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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idflyit
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Oct 28, 2014 7:24 pm
Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Motorcycle: 1999 Goldwing gl1500se

coupled brakes

Postby idflyit » Tue Dec 08, 2015 11:20 am



1999 GL1500 se I dont care for the coupled brakes on the pedal.Any thoughts on UN- COUPLED system...thx to all in advance. HAPPY HOLIDAYS



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hugger-4641
Posts: 180
Joined: Wed May 25, 2011 1:07 pm
Location: McKenzie, TN
Motorcycle: 1994 GL1500 Aspencade, 1982 CM 200 Twinstar, 1984 VT500 Ascot

Re: coupled brakes

Postby hugger-4641 » Wed Dec 09, 2015 2:24 am

You know, I've ridden moto-x bikes since I was 12,and street bikes/crotch rockets since I was 15. I thought that I would not like the coupled brake system that my Aspencade has. I've since changed my mind. During a hard stop on wet pavement, 980lbs of Wing is a lot more to manipulate than a 500lb CBRR. There's been a couple times when I probably would not have stopped the Wing quick enough without the coupled brake system.

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WingAdmin
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Posts: 17050
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: coupled brakes

Postby WingAdmin » Wed Dec 09, 2015 9:43 am

hugger-4641 wrote:You know, I've ridden moto-x bikes since I was 12,and street bikes/crotch rockets since I was 15. I thought that I would not like the coupled brake system that my Aspencade has. I've since changed my mind. During a hard stop on wet pavement, 980lbs of Wing is a lot more to manipulate than a 500lb CBRR. There's been a couple times when I probably would not have stopped the Wing quick enough without the coupled brake system.


Same here. I fully expected to hate the linked braking system on my GL1500, and also expected that I would at some point look at de-linking it. But I actually do like it, it makes it easier to balance front/rear braking, and in a panic stop it definitely helps keep from locking up your rear wheel.

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Happytrails
Posts: 653
Joined: Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:13 pm
Location: Tarentum, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: 1991 Goldwing 1500 SE

Re: coupled brakes

Postby Happytrails » Wed Dec 09, 2015 11:57 pm

Me too. Didnt think I would trust the linked brake system. During heavy rear braking situations the bike will squat more than it dives. It makes for a more controlled braking. Im very sold on it now. It feels the same on an FJR. You just have to give it a chance.
1991 GL1500 SE Anniversary Edition
Sun Flare Gold Metallic
Vallant Brown Inset

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newtothe1996wing
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon May 12, 2014 8:32 pm
Location: Pace, FL
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500 1996 2055 miles on as of 5/2014!

Re: coupled brakes

Postby newtothe1996wing » Sat Jan 09, 2016 2:56 pm

I have a 96 CBR1000F, it has linked braking also, but much more complicated than the wing. If you are truly interested in separating them, chem out the Honda CBR forum, may get some ideas there. Once on site go to the 1000F or Hurricane forum.

millerized
Posts: 170
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:33 am
Location: Inwood, WV
Motorcycle: 99 GL1500SE
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Re: coupled brakes

Postby millerized » Mon Jan 11, 2016 7:06 pm

Unless Honda did something really off the wall, should be a matter of just changing out the hoses so they just feed what they'd normally feed.
I know going from unlinked to linked requires proportioning valves usually to prevent one from over powering the other...., but unlinking them theoretically only required changing out the hoses. Unless, of course, you want to pull it ALL off the bike that is.

Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but one of the front brakes is 'fed' from the front brake lever, and the other side is linked to the rear pedal.

Changing to a front only front brake lever would either require a 2 hose system from the master cylinder to the individual sides or a common manifold that splits to the individual brakes. Only question is whether or not the front brake puts out enough fluid to lock both sides up? A simple change to a larger capacity from master should take care of it if it's not. Find a 6 pot bike, 'borrow' the front brake master cylinder from it for the wing. The rear at that point is just a matter of disconnecting the front hose and reattaching just the rear to the pedal.

And I'm afraid to say that while I didn't like the idea once I found out about it, I'm slowly being sold on it. I'm usually a 90% front brake guy on my concours going into corners, little to none while in the turn and with just a touch of rear to temper the acceleration going through (since I'm never really off the throttle). I tried the hard on the front with the wing, finding it severely lacking in comparison to the connie's stock braking. Hammering the 'rear' or 'linked' brake really does seem to slow this beast down a lot faster. I'm not completely off the hard front brake usage, but I'm slowly learning that the rear brake does a lot more than it normally does on most other bikes.

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 728
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD, 2008 GL1800

Re: coupled brakes

Postby Rednaxs60 » Mon Jan 11, 2016 8:00 pm

I find the linked brakes on my '08 1800 and '85 1200 LTD to be quite good. On the 1800, I use more pressure on the rear brake when coming to a stop then the front brake. Makes for a more controlled stop. The '85 1200 LTD has linked brakes as well with the rear and right front being connected and the left front as a solo item. I notice that the 1500 has 2 piston calipers.

The difference between the 1800 and 1200 is the 2 piston versus 3 piston caliper. When applying the rear brake on the 1800, the rear and left front calipers are engaged. When you use the front brake lever, the right front caliper and the middle piston on the left caliper are engaged.

Linked brakes are also good for emergency stopping, and accident avoidance. The courses I have been on have the braking sequence as rear brake, front brake (squeeze), and more pressure coming to a controlled stop, or reduced speed then move where you want to go. This sequence is so the bike does not unload the rear tire before applying the brake. It happens quickly, but does work. Having linked brakes enhances this process.

Here is a link to a site where the author did away with the linked brakes - http://www.salzmoto.com/wrench-log/wren ... ls-brakes/

Here is link to a thread on this forum. viewtopic.php?t=11786

Just some thoughts. Good luck - Cheers

Ernest


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest


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