Clutch Sticking


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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mikelens
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Clutch Sticking

Postby mikelens » Wed Jul 13, 2016 4:57 pm



On my '95 SE, when shifting into first gear for the first time in the AM; bike lurches forward against the brakes. I did an oil & filter change with Deleo 400. No change. What can be causing the plates to stick?



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ct1500
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Re: Clutch Sticking

Postby ct1500 » Wed Jul 13, 2016 6:19 pm

Somewhat typical, with that said if you have a worn clutch lever bushing or worn pushrod/pushrod bushing in the lever you are not getting full clutch disengagement and makes it worse.
This is what I do
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Bluewaterhooker0
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Re: Clutch Sticking

Postby Bluewaterhooker0 » Wed Jul 13, 2016 7:13 pm

My '97 does the same thing, as did the other 3 bikes I owned years ago. It would appear typical of motorcycles, as the other 3 were a Honda, Kawasaki, and a Suzuki. The lower the RPM's when you first shift, the less noticeable is the issue. I generally let the bike warm up enough to lower the RPM's from the initial enriched state, and get the normal idle speed. That is the minimum "clunk" achievable. I have read of others starting the bike in gear, via the clutch pull method, to avoid the problem, but never worried enough about it to try that. I have also heard of, and tried rolling the bike forward or back, and pulling the clutch handle multiple times, then holding the clutch in for a period of time, before shifting to 1st. It has some positive effect, but not enough to bother doing it all the time. Just minimize your RPM's before shifting, and I think that will be the best outcome.

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Happytrails
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Re: Clutch Sticking

Postby Happytrails » Wed Jul 13, 2016 9:42 pm

Every bike I've ever ridden lurched somewhat when putting it into gear even brand new models like 2015-16's. But I guess maybe yours is lurching pretty hard against the brakes? Could be the slave cylinder needs serviced and isn't working right. Even if the fluid has been changed regularly I'm told they can gum up and need a good cleaning out. :D

This is how mine looked when I first bought my bike. The walls of the slave cylinder were so badly scored I just replaced the entire thing. It was making clutch engagement a real adventure because I could never tell when and if it would engage/release. It kept changing. You can see how the clutch fluid was leaking out. And the piston was sort of off angle in the cylinder.


You can see where the clutch fluid was weeping out of the hole at the bottom and running down my clutch cover. I dont think PO's kept up with the clutch and brake fluids very well.

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Dusty Boots
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Re: Clutch Sticking

Postby Dusty Boots » Thu Jul 14, 2016 1:33 am

When you 1st start it up and are ready to shift into 1st, pull in the clutch lever and wait 10 seconds before shifting into 1st. That will really decrease the tendency to 'lurch'

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Re: Clutch Sticking

Postby Wingsconsin » Thu Jul 14, 2016 2:20 pm

I always thought it was because of the wet clutch
The hydraulic action of the oil on the clutch plates keeps them stuck together for a split second (like when you life a sweaty glass and the coaster sticks to the bottom) -
One way is to pull in the clutch lever- blip the engine to increase revs - then engage the shift into gear once the revs come back down - the same thing Dusty is promoting -- patience .
Just my 2¢
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Re: Clutch Sticking

Postby WingAdmin » Mon Jul 18, 2016 11:05 pm

Wingsconsin wrote:I always thought it was because of the wet clutch
The hydraulic action of the oil on the clutch plates keeps them stuck together for a split second (like when you life a sweaty glass and the coaster sticks to the bottom) -
One way is to pull in the clutch lever- blip the engine to increase revs - then engage the shift into gear once the revs come back down - the same thing Dusty is promoting -- patience .
Just my 2¢


This is correct. It's a combination of momentum and hydraulic friction. With the clutch out, the input cluster is rotating with the engine. You pull the clutch in, and the input cluster starts to spin down. If you kick it into first, the dogs on the rotating input cluster mesh into the dogs on the stationary output cluster - which itself is connected to the rear wheel. The momentum energy of the rotating input cluster is transferred to the wheel, lurching the bike forward.

If you pull the clutch in and wait a few seconds for the input cluster to come to a stop, you can usually kick it into first with no lurch at all. However, sometimes it comes to a stop in a position where the dogs do not mesh with the dogs on the output cluster - in which case you won't get it into gear at all, without first letting go of the clutch momentarily to spin the input cluster again.

When it is cold, oil is thicker, and you can get hydraulic coupling between the clutch plates, which can transfer rotational energy from the engine to the idling input cluster, even when the clutch is pulled in. In this case, you're going to get a lurch forward when you kick into first, even if you wait.

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mikelens
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Re: Clutch Sticking

Postby mikelens » Fri Jul 22, 2016 7:59 pm

Thanks guys. Holding the clutch in for a few before shifting into gear has made a ton of difference.




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