On Board Compressor Question


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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reasonator
Posts: 41
Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 3:25 pm
Location: Corydon, IN
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500

On Board Compressor Question

Postby reasonator » Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:21 pm



So I finally figured out all the trick to getting it to work! The key must be in the ACC position AND the handlebars turned all the way to the left!? That last part makes no sense, but that's what it takes to get air out of the aux. hose.

SO MY QUESTION: It appears that the compressor is sending air to the rear shock first, then that air is released to flow thought aux. hose. Is there a concern with OVER INFLATING the rear shock?!

Thanks for any insight here, your help is much appreciated!


"Those that dare to be can never be weak." - Unknown

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MikeB
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Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade.
2003 - GL1800A

Re: On Board Compressor Question

Postby MikeB » Mon Jun 20, 2011 11:56 pm

Before I say much on the subject, I think the Owners Manual needs to be adressed. Here is the wording from the 1989 Owners Manual on the subject:
REAR SUSPENSION
The rear suspension of this motorcycle can provide the desired ride and level under various rider/cargo weights and riding conditions through adjustments of the air pressure. The usable air pressure range under normal conditions is: 0-400 kPa (0-4.0 kg/cm2, 0-57 psi)
Low air pressure settings provide a softer ride and are for light loads and smooth road conditions. High air pressure settings provide a firmer ride and are for heavy loads and rough road conditions.

To adjust and check the rear suspension air pressure:
1. Turn the ignition switch to ON, P or ACC.
2. The air pressure will appear in the display whenever the
P. CHECK button is pushed.
3. Push the INCREASE or DECREASE button to adjust the air pressure while pushing the P. CHECK button.

To supply air pressure from the outlet valve:
1. Turn the ignition switch to the P position.
2. To inflate a tyre, connect an air supply hose to the outlet valve.
3. Push the OUTLET button to supply air pressure. The air pressure will not appear in the display at this time.
CAUTION: • Do not operate the air pump for more than 5 minutes at a time or the pump unit may be damaged.


The air to the rear suspension is only routed to the air bladder when it is operated in the above manner.
Take special notice of the Caution. You have obviously not done it yet but you will find that filling your tire from about 5 psi to 38 psi will take about 30 minutes. I strongly suggest that you buy a small portable air compressor to use instead of the onboard compressor if your intent is to fill tires. That onboard compressor is vital to your suspension adjustment. If you damage that compressor, you are looking at a steep bill to replace it. The small portables MIGHT cost as much as $20 and some as low as $10 and they do the job a lot quicker than the onboard compressor.

One more thing, if you intend to use the onboard compressor to fill things other than your rear suspension, I am sure you have or will notice that you can only do it with the engine off and the compressor running off of the battery ONLY. When out in the stix with a flat tire and doing a tire plug and air-up, you stand the risk of killing your battery while fixing your original rideability situation. A portable can be run with the engine running and the alternator powering the motorcycle, keeping the battery charged and the compressor operating and filling your tire. In October of 2002, Motorcycle Consumer News printed an article on how to convert a $10 compressor so that you can put it in a small camera case and carry it on the bike. I converted two of them and carry one on my Wing and one on my ST1100. If you like, I can send you that article. It is a one page PDF file. I'd put it up here but the site does not accept PDF files for posting.
Here are a couple of pictures of the article that should get you started down the right road:



I hope this was informative and helpful.
MikeB
Tacoma, WA, USA

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reasonator
Posts: 41
Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 3:25 pm
Location: Corydon, IN
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500

Re: On Board Compressor Question

Postby reasonator » Tue Jun 21, 2011 12:35 am

Thanks for all the info, it's very helpful. And yes I would LOVE to have the article on converting a portable compressor! You can send it to the following address (that will get deleted after I receive the file):

MikeB@ChristopherReason.com
"Those that dare to be can never be weak." - Unknown

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WingAdmin
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Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: On Board Compressor Question

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jun 21, 2011 9:50 am

You can link it directly from the Motorcycle Consumer News web site: http://www.mcnews.com/mcn/features/Mini ... ressor.pdf

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 17046
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: On Board Compressor Question

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Jun 21, 2011 9:51 am

Incidentally, I rewired the compressor in my 1100 so that it can run when the engine is running - that way I don't tax my battery running the compressor.




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