Markland heel/toe shifter


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Okayamapiper
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Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby Okayamapiper » Wed Jan 11, 2012 6:51 am



I have a Markland low boy heel/toe shifter on my bike as I tore my calf muscle over the holidays and have difficulty shifting up. The best thing would be to park the bike until healed but as I commute by bike I have to ride. As I am new to this type of shifter and nobody around me has used one, I was wondering if it is okay to keep my foot on the shifter at all time or only put my foot on it when shifting. The brake side has a heel rest but there is nothing like that on the left side. Any input would be helpful.



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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby dingdong » Wed Jan 11, 2012 9:51 am

Your best bet would be to convert the heel/toe back to original foot pegs. I would never ride with my toe on the shifter. Constant pressure will surely cause premature wear and inadvertent shifting. Hit a bump and cause a down shift. Not good.
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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby Okayamapiper » Wed Jan 11, 2012 7:54 pm

dingdong wrote:Your best bet would be to convert the heel/toe back to original foot pegs. I would never ride with my toe on the shifter. Constant pressure will surely cause premature wear and inadvertent shifting. Hit a bump and cause a down shift. Not good.

I thank you for the advice but this would not be an option due to the injured calf muscle. As for riding with the foot on the shifter causing undue wear, that is sound advice and was what I was looking for. Thank you.

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby WINGRIDER345 » Wed Jan 11, 2012 10:52 pm

Hi, I talked to myn gold wing guy about that very thing. He told that heel / toe shifters on the 1500's will cause the second gear to go out after a while if you ride with your foot on the shifter. The natural weight of your foot will put just enough pressure to want to make the gear want to move to the next gear. It would be like riding the cluch... :)

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby Okayamapiper » Wed Jan 11, 2012 11:58 pm

Thank you. I practiced a little today and am getting the hang of it without leaving my foot on the shifter. I guess everything takes getting used to. Came to Japan 20 years ago and had a fit as they drive on the left side of the road. Wiper and turn signal switches are opposite... Live and learn I guess. Thank you for the info.

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:43 am

Okayamapiper wrote:Thank you. I practiced a little today and am getting the hang of it without leaving my foot on the shifter. I guess everything takes getting used to. Came to Japan 20 years ago and had a fit as they drive on the left side of the road. Wiper and turn signal switches are opposite... Live and learn I guess. Thank you for the info.


Interesting - I visit the UK quite a bit and it only takes me a few minutes now to "switch" from left side/right side - however, the wiper and turn switches on the cars there are the same as they are here, even though they are right hand drive.

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby Okayamapiper » Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:22 am

WingAdmin wrote:Interesting - I visit the UK quite a bit and it only takes me a few minutes now to "switch" from left side/right side - however, the wiper and turn switches on the cars there are the same as they are here, even though they are right hand drive.

Driving isn't much of an issue when there are other cars on the road, but all alone and not paying attention, I've found myself on the wrong side of the road. The switches always confuse me, but then I use a bike for 90% of my driving.

Got the hang of the Markland. It's the low boy model, so I have to be careful in the twisties. A drawback is the floorboard bracket blocks the foot warmer vents so it may be time to break out the hacksaw, but I have the Hondaline foot warmers (valve cover covers) that are doing a pretty good job of keeping the toes toasty. I also managed to upgraded the cornering lights and headlamp to HID which was rather time consuming as I was on one leg. The HID in the cornering lights are mainly to be seen. Now I have to start thinking about an alternator upgrade....

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby WingAdmin » Sat Jan 14, 2012 2:04 pm

Okayamapiper wrote:
WingAdmin wrote:Interesting - I visit the UK quite a bit and it only takes me a few minutes now to "switch" from left side/right side - however, the wiper and turn switches on the cars there are the same as they are here, even though they are right hand drive.

Driving isn't much of an issue when there are other cars on the road, but all alone and not paying attention, I've found myself on the wrong side of the road. The switches always confuse me, but then I use a bike for 90% of my driving.


My introduction to left-hand road driving was on an extended work stint in Bermuda - but then, I was on a scooter all the time, so that made it quite a bit easier, as there was no getting used to driving from the wrong side at the same time to contend with. Mainly it was turns at a junction that I needed to get my head around - turning left or right into the (wrong) oncoming lane.

Funny story - my experience with roundabouts was limited to Bermuda and England, where they are everywhere. I'm quite used to them.

A couple years ago, visiting a friend in Toronto, I was driving us from her house to downtown. I came upon a roundabout, the first one I think I've seen in Canada. I naturally turned left onto it, as I have always done in the UK and Bermuda - and it was only the look of horror on my friend's face that told me something was wrong. Fortunately there was nobody coming the other way!

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby redial » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:27 am

This is hacking the thread, but coming from the other side, (we normally drive on the left hand side of the road), I have found that driving on the right hand side has been a bit of a challenge at times. Leaving fuel stops is one of them; turning right at intersections; and when overtaking tractor-trailers you seem to be inexorably drawn to the driving axles of the 18 wheeler. It also happens that we also get sucked to the lane boundry on the right hand side, so that you have to remain alert for the drumming of the ripple strips.

It is quite interesting to get into a car in a different country, and adapt to the local rules quickly, or else.....
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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby cardinal » Wed Feb 01, 2012 3:47 pm

WINGRIDER345 wrote:Hi, I talked to myn gold wing guy about that very thing. He told that heel / toe shifters on the 1500's will cause the second gear to go out after a while if you ride with your foot on the shifter. The natural weight of your foot will put just enough pressure to want to make the gear want to move to the next gear. It would be like riding the cluch... :)


I bought a '95 with 71k miles on it. It had a heel toe shifter and at 75k miles the fourth gear selector started rattling, which is why I swapped out the engine. I have never been able to confirm it, but I feel the problem was due the previous owner(s) riding around with their foot on the lever.

Any observations as to how many Goldwing tranny failures were on bikes with heel toe shifters?

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby vtxcandyred » Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:42 pm

cardinal wrote:
WINGRIDER345 wrote:Hi, I talked to myn gold wing guy about that very thing. He told that heel / toe shifters on the 1500's will cause the second gear to go out after a while if you ride with your foot on the shifter. The natural weight of your foot will put just enough pressure to want to make the gear want to move to the next gear. It would be like riding the cluch... :)


I bought a '95 with 71k miles on it. It had a heel toe shifter and at 75k miles the fourth gear selector started rattling, which is why I swapped out the engine. I have never been able to confirm it, but I feel the problem was due the previous owner(s) riding around with their foot on the lever.

Any observations as to how many Goldwing tranny failures were on bikes with heel toe shifters?

Sure hope its not BECAUSE you use a heel toe shifter. I just bought one and am using it. I am used to one though because I've had one on my VTX since I bought it in 2002. I never leave my foot on the shifter.

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Re: Markland heel/toe shifter

Postby toanogreen » Fri Apr 26, 2013 9:16 am

This is my second Goldwing. It had a heel toe shifter on it when I purchased it. I never used one before, but it only took about 2-3 rides to realize what I had been missing so long. I love it! To me it shifts easier than the "crank". It really helps me as I wear dress clothes to work every day and I don't scuff my shoes. Plus the floor boards are much more comfortable than the pegs. I also like the heel rest on the brake side, especially riding through town.
I agree as well that you should never rest your foot on the shifter. It puts pressure on the gears while the engine is running, and will probably cause wear and other issues over time.




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