lowering handel bars


Information and questions on GL1800 Goldwings (2001-Present)
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YAR
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Motorcycle: 2002 Wing GL1800 A

lowering handel bars

Postby YAR » Wed Dec 31, 2014 5:34 am



hi all
Wishing all members a happy New Year
I am Still on my quest for information regarding lowering handle bars from stock hight on my Gl1800 There seems to be after market bars which are very adjustable, but because of my stature ,and the fact I have dropped the wing whilst not moving I still believe, I would have more control over the weight of the bike if my bars were lower> I am fine with the way the bike handles around slow moving twisty bends ,etc. but have come to grief on sloping ground a couple of times, I have other bikes with straight bars and clip ons and prefer leaning forward when riding, suits my back problems, so can anybody tell me what the stock bar material is /as I am thinking along lines ,that I might get some used bars from a wreck and shorten them I.E cut and weld them shorter (them being as they are left and right), or has any body fitted the Heli bars ? can they be lowered than the stock bars fitted or maybe fitted upside down ???? have just done a 1000 klms Trip here in Aussie and the bike is awes em to ride Just this hic- up with the weight when moving real slow or stopped on xxxxx ground
Ray



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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby Red Ron » Mon Jan 05, 2015 11:09 am

There are several companies that sell shims which put the bars back closer to the rider and lower them at the same time. Kurykyn, Big Bike parts are a couple.

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93aspy
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby 93aspy » Wed Jan 07, 2015 10:31 am

I don't believe that I have ever seen (or read of any) handlebars shims that will LOWER the handle bars... The largest complaint on the 1800 is the bars are already too low and most riders (including me) want them raised... When I installed my MBL risers, they moved the bars up and back... If there are riser kits that lower the handlebars I am unaware of them...

http://wingstuff.com/products/2361-handlebar-risers-standard-or-tall-rider-version

Les
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olchris
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby olchris » Thu Jan 08, 2015 1:30 am

YAR wrote:hi all
Wishing all members a happy New Year
I am Still on my quest for information regarding lowering handle bars from stock hight on my Gl1800 There seems to be after market bars which are very adjustable, but because of my stature ,and the fact I have dropped the wing whilst not moving I still believe, I would have more control over the weight of the bike if my bars were lower> I am fine with the way the bike handles around slow moving twisty bends ,etc. but have come to grief on sloping ground a couple of times, I have other bikes with straight bars and clip ons and prefer leaning forward when riding, suits my back problems, so can anybody tell me what the stock bar material is /as I am thinking along lines ,that I might get some used bars from a wreck and shorten them I.E cut and weld them shorter (them being as they are left and right), or has any body fitted the Heli bars ? can they be lowered than the stock bars fitted or maybe fitted upside down ???? have just done a 1000 klms Trip here in Aussie and the bike is awes em to ride Just this hic- up with the weight when moving real slow or stopped on xxxxx ground
Ray


Please dont cut a weld handlebars together unless you are a competant TIG welder with NDT (testing) facilities/resource... Not something you want to snap off if ever involved in an accident.. Much better if they bend.. HAndle bars are cheap if you can determine dimensions..

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YAR
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Motorcycle: 2002 Wing GL1800 A

Re: lowering handel bars

Postby YAR » Thu Jan 08, 2015 4:16 am

Hi thanks for the advise, fortunately I have a family member who is a professional welder as for buying bars already shorter, are any produced to fit an 1800, as they are not tubular and are left and right, bolted on.
I was hoping to hear from somebody that has fitted Heli bars to find out for sure if they can be used to lower a standard bar. Heli have responded to my enquiry to find out if they can in fact be used upside down to lower the bars but have not given any details as to how they can be fitted. The system has stoppers which are intended as a fail safe if not secured properly, obviously
they are intended as a raiser bar adaptation and if fitted upside down how much lower than standard can they be adjusted

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Fatwing Chris
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby Fatwing Chris » Thu Jan 08, 2015 9:41 am

How much lower are you talking?The Kury risers that I purchased have shims that won't bring the bars back,but will raise or lower the end of the grips maybe an inch.Or are you talking about lowering everything so ride ride like a sport touring?
If I'da known it would last this long,I'da taken better care of it.
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby WingAdmin » Thu Jan 08, 2015 11:49 am

olchris wrote:Please dont cut a weld handlebars together unless you are a competant TIG welder with NDT (testing) facilities/resource... Not something you want to snap off if ever involved in an accident.. Much better if they bend.. HAndle bars are cheap if you can determine dimensions..


I agree. I extended and repositioned my wife's PC800 handlebars by cutting them and welding a pre-bent piece of 3/4" bar stock in between the cuts. I quickly realized I was way beyond my (very) meager welding skills on this rather critical item, and had a pro do it for me.

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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby Red Ron » Thu Jan 08, 2015 12:14 pm

93aspy wrote:I don't believe that I have ever seen (or read of any) handlebars shims that will LOWER the handle bars... The largest complaint on the 1800 is the bars are already too low and most riders (including me) want them raised... When I installed my MBL risers, they moved the bars up and back... If there are riser kits that lower the handlebars I am unaware of them...

http://wingstuff.com/products/2361-handlebar-risers-standard-or-tall-rider-version

Les


On my old 1800 it depended on the way you turned the shims. One way brought the handlebars back and up. The other way brought them back and down. Can't remember the brand for sure.

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93aspy
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby 93aspy » Thu Jan 08, 2015 11:12 pm

Thanks Ron - I stand corrected... My MBL's could only be used one way...

Les
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PastoT
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby PastoT » Tue Feb 10, 2015 3:56 pm

I can't add anything to modifying the handle bar or mounts but you mentioned something that I may have interpreted right or wrong. You mentioned stopping on un-level ground you had an issue. I too had an "issue" a couple times as my bike started to lean and I aggravated it by pulling handle bar inward while trying to bring everything vertical. Generally when one foot was much lower than the other upon stopping. If you pull the handle bar in toward you it will offset the front tire contact point enough to make the center of gravity transfer to the low side and the handle bar you've instinctively pulled in on! This can easily put the wing to sleep on its crash bars and the rest is an embarrassing PITA. If stopped on a slanted surface and starting to lean to one side and needs to be straighten upright make a deliberate act to keep the front wheel straight while pulling the seat back under you. I've had my wing sleep on me 3 times before I looked at the geometry of where the front tire contact patch is and it has never happened again, just don't pull the lower side handle bar in to you. The wing is just so heavy that if the tire contact patch is off center only an couple inches to one side the opposite side gets real heavy, fast!
Tom, in Mountain Home, Idaho
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby WingAdmin » Tue Feb 10, 2015 4:15 pm

PastoT wrote:I can't add anything to modifying the handle bar or mounts but you mentioned something that I may have interpreted right or wrong. You mentioned stopping on un-level ground you had an issue. I too had an "issue" a couple times as my bike started to lean and I aggravated it by pulling handle bar inward while trying to bring everything vertical. Generally when one foot was much lower than the other upon stopping. If you pull the handle bar in toward you it will offset the front tire contact point enough to make the center of gravity transfer to the low side and the handle bar you've instinctively pulled in on! This can easily put the wing to sleep on its crash bars and the rest is an embarrassing PITA. If stopped on a slanted surface and starting to lean to one side and needs to be straighten upright make a deliberate act to keep the front wheel straight while pulling the seat back under you. I've had my wing sleep on me 3 times before I looked at the geometry of where the front tire contact patch is and it has never happened again, just don't pull the lower side handle bar in to you. The wing is just so heavy that if the tire contact patch is off center only an couple inches to one side the opposite side gets real heavy, fast!


This is 100% correct. The front wheel of every motorcycle has caster - think like a shopping car wheel. This basically means the axle of the wheel (and hence the contact patch) is behind the pivot point around which the wheel rotates when steered. The distance between that pivot point and the center of the contact patch is called the trail.

Trail
Trail


The more trail, the more stable the bike is, and the harder to displace it from going straight ahead. Racing bikes have very little trail, to make them twitchy and maneuverable. Touring bikes have much more trail.

So when you turn the handlebars of the bike, the contact patch moves to one side or the other. In this picture, the handlebars have been turned to the left, which moves the contact patch of the tire to the right. This means there is more weight on the left side of the bike, because the center of balance has moved to the right:

Bike with wheel turned
Bike with wheel turned


So let's say you pull up to a stop. The bike starts to tip to the left. You grab the left handgrip and pull, to try to keep the bike upright. This turns the front wheel to the left, which moves the contact patch to the right. This puts even MORE weight on the left side of the bike, making it even harder to keep from tipping over to the left.

The correct thing to do when it starts tipping to the left is to immediately push the handlebars the opposite direction - to the right. This moves the contact patch to the left of the bike, putting more weight on the right side of the bike, and helping you correct the tipping motion.

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YAR
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Re: lowering handel bars

Postby YAR » Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:04 pm

PastoT wrote:I can't add anything to modifying the handle bar or mounts but you mentioned something that I may have interpreted right or wrong. You mentioned stopping on un-level ground you had an issue. I too had an "issue" a couple times as my bike started to lean and I aggravated it by pulling handle bar inward while trying to bring everything vertical. Generally when one foot was much lower than the other upon stopping. If you pull the handle bar in toward you it will offset the front tire contact point enough to make the center of gravity transfer to the low side and the handle bar you've instinctively pulled in on! This can easily put the wing to sleep on its crash bars and the rest is an embarrassing PITA. If stopped on a slanted surface and starting to lean to one side and needs to be straighten upright make a deliberate act to keep the front wheel straight while pulling the seat back under you. I've had my wing sleep on me 3 times before I looked at the geometry of where the front tire contact patch is and it has never happened again, just don't pull the lower side handle bar in to you. The wing is just so heavy that if the tire contact patch is off center only an couple inches to one side the opposite side gets real heavy, fast!


Hi Thanks for confirming what i did wrong the last time I allowed this to happen. I have since also Have analysed what happened and in effect you have hit it on the nail as I unnowingingley probly did pull the bar further round to my right in an effort to stop it going (to sleep )"great term this as I didn't chuck it down the road" we wern't moving and had just moved up alongside a couple of riders in front ,we were waiting to go around a small round about in the hills near Adelaide which was on a slight hill from left to right and of course the bars were already pointing slightly to the right I should have pulled the bars to the left slightly, but was so surprised with it going over immediately we stopped , I will always bear this in mind Again, I have always been used to lighter Pommy bikes and never had to think about the weight transference with them so much . Thanks to you and Wingmans advise, he has also followed up your input
Cheers Ray




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