GL1200LTD Project


Information and questions on GL1200 Goldwings (1984-1987)
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EasyBadger
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:32 pm
Location: Cochrane, AB, Canada
Motorcycle: 1982 GL 500 I
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (Project)

GL1200LTD Project

Post by EasyBadger » Thu May 10, 2018 10:03 pm



Hi everybody,

I'm very close to get a GL1200LTD as a project bike.

The first and most important part is to have the service manual.

Does somebody have a file for this bike?

I'll let everybody know how it is going.

Thanks for help.
Jens



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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1606
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD (X2), 2008 GL1800 (sold)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by Rednaxs60 » Fri May 11, 2018 9:41 am

Welcome from the west coast rock. Great bike for a project, have 2 of them and both on the road. See PM.

Good luck.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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EasyBadger
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:32 pm
Location: Cochrane, AB, Canada
Motorcycle: 1982 GL 500 I
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (Project)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by EasyBadger » Mon May 14, 2018 5:57 pm

I picked up the bike over the weekend in the Okanagen region which was a 625 km drive from my home one way. My son came with me to give me company.

The bike needs quiet a bit of work. It was sitting for 3 years. They said, it needs a starter and has electrical issues. After taking it a bit apart, I saw, there is much more going on. The battery which came with the bike was brand new (receipt from 2015) and didn´t charge over night. Will buy a new battery at first, replace all fluids and check out everything else. At least it came with the Clymer service book.

I keep you guys posted.

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Bike pickup
Bike pickup


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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1606
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD (X2), 2008 GL1800 (sold)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by Rednaxs60 » Mon May 14, 2018 7:47 pm

Bike looks pretty good, you will be impressed with the product when finished.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1606
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD (X2), 2008 GL1800 (sold)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by Rednaxs60 » Mon May 14, 2018 8:36 pm

To give a start, I'd suggest the following:

Make sure it turns over. Use the bolt on the end of the rotor/stator shaft.


Uses a 17 mm wrench. Turn the engine clockwise only.

For the starter, there are good tutorials on how to clean, install new brushes and put back together. Brushes can be purchased from a good alternator shop. Way cheaper than a new starter, have bought new and cleaned up the old. To change the starter on these bikes you will have to drop the exhaust, install new exhaust o-rings, and remove the exhaust stud closest to the starter. been through this a couple of times on both bikes and this is how it has to be done. You may want to change the exhaust studs and nuts for new, but if not would recommend you chase the studs and nuts with tap and die. If you do this work, there are small bits in the starter casing for alignment that you do not want to loose. Match mark the casing(s) for reassemble. I mention this because a new starter can cost over $200.00 CDN whereas a rebuild will cost you a set of brushes at $15.00 CDN. Don't break any wire connections inside the starter.

Highly recommend A small tap and die set from Canadian tire and get a couple of bottoming taps as well. Good investment, some of the bolts/studs/nuts will be very rusted. Use anti seize when installing. If you don'e install new, chase the studs/bolts/nuts before installing, makes life easier.

Change all fluids.

Check the fuel tank for rust/crud. Also run fuel through the fuel hose(s) and shut off valve until it flows freely. Had crud in the fuel lines when I started on mine.

For the fuel pump you might want to connect it directly to a battery to see if it works if not there are aftermarket units, but you can also go to an auto wrecker with the old pump and get one that is identical and works for a lot less money than a new aftermarket unit.

The same for the injectors. The ones that are in these bikes are very robust. Had the injectors on my bike in Victoria cleaned and flow tested, not a lot of difference between the before and after.

Use some Sea Foam in the tank or even Yamaha Ring Free to clean the system.

Once this is proven install new fuel pump and make sure it operates correctly. When the key is turned on, the fuel pump will operate for 2-3 seconds and shut off. The fuel pump will come on automatically as soon as the engine starts.

When you turn on the key, look at the ECU that is under the rear trunk and confirm the the lights come on as a self check and then go out. This will indicate to you that there are no faulty sensors. These lights can be viewed from the left side of the bike.

Having done this try and start the bike, may take a few tries but it should start. Do not rev the engine, but if you have to, keep the RPMs as low as possible 1100 to 1200.

Should the engine start then you can start on the maintenance issues.

Change the timing belts - Gates T070 or equivalent - time doesn't do these belts any favours. I have Dayco 95070 installed - $14.00 each.
New fuel filter - can't get an OEM so have to use a suitable alternative such as: Hastings GF159/Beck Arnley 043-0897/Fram G3969/NAPA 3556/WIX 33556/RFI-R86556 (this is the least expensive option and is installed on my second bike)

Rebuild the brake calipers and use new brake pads. The brake pads are the same front/rear. You will need to punch out the caliper pins. Be careful with the caliper pins on the left front caliper. These are longer than the right front and rear calipers and are scarce and no longer available from Honda. The shorter ones for the right front and rear calipers are still available from Honda. New dust and oil seals and cleaning of the caliper pistons is good maintenance. Expect the pivot pins to be seized as well and will need to be freed. These pivot pins allow the calipers to float/self align.

The TRAC collar/piston may be seized as well. Something to check. The rubber boots for the TRAC system and brake calipers are still available from Honda.

Check for oil leaks from valve cover gaskets and even the shifter oil seal.

You may find some of the switches may not work. A good contact cleaner and lube is all that is needed. Take you time when doing these as there are small bits in the switches that you do not want to loose.

Take off the rear and inspect the splines on the final drive, prop shaft and rear tire hub. Use a good moly paste such as Loctite LB8012 - bit expensive but will last for a long time.

This should get you started. I had a budget of approximately $2000.00 to get the bike roadworthy to include tires, brake system rebuild, external alt mod, battery, fuel pump, starter and other issues. Yours could be less.

Good luck. Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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EasyBadger
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:32 pm
Location: Cochrane, AB, Canada
Motorcycle: 1982 GL 500 I
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (Project)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by EasyBadger » Mon May 14, 2018 10:56 pm

Thanks Rednaxs60 for your tips.

I'll work through it step by step.

Cheers.

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Rednaxs60
Posts: 1606
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD (X2), 2008 GL1800 (sold)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by Rednaxs60 » Tue May 15, 2018 6:29 am

No worries - check the clutch and brake MCs as well. you will probably see a lot of grey muck in them. Clean the MCs well and flush with lots of new fluid. For the Clutch system, the clutch slave will be full of crud as well. Her are pics of the one I just did:




The parts for the clutch slave are available from Honda. You need a piston spring, piston oil seal and piston push rod seal.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

User avatar
EasyBadger
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:32 pm
Location: Cochrane, AB, Canada
Motorcycle: 1982 GL 500 I
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (Project)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by EasyBadger » Fri May 18, 2018 9:56 pm

It is unbelievable, what some people are riding with. I discovered, that the tires on the bike are from 2001. These people are suicidal.

My question is now, which are the best tires in relationship to price and mileage?

Save rides,
Jens

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 1606
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD (X2), 2008 GL1800 (sold)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sat May 19, 2018 5:02 am

I have Michelin Commander II tires on my '85 LTD in Victoria, and have 25,000 Km on them and not to the wear bars yet. I should expect another 5 Km out of them, but they may wear faster on the last half - time will tell. Use Ride On tire sealant and balancing formula instead of external weights. Have tried Counteract beads for balancing - these work as well, but prefer the Ride On formula. Keep the tires at 40 PSI as well. The Kms on this bike are city/highway, solo and two up touring (did 8,000 Kms two up touring last year).

The '85 LTD that I am putting on the road here in Ontario has Shinko Tourmaster tires from Fortnine installed and I'm using the Ride On formulas as well - 40 PSI per tire.

The Michelin Commanders are approximately $400.00 a set whereas the Shinko tires are $220.00 a set. Will be monitoring the Shinko tire wear when I travel across to Victoria. Lots of rubber on these tires.

The tires you settle on will depend on what your riding intentions are. If it's touring and lots of, I'd initially go with the Michelin, if not try the Shinko Tourmaster tires. Worst case is you need the better tires and change to the Michelin.

Another consideration in the longevity of the tires is the bike suspension. I would expect that the bike you just picked up probably has not had the suspension upgraded or renewed. After 34 years it gets soft and this affects the tires severely. New front fork springs and rear air shock springs would enhance the ride quality and performance of the bike. You should change the oil in the front forks if the bike has been sitting for a while and putting in a set of new springs would be a benefit. You can get Progressive and Race Tech springs for the front forks.

Race Tech also provides emulator valves that, with the race tech springs, emulates a monotube shock absorber insert. I have the Race Tech front fork springs and gold valve emulators. I find these to work well. You have to modify the lower fork tube and disable the TRAC braking system to install this setup.

There is another company, Traxxion, that has a setup for the 1200 but it is the most expensive.

The rear air shocks are a different issue, more involved to refurbish. I put Progressive series 412 non-air shocks on my bike in Victoria, and will be installing a set on this bike here in Ontario. These give a good ride and bike performance. Only con for doing this is that you have to remove the saddlebags to adjust the shocks. I have mine set on level 4 for solo and two up round town and short trip riding. For extended rides I put the shocks to max because of the added luggage.

Just a few more thoughts to consider.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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SilverDave
Posts: 503
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:39 am
Location: Langley, BC
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 GoldWing Aspy

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by SilverDave » Sat May 19, 2018 10:36 am

Once you punch out the brake pad pins (5.8 mm drift ... I use a cut-off phillips screwdriver which had 5.8 mm shaft )
then.. ....
since those pins are no longer available ,
.... chuck them in a drill press, and " Turn " them down to less than 6 mm, with emery cloth .

When they are the right size, less than 6.00 , all along the shaft ( Digital caliber tool ? )
they will slide in with a small drop of oil and just your baby finger ...

and out again,, two years later with just a 5.8 mm wooden dowel, and a gentle push .... LOL

SilverDave

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SilverDave
Posts: 503
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 9:39 am
Location: Langley, BC
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 GoldWing Aspy

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by SilverDave » Sat May 19, 2018 10:42 am

Many of my 1200 friends and I use Dunlops E3 or E4 .....a long wearing bias tire

Good mileage, great handling on a 1200, and often a good price from ITC ....
Michelins are also good , too.

I am always a bit suspicious of Shinko Tires or any cheaper tire ....the 1200 is a pretty heavy bike .

SilverDave

User avatar
EasyBadger
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:32 pm
Location: Cochrane, AB, Canada
Motorcycle: 1982 GL 500 I
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (Project)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by EasyBadger » Sat May 19, 2018 7:18 pm

I found the Michelin Commander 2 tires for a great price on Amazon. Front tire for $200 and the rear tire for $300 with only $5 each for shipping. I ordered them right away.

Safe rides,
Jens

rcgreg
Posts: 173
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 11:46 am
Location: Creston BC Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 Limited

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by rcgreg » Sat May 19, 2018 9:19 pm

which ever way you go, you will find the bike worth the investment
I love mine - best handling big bike i have ever had super solid on the road.

User avatar
EasyBadger
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:32 pm
Location: Cochrane, AB, Canada
Motorcycle: 1982 GL 500 I
1985 GL 1200 Ltd (Project)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by EasyBadger » Sun May 20, 2018 5:11 pm

Today I took the bike more apart. I don´t know if the pads are down, however the disks are all on their minimum thickness.

Any suggestions where I can get new break disks? OEM are not available any more. I´ll put in new pads anyways for safety reasons.

Safe rides,
Jens

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 1606
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD (X2), 2008 GL1800 (sold)

Re: GL1200LTD Project

Post by Rednaxs60 » Sun May 20, 2018 7:36 pm

Look on eBay for some good aftermarket ones. Here is another site to visit: http://www.straightwings.com/ He has some rotors available. Check the parts fiche and you will find that the rotors for most of the 1200s and years will interchange. The 1984 Aspencade rotors will fit. New aftermarket rotors will cost you $1000.00 CDN for the three - these can be purchased through Fortnine - did this on my '85 LTD 2 1/2 years ago - definitely an ouch.

Fortnine site page is: https://fortnine.ca/en/ebc-oe-replacement-rotor

Good luck - Cheers


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

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