Safety riding courses......


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by DJnRF » Wed Nov 25, 2015 9:55 pm



WingAdmin wrote:I find it interesting that every time I've taken it, the instructors ride (and demonstrate the maneuvers on) GL1500's.
When teaching these classes one gets a lot of practice. Some do even more extensive practice just to be
able to show that things can be done, and on most any motorcycle.


"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
Dark Angel
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun Sep 20, 2015 6:15 pm
Location: Casey, Il
Motorcycle: 2015 GL1800

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by Dark Angel » Fri Nov 27, 2015 7:25 pm

The course is interesting. As a off road racer the techniques are quite different than what we are taught and practice in our advanced courses. Especially not keeping a finger on the front brake at all times and never using more than one finger. Same with the clutch, never more than 2 and cover at all times. Not being afraid to lock the rear, always shifting forward to break, lots of weight on the front, down shift rev matching, touch clutch upshifts, elbows up. Vision vision vision aware aware aware pick a line, when in doubt throttle out! I have immense respect and admire the instructors of all disciplines.
The world is full of kings and queens who blind your eyes and steal your dreams it's heaven and hell. RJD

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 1861
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by Rednaxs60 » Mon Jan 11, 2016 1:58 pm

This is an older thread, but the new year is here. I got back into riding in 2014 on a 2007 Suzuki C90T. Found it had a mind of its own so I set out to find a course to get my skills up to speed. Took the Advanced Riding Course in Sidney, BC. The instructors were 2 Saanich police bike cops. Two day course, lunch provided and rain or shine. The weekend I did it, it rained which is actually a bonus. The course aim was to improve everyone's riding skills regardless of the bike. We had everything from the "rice rocket" to fully dressed Harleys. The course put us through the intersection, keyhole, figure eights, cone slalom, controlled braking/accident avoidance, and much more. By the end of the weekend, everyone had improved immensely - no one gets sent home. This course was done using 1st gear only, and very little brake.

The fact that it rained was also a benefit. Everyone was concentrating on the skills being developed such that the rain issue did not enter the equation. It's amazing how much traction the bike has when the road is wet.

I did the course for a second time when I bought the '08 GW (different bike, different handling). I also took the Lee Park's Total Control Advanced Riding Clinic in San Fransisco, and the Roadcraft Control Skills Upgrade Course in Richmond, BC on the '08 GW. Took the Roadcraft course because one of the lead instructors has been a GWRRA single and two-up top gun champion on his 1800. He is extremely talented on his GW.

You also meet like minded riders on these courses. It's interesting to exchange experiences.

Found another 4 day course in Seattle that is based on the motorcop curriculum. It has a test at the end, but even so, after 4 days your skill level has to be significantly better.

Looking for another course this year. haven't decided which on to go to, but I will be taking one on the '85 GW.

Cheers

Ernest
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

User avatar
2008retiredplb
Posts: 229
Joined: Wed Aug 12, 2009 6:58 am
Location: Rockford, IL
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 now a 2016 HTS1800 RoadSmith Trike
2001 GL1800
1998 1100 Honda Shadow ACE
1972 Honda CL450

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by 2008retiredplb » Tue Jan 12, 2016 9:06 am

Rednaxs60 wrote:This is an older thread, but the new year is here. I got back into riding in 2014 on a 2007 Suzuki C90T. Found it had a mind of its own so I set out to find a course to get my skills up to speed. Took the Advanced Riding Course in Sidney, BC. The instructors were 2 Saanich police bike cops. Two day course, lunch provided and rain or shine. The weekend I did it, it rained which is actually a bonus. The course aim was to improve everyone's riding skills regardless of the bike. We had everything from the "rice rocket" to fully dressed Harleys. The course put us through the intersection, keyhole, figure eights, cone slalom, controlled braking/accident avoidance, and much more. By the end of the weekend, everyone had improved immensely - no one gets sent home. This course was done using 1st gear only, and very little brake.

The fact that it rained was also a benefit. Everyone was concentrating on the skills being developed such that the rain issue did not enter the equation. It's amazing how much traction the bike has when the road is wet.

I did the course for a second time when I bought the '08 GW (different bike, different handling). I also took the Lee Park's Total Control Advanced Riding Clinic in San Fransisco, and the Roadcraft Control Skills Upgrade Course in Richmond, BC on the '08 GW. Took the Roadcraft course because one of the lead instructors has been a GWRRA single and two-up top gun champion on his 1800. He is extremely talented on his GW.

You also meet like minded riders on these courses. It's interesting to exchange experiences.

Found another 4 day course in Seattle that is based on the motorcop curriculum. It has a test at the end, but even so, after 4 days your skill level has to be significantly better.

Looking for another course this year. haven't decided which on to go to, but I will be taking one on the '85 GW.

Cheers

Ernest
You have the best attitude on safe riding I have seen in a long time. Congratulations for making yourself and others safer on the motorcycling roads. I hope you continue to encourage others to GET TRAINED, It just might save their life someday. As I have said before "You Can Not have too much training". Being a GWRRA Level 4 Senior Master Tour Rider has made me a better and safer rider. I am able to do things with my 2009 Goldwing that I never thought I could ever do.
Keep safe
Gene
"Love to ride and ride to love"

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 1861
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by Rednaxs60 » Tue Jan 12, 2016 12:52 pm

Gene - thanks for the comments. One thing about a course is it makes you do things you woud not normally practice. It's easy doing figure eights, u-turns, the slow race, maybe some cone work, but the more intricate skills such as the intersection, keyhole, and others are not so easily put into ones practice regime. The harder the skill pattern, the easier it is to not do on your own; hence another reason I like courses, you have to do the curriculum. I fnd these courses are cheap insurance especially since the price of a course is only a few cases of beer here in Canada. Cheers

Ernest
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

User avatar
2008retiredplb
Posts: 229
Joined: Wed Aug 12, 2009 6:58 am
Location: Rockford, IL
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 now a 2016 HTS1800 RoadSmith Trike
2001 GL1800
1998 1100 Honda Shadow ACE
1972 Honda CL450

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by 2008retiredplb » Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:16 pm

I fully agree Rednaxs60
"Love to ride and ride to love"

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 1861
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by Rednaxs60 » Tue Jan 12, 2016 2:45 pm

Convinced a friend who rides a Triumph Rocket to take the advanced course with me last year and he has been grateful. His confidence level went up and he now does low speed riding that he never thought he would. It works. Cheers

Ernest
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

MICK MACK
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 11:06 pm
Location: Northern Mexico
Motorcycle: 85 GL 1200 A

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by MICK MACK » Thu Jan 21, 2016 3:57 am

OH THIS SAFETY THING!!!!! WHEN IS IT GOING TO ... BLOW OVER!!!!! SLOW DOWN AND STAY BACK, expect people to treat u like u are invisible on a MC. EVERYTHING will try to put you DOWN... leaves, sand, gravel, "cagers," dogs, cats, rabbits, deer (forest rats), potholes... the list is endless. I watched the Safety MC videos on YouTube and read the safety books I got off of E bay. it is unfortunate not to be able to spend the $250 to take the 2 day class... but I watched them on YouTube and it really did NOT look like $250 worth of "instructions" and riding an older bike with a tired clutch... I don't need to be doing any more USELESS starts/stops just to show someone that it/I can start stop in a little box painted on the pavement from a blistering 20 mph, I can do that myself coming up to ALL THE RED LIGHTS that ALL LIGHTS ARE (red).

~75% of the car/bike "accidents" (incidents is what they are called now as 95% of the "accidents" are HUMAN ERROR, not mechanical failure) are caused by people in cars/trucks not "SEEING" the person on the MC. about the same for BIG TRUCK "accidents"... and so many of them do NOT practice APPROPRIATE FOLLOWING DISTANCE (it takes ~600' to stop a BIG TRUCK AT 60mph... I see trucks that are 40' behind the vehicle in front of them as so many of "professional" truck drives NEVER took any kind of DRIVING class or PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVING CLASS, they "grandfathered" into truck driving by just doing it way back when there was no REAL TRAINING required to operate a BIG TRUCK. How they have not run over someone is a total mystery to me?

if we have APPROPRIATE FOLLOWING DISTANCE (a block in town and a mile on the highway) that gives us plenty of time to SEE THINGS that are about to happen. yes I know, it is virtually impossible to keep that kind of distance as someone will "take the distance" (as if any of us are REALLY going to GET ANYWHERE ANY SOONER by CONSTANTLY "jockeying" for position in traffic... when EVERY LIGHT IS RED) but that is the way it goes. if speed limit is 65, do 63, that way ppl are always passing and going on down the highway away from us so we DO NOT get TOO CLOSE to the vehicle in front of us.

Stay one vehicle length away from the car parked in front of us at the stop sign/light with front wheel slightly turned to the side of the car/trucks, that way if someone does hit us from behind at the stop sign/light we can ricochet between the cars instead of being smashed in between them ... like a bug... as EVERYONE IS ON THE PHONE and TOO BUSY TO PAY ATTENTION TO THEIR DRIVING. oh well, buying $4 books and reading them worked for me... the rest... I will just have to figure out on my own... as so many others have done before me.


User avatar
Happytrails
Posts: 818
Joined: Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:13 pm
Location: Tarentum, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: 1991 Goldwing 1500 SE
2018 Ural GearUp

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by Happytrails » Thu Jan 21, 2016 6:07 am

Always good to practice and stay sharp especially in spring. :D
1991 GL1500 SE Anniversary Edition
Sun Flare Gold Metallic
Vallant Brown Inset

User avatar
2008retiredplb
Posts: 229
Joined: Wed Aug 12, 2009 6:58 am
Location: Rockford, IL
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 now a 2016 HTS1800 RoadSmith Trike
2001 GL1800
1998 1100 Honda Shadow ACE
1972 Honda CL450

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by 2008retiredplb » Mon Jan 25, 2016 2:04 pm

MICK MACK wrote: OH THIS SAFETY THING!!!!! WHEN IS IT GOING TO ... BLOW OVER!!!!! SLOW DOWN AND STAY BACK, expect people to treat u like u are invisible on a MC. EVERYTHING will try to put you DOWN... leaves, sand, gravel, "cagers," dogs, cats, rabbits, deer (forest rats), potholes... the list is endless. I watched the Safety MC videos on YouTube and read the safety books I got off of E bay. it is unfortunate not to be able to spend the $250 to take the 2 day class... but I watched them on YouTube and it really did NOT look like $250 worth of "instructions" and riding an older bike with a tired clutch... I don't need to be doing any more USELESS starts/stops just to show someone that it/I can start stop in a little box painted on the pavement from a blistering 20 mph, I can do that myself coming up to ALL THE RED LIGHTS that ALL LIGHTS ARE (red).

~75% of the car/bike "accidents" (incidents is what they are called now as 95% of the "accidents" are HUMAN ERROR, not mechanical failure) are caused by people in cars/trucks not "SEEING" the person on the MC. about the same for BIG TRUCK "accidents"... and so many of them do NOT practice APPROPRIATE FOLLOWING DISTANCE (it takes ~600' to stop a BIG TRUCK AT 60mph... I see trucks that are 40' behind the vehicle in front of them as so many of "professional" truck drives NEVER took any kind of DRIVING class or PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVING CLASS, they "grandfathered" into truck driving by just doing it way back when there was no REAL TRAINING required to operate a BIG TRUCK. How they have not run over someone is a total mystery to me?

if we have APPROPRIATE FOLLOWING DISTANCE (a block in town and a mile on the highway) that gives us plenty of time to SEE THINGS that are about to happen. yes I know, it is virtually impossible to keep that kind of distance as someone will "take the distance" (as if any of us are REALLY going to GET ANYWHERE ANY SOONER by CONSTANTLY "jockeying" for position in traffic... when EVERY LIGHT IS RED) but that is the way it goes. if speed limit is 65, do 63, that way ppl are always passing and going on down the highway away from us so we DO NOT get TOO CLOSE to the vehicle in front of us.

Stay one vehicle length away from the car parked in front of us at the stop sign/light with front wheel slightly turned to the side of the car/trucks, that way if someone does hit us from behind at the stop sign/light we can ricochet between the cars instead of being smashed in between them ... like a bug... as EVERYONE IS ON THE PHONE and TOO BUSY TO PAY ATTENTION TO THEIR DRIVING. oh well, buying $4 books and reading them worked for me... the rest... I will just have to figure out on my own... as so many others have done before me.

I can agree with the fact that many things can cause an accident while riding on a motorcycle, but wouldn't you rather be trained on how to ride safely? So many cycle riders learned from their friends or family 10, 20 or even 50 years ago. Did you learn on a dirt bike? Now are you riding a touring bike. Do you think things have changed over those years? The motorcycle has changed so much from the first cycle I rode, to the Goldwing I ride today and now with so many switching to trikes it even gets more complicated.
I wish you could have been at our district rally this past weekend when we had a Illinois State Police Motor Officer give a safety presentation on riding a motorcycle.
Two of the things that affect motorcycle riding, Braking and Cornering. Get these totally correct and you have just learned to lower your chances of having a fatal motorcycle crash and possibly walking away from a crash with minimal or no injuries. Without proper practice, proper gear and knowing how to avoid a crash, you are increasing those chances of a major injury in an accident.
Do you know how to properly use your brakes, how much front brake, how much rear brake, know how and when to use Trail Braking, using the "V" in cornering to bring your bike more upright, do you know what the suspension does when you brake or "roll off" or "roll on" the throttle, do you know where to look in your turns, do you know what the traction pie is and how it affects riding? Now add a passenger and it gets more complicated. The are proven methods of control on a motorcycle. You most likely could never learn them without being instructed in the proper application of them. Riders learn some very bad habits over the years when they never take a riding class. I know people that have taken a class at the age of 60, 70 and 80 years old after riding 100,000 plus miles, that said they learned a lot by taking a certified class. Things they never taught when they stared to ride. They had all those miles and years to pick up their bad habits. Even though they had not had an serious accident up to then, they felt more prepared in case they encountered a situation where they needed those skills.
Is a $250 rider course cheaper than spending months recovering from a motorcycle accident or losing your life? You do as you wish in your case, but for me the cost of training is far cheaper and less painful than any accident. I am lucky that I belong to an organization, GWRRA, that offers those courses at a very reasonable price here in Illinois. I take a course, ARC or ERC class every two years. This year I will take another safety course, because I will be new to riding a trike, even though I took the 2 wheel course last year. I also am a Level Four Senior Master Tour Rider in the GWRRA Safety program. That means I must keep certified in Medic first Aid, have taken a rider safety course at least every three years, and "Wear All the Gear All the Time". I know my training has saved my life, and my wives life, at least two times.
"Love to ride and ride to love"

User avatar
Fatboy46
Posts: 86
Joined: Sat Jul 04, 2015 8:16 am
Location: DFW Texas
Motorcycle: 1997 Goldwing 1500 Aspencade with Roadsmith Trike kit

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by Fatboy46 » Wed Feb 03, 2016 5:28 pm

RE: MICK MACK's statement about 'accidents being mostly the auto drivers fault-- indeed... but an AWARE rider LOOKS for those situations, and avoids them. Can you avoid the red light runner when you are in the middle of the intersection and your view was blocked by a truck? - BUT if you looked when you could see- behind the truck- you might have see it coming- or even if you just didn't get out there because you couldn't see traffic... just because the light is green your way, doesn't mean it is safe to go..honking horns behind you won't harm you at all...
AWARE, AWARE , AWARE ALL around you. Look and listen.

User avatar
urbanmadness
Posts: 241
Joined: Sat Feb 15, 2014 3:31 pm
Location: Sacramento, California
Motorcycle: 1982 Gl1100A Aspencade *sold
1989 GL1500 Aspencade

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by urbanmadness » Mon Feb 22, 2016 5:12 pm

I'm trying to convince my friend to take the course with me.... I hope he goes in it with an open mind. He's one of those guys that has been "riding" for years and has a little bit of an ego. I know, not only that I have a lot to learn but I have a lot to UN-Learn.

Yeah, I've been watching a few youtube videos about what to expect and what they are looking for, and I found I already have some bad habits. One of my biggest is how I shut my bike down. I put her in neutral, throw the kickstand down and shut her off at the key. If I'm on a slight hill (I avoid hills), put it in gear. From what I understand, they want us to leave it in gear, hit the kill switch then put down the kickstand (is that the approved procedure?). So here is what I"m doing now. Kill switch with it in gear, and kickstand down. Not a big deal, but yes, safer.

My worse habit tho, is I'm a three finger clutch guy. I guess from what I've seen on youtube, you are suppose to use all four fingers. This one is proving harder to break and I don't feel I have the control that I do using three fingers. I'm practicing that one now, every time I ride... but that is gonna be a harder habit to break and I have to think about it, which is not good. Good god it's like trying to learn to ride all over again.

My braking could probably use some work. I tend to use a lot of rear brake and I use the front and rear for stopping but I drag the rear bake a lot in turns etc. I also use the rear while stopping gently, parking lot speeds). (I ride in stop and go a lot), so I probably need to work on using both brakes more. If I'm slowing down in a hurry I use both and I use both for most stopping but I do tend to use the rear more then I should.

I have been riding big bikes for about 2 years and yes, I'm getting ready for the course. The thing is, if I had taken this course sooner, my bad habits wouldn't of been as ingrained and much easier to correct.

I'm also concerned about riding a 250. I'm a big guy with very huge, UN-coordinated feet. My roommate has a 250 nighthawk and I find shifting that thing, difficult. Not the shifting but, getting my feet in there to actually shift it. I had the same problem with my buddies GL1200. My gl1100 is fine, and my GL1500 is fine, but I found the 1200 difficult for me to shift (although the shift lever may of been bent on that bike, judging from all the other mess going on with that bike).

For the people that have taken the course, do you think it would help me, if I spent a little time on the little 250?

What bad habits did you learn you had when you took the course?

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 1861
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by Rednaxs60 » Mon Feb 22, 2016 5:34 pm

The best part of these safety courses is the people you meet. Everyone is on equal ground regardless of how long you have been riding. The cones that are used are to intimidate you and add stress to the learning process, it's like colouring and staying within the lines; however, riding over cones doesn't hurt your bike. I take a course a year, especially if I am on a new to me bike. I always learn something, and I refresh my skill set. You will do skill patterns on a course that you won't necessarily do on a regular basis after the course. A course helps you confront your bad habits, but more importantly, it gives you a better appreciation for your riding skills, and your confidence level. Have fun, enjoy the people and it will be a rewarding experience. Cheers

Ernest
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

User avatar
OldZX11Rider
Posts: 1207
Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:25 am
Location: Garfield, Arkansas
Motorcycle: 1994 Honda GL1500 Goldwing SE

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by OldZX11Rider » Tue Feb 23, 2016 10:39 pm

I've never taken the MSF safe riding course of any kind. Back in the late '80's I was a GWRRA member and the chapter itself put on some safe riding courses.
Things I learned back then, I still use. It also made me a safer driver in my cars.

I'm not against any safe rider courses. Plenty of people need them. I'm sure I would benefit greatly from one of these courses, but now I'm retired and on a fixed income, having an extra $250 at the same time as a course is put on is slim.
One thing I learned that's kept me out of an accident at least twice, is having an escape route. Both times coming up behind stopped traffic at a red light.
If I hadn't been watching my mirrors, I would have been a cycle sandwich.
There's always more to learn. :)
For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain:

dthorntonministries
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 8:14 pm
Location: Fairfield, TX
Motorcycle: "2000SE Honda Goldwing" "1985 Honda Goldwing Aspencade"

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by dthorntonministries » Sun Jun 03, 2018 9:36 pm

In Texas we pretty much ride the year round.
After riding for some 40 years, I took the MSF Course at Ft. Hood, Texas. Like you, I couldn't believe the things I learned about some things I was already doing....to some degree.

One thing I left with was the understanding of counter-steering. What a transformation in the way I ride now. It take the stress out of riding.

You asked what I do to prepare. I am fortunate to have a 3/4 of a block of paved parking lot across from my home. It belongs to my church. At least once or twice a week I ride over and circle the entire lot, then reverse and ride around the other way. The lot has three rows of parking spaces. I, then make a figure 8 around the lot and then circle around the three parking rows in a modified figure 8 with one extra circle. After that i weave through the parking spaces on each row, after which I weave through the inside of the parking rows, until I've ridden all three. lastly, I make tight 360 degree circles, reversing direction on each circle until I reach the other end of the parking lot. It amounts to decreasing circles, both left and right. Sometimes i practice panic stops, trying to not lock the brakes. It all helps when you find yourself in situation where you only have time to react. As a professional vocalist, I was taught that "You will perform, how you practice" The same principle applies to motorcycles. "You will ride like you practice." Take some time to learn how to turn. If you can't do it slow, you probably don't need to be doing it fast. Stay safe.

User avatar
2008retiredplb
Posts: 229
Joined: Wed Aug 12, 2009 6:58 am
Location: Rockford, IL
Motorcycle: 2009 GL1800 now a 2016 HTS1800 RoadSmith Trike
2001 GL1800
1998 1100 Honda Shadow ACE
1972 Honda CL450

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by 2008retiredplb » Wed Jun 06, 2018 1:01 pm

Just got back from a 1440 mile trip to Missouri and Arkansas this Tuesday.
Riding down we had 5 bikes, each two up, most have been riding for a while and are good riders. What I found out was just a few suggestions to one of the riders, who has never or been a long time since taking a riding class, made him do much better on the ride home. We even give him the opportunity to be the ride leader on part of the trip home. It was a drastic improvement from his ride down. I think I have convinced him to take a few riding classes when they become available. Classes like the Advanced Rider Class, Road Captain class and if still given, a Team Riding class. Also for his wife/co-rider the Co-rider class.

One of our group that we rode with on a ride while down their, did it all wrong in how he tried telling this rider that he needed to take the classes. (same classes I mentioned above.) His suggestion was very counter productive and made that rider very mad. Even though this rider did need some instruction, it was not the best way to convince him to take the classes.

Just things like keeping in the proper track durning a ride, keeping the correct separation and stagger from other riders in the group, and on twisty roads, keeping your eye on the road and your driving, not looking at the scenery. Leave that to the co-rider, or when you are not in areas where you need to keep alert with eyes on the road at all times.

I did it by letting him know that he was a good rider but he could improve a lot by having these classes. Why would you not want to be a better and safer rider if you could do it by taking some training. I do think it will go well for him in the future as he gains some instruction from the Ride Instructors. Just a couple of things I told him to watch or do, made a great improvement for him and also the group we were riding with.

Here in Illinois we are lucky to have some of the finest Ride Coaches in GWRRA and our riding classes are very inexpensive compared to other courses offered by other groups including MSF instructors.

My big thing is encourage other riders to take the time to get some professional ride instruction from a trained and qualified ride instructor. You will never regret this type of training. Even riders that have been riding for years come away with something every time that take a class like these.

Keep Safe out there and Have Fun.
"Love to ride and ride to love"

airedale
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2017 9:39 am
Location: new braunfels texas
Motorcycle: 2004 goldwing, 2006 vtx 1300

Re: Safety riding courses......

Post by airedale » Mon Jul 02, 2018 12:34 pm

I took an experinced rider's course a couple of years back, after riding for 30 plus years. Like many who have already posted I learned a fair amout. What suprised me was the instructor saying that the techniques he was teaching probably benefited folks riding large touring bikes more than sport bikes becasue we have so little ground clearance. I'm fortunate to to travel some good back roads with twists and turns on my way to work so I get to practice setting up and entering turns almost every day. At least once or twice a week I practice emergency stops, and really appreciate the practice when someone turns in front of me.

I plan on retaking the experinced course every three or four years as a refresher.



Post Reply