Ham radio licensees?


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
User avatar
Bob Myers
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:15 pm
Location: Richmond Ky
Motorcycle: 1995 GL1500 Aspencade

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by Bob Myers » Tue Feb 03, 2015 11:14 pm



I fail to understand how that can be considered a groundless antenna. A true groundless setup uses the coax unconnected on the end for a counterpoise.


1995 GW Interstate w/Champion Escort sidecar, Dart trailer.
1993 GW Interstate-my commuter
1986 Yamaha Venture

User avatar
N2PPN
Posts: 258
Joined: Tue Apr 13, 2010 3:24 pm
Location: Lawnguyland New Yawk
Motorcycle: Me on my 1981 GL1100 at Jones Beach in 1984

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by N2PPN » Wed Feb 04, 2015 9:41 am

The ANTENNA is a RADIALESS design DC grounded type. It DOES NOT REQUIRE a growing to work. Adding a frame ground as a counterpoise DOES NOT affect the antenna's performance. It works just as well mounted to a slab of fiberglass or through the metal trunk/roof of your car....
It could be mounted in your wing's trunk lid or on a metal mirror type mount to a saddlebag rail like on my bike. Won't affect how antenna performs at all.

Rich
N2PPN
Don't Worry,
Ride Happy!

User avatar
Bob Myers
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:15 pm
Location: Richmond Ky
Motorcycle: 1995 GL1500 Aspencade

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by Bob Myers » Wed Feb 04, 2015 10:07 am

I have read Diamonds claim and seen pattern models of their claims. I also have seen their and other "radial-less" antenna swept with a FS meter. It don't work near as well as they claim. A true groundless pattern is much better. But, if it works for you then it works. If I run across one of those i'll give it a try before dismissing it. A version of it is still available for about $53.
Was reading about a larson groundless, and it claimed pretty good pattern and such but man-o-man are they proud of them

When I first started reading about your antenna I misinterpreted what I was reading, I was all excited about finding a "no ground plane" type antenna for my wing, your radial-less is a different monster.
Last edited by Bob Myers on Wed Feb 04, 2015 11:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
1995 GW Interstate w/Champion Escort sidecar, Dart trailer.
1993 GW Interstate-my commuter
1986 Yamaha Venture

User avatar
redbug
Posts: 525
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Broken Arrow,Ok
Motorcycle: 1983 Gl1100I
1986 Harley FLHT

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by redbug » Wed Feb 04, 2015 11:52 am

Wingadmin, thank you. February 14th,we all know what that is. Already did that. She has a brand new Shoei helmet, five hundred pounds of top soil, mulch, potting soil, and her seed order from the Burpee seed catalog is on it's way. Well I fed her too.
For me, It's test day for the Technician Class license. For the last couple days I have been on HamStudy.org finding out what I remember and what has changed. I know my weak areas and will concentrate on those for sure. Always been a dx'er of sorts, with a old 5 tube am radio sitting on a lazy susan (couldn't turn the house around) pulling in stations. You always new when someone in the house hold would get up a night to go to the bathroom , or when the fridge would kick on.
A ham I am ,but a ham I'm not. So thanks for the renewed interest, now I can get that burr out from under the saddle and rest easy.
" Riding on Tulsa Time "

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Wed Feb 04, 2015 12:00 pm

I always see where skeptics of Ham radio wonder about what benefit it
is to anyone. I will attempt to clarify the benefits. First, a bit of history.

Back in the 1900's, radio was in the infancy period. Many interested in
this new form of wireless communication were in a time of a lot of
experimenting. Some people even started local radio stations. Some
of those became quite well known. People could listen to regular
commercial broadcasts of many things. However, back in those days
there was no regulation of radio, and at times some experimenter
was on the air with his radio on the same frequency as the commercial
station, and it just became a battle of who had the most power to
overwhelm the other.

This 'battle' went on until WW 1. The government then stepped in and
outlawed all radio 'experimenting'. They allowed some commercial
stations to remain on the air to inform people about the war. The
radio 'amateurs' as they were called were not able to do any more
radio experimenting. The only way they could continue was to join
the military, and get into radio there. That was a huge benefit to
them as the government bought anything they needed to work to improve radio communications for the war effort.

After the war the ban on amateur experimenting remained. That
is when the formerly formed ARRL (formed by Hiram P. Maxim in
1914), through supporters managed to finally get started with
what became the FCC in 1927. Their efforts kept gaining ground
with what we know as Amateur Radio today by getting official
sanction to operate, and the allocation of frequencies.

The very first officials of the FCC then were some of those amateurs.
The whole idea of amateur radio is to encourage the practice, a
and experiments in communications. It is those amateurs that have
given us the myriad of systems we have today. Continued work
by these, so-called amateurs is what also invents new systems.
In this process many clubs are formed, new friends met, and new
places visited by radio, or in person. All through the interest, and
contacts.

With their knowledge, and ability in communications that is not
restricted from constant experimenting, amateurs have become
the single most important network of emergency communication.
Almost every ESDA (Civil Defense) organization in the country
uses 'Ham' radio operators on their own frequencies, as well as
others set aside for local communications, for all disaster
communications.

Have you ever heard of the MARS program? Military Affiliate
Radio. It is all amateur radio operators that operate this system.
They handle all the wide spread 'special' communications traffic
for the military. Not just disaster, or war related, either. Ever
hear where military people all over the world call home to their
family and friends? This is handled by amateur radio operators.

Amateur radio was, and is intended to be a fun hobby where
experimenting with radio communications is important, but it
also is a means to meet new friends, find new places, and join
in with a program that is designed for the benefit of all people.
AND, do not forget that your TV, and cell phones are also very
much a part of this program and organization. If the amateurs
didn't exist, neither would these.

Many years ago I had studied and gotten my Novice license, then
before even receiving it passed my code at 13 wpm for my
General Class license. However, by the time it was to be
renewed I had passed my 1st Class license. At the time I did
not renew as I had decided that I was in radio as a professional
for the money, not for the pleasure. My license expired over
fifty years ago now. Of course, now that I am old, I still have
my lifetime radio-telephone license, but I am again thinking of
going back into amateur radio.

I still work on equipment. (even though retired, and had closed
down my business. I did not get rid of my equipment.) All of
my present day work is on fire and police equipment. It would
be nice just just get back into it for the pleasure as well.
Now, how about the rest of you?
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
Jamb85
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2014 1:49 am
Location: Port Pirie, South Australia, Australia
Motorcycle: GL1500A

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by Jamb85 » Fri Feb 06, 2015 7:27 am

Hi All,
I am also a licensed Ham (amateur radio operator, for at least 25 yrs following my dad) and have been looking at intergrating a rig into my gl 1500 or using a combination speaker mic remotely to a small low powered (rfi safety) chinese rig. Our repeaters here in Australia are wder spaced so would need all of the rigs two watts can give.
Congrats to all who have or intending to get their licenses and interested on how to complete the respective installs are done,
Cheers from Australia.
Mick VK5MIK

User avatar
5150Jim
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:52 pm
Location: Chico, CA
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500
1980 GL1100
1976 GL1000 (sold)

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by 5150Jim » Fri Feb 06, 2015 5:14 pm

I’ve been a ham since 1978 & still have a Baofeng UV-5R dual bander HT that goes everywhere with me to this day. I also have a Yaesu FT-757GX for HF & a group of guys that meet Mon –Fri on 40m every week. Just one little problem because something happen to the low band & I haven’t taken the time to look at it. But I do enjoy Ham radio & have for many yrs. In the 70s I worked many VHF & UHF rpts over the yrs. Also work HF phone patch to multiple U.S. Air Force Bases in Korea (U.S.A.F. MARS) for 2 yrs before moving to Riverside & joined the Riverside County Amateur Radio Association (2 years then moved to Vegas. I did volunteer communications for the Red Cross, Las Vegas, NV when they had a major flood & even saved a guy’s house from being flooded because of Ham radio. I was also very active in U.S. Air Force MARS (MILITARY AFFILIATE RADIO SYSTEM) 1979 – 1999 (HF & VHF radios). During that time I was Assistant State MARS Director (1 year) U.S.A.F. MARS Las Vegas, NV., Public Relations Liaison, Training Instructor, Radio operation and procedures for U.S.A.F. traffic handling network & Base Support Team, Nellis A.F.B. did radio installation and disaster communication & on more than one occasion I had to set up communications for a crash site just outside of Nellis A.F.B. because their radios wouldn’t cover but that was in the 80s. I also got into packet radio to handle traffic for some time. Now I enjoy EchoLink from time to time. Never put a radio on any of my bikes but I do have my HT with me all the time like I said in the beginning.
73s & congrats.
Jim
ka6aru

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Fri Feb 06, 2015 5:36 pm

5150Jim wrote: have a Baofeng UV-5R dual bander HT that goes everywhere with me to this day.


I also have the UV-5R dual band HT. I still love my old Motorola HT220's and the MT-500's, but as good as
they are they are not dual band. Furthermore, No other dual band radio can be had as economically as these
UV-5R, or others of the same type, but with a different name. I was fortunate enough to get mine with
all the accessories (software, Mic, headset, remote switch, case, magnetic antenna, stock rubber antenna,
and earphone) for a grand total of only $38.91 (US $) shipped in the door. Now, I have my own fire dept
radio with the VHF, and our UHF repeater frequencies with me all the time. Our department uses Kenwood
units; portable 6 channel, mobile and base units that cost top dollar, but do much less. As most of the
departments around here use the same frequency with only separate CTCSS, or DCS codes, I can have all
of them programmed in this unit for use when we are working mutual aid with other departments.
The 128 channels available is able to cover all departments in the tri-county area. That amounts to a lot
of departments.

Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
5150Jim
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:52 pm
Location: Chico, CA
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500
1980 GL1100
1976 GL1000 (sold)

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by 5150Jim » Sat Feb 07, 2015 12:56 pm

DJnRF wrote:
5150Jim wrote: have a Baofeng UV-5R dual bander HT that goes everywhere with me to this day.


I also have the UV-5R dual band HT. I still love my old Motorola HT220's and the MT-500's,
I remember the Motorola bricks... I worked in a small 2 way repair shop in Santa Fe Springs, CA about 20 yrs ago. I work at Michaels & I use my radio 1st thing in the mornings to get them to open the door before hrs.
Jim

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Sat Feb 07, 2015 3:31 pm

5150Jim wrote:
DJnRF wrote:
5150Jim wrote: have a Baofeng UV-5R dual bander HT that goes everywhere with me to this day.


I also have the UV-5R dual band HT. I still love my old Motorola HT220's and the MT-500's,
I remember the Motorola bricks... I worked in a small 2 way repair shop in Santa Fe Springs, CA about 20 yrs ago. I work at Michaels & I use my radio 1st thing in the mornings to get them to open the door before hrs.
Jim
The HT220, and the MT500 were nowhere as large as the older Ht's (I forget the number of the main two), and are still a very
common size for many of the portables today. I also have had much better luck with the old 15V batteries than those lower
voltage radios of today. I used to be able to run for three days without problem with the higher voltages. Now, the MX series
was large bodied. The short battery was not so great for more than a day, but the long version was ok. Just the weight and
size was a bit much.

In my business I was a dealer for GE, Wilson, Regency (which later became Relm [Regency Land Mobile], and Motorola. I
still love the old Micor system radios. One could have just about everything, frequency and a multitude of accessories.
They were also a dream to work on. When I first started my business the most common radio was the mobile Motorola
5V units. They were soon replaced with the 41V, and then the Twin V units. All tube types where most still used the old
vibrator powered supplies. GE started using the Tri-Eimac supplies for their hi-power unit outputs, and Motorola went
to the fully transistorized radios then.

I also remember having to work on many of the older 'Coffin' radios that used the dynamotor power supply. One could
watch all their lights dim, and sometimes the vehicle stall when one of those started up for transmitting. A real beefy
battery, and the old 100 or 130 amp Leese Neville alternators were a great improvement over the old generators for
the older hi-power units. Ahhhh! The good ole days. lol

Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
5150Jim
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:52 pm
Location: Chico, CA
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500
1980 GL1100
1976 GL1000 (sold)

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by 5150Jim » Mon Feb 09, 2015 9:23 pm

Yes! I had a Motorola Twin -V for Air Force MARS (VHF Rpt) in my van.
Great radio.

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Tue Feb 10, 2015 12:17 am

5150Jim wrote:Yes! I had a Motorola Twin -V for Air Force MARS (VHF Rpt) in my van.
Great radio.
Yes, they were great radios. I still have a couple here that I have worked with to
increase their power out. They work equal to, and sometimes better than some of
the new ones today that even have greater power output. I also love it that I can
have no more than a small control head and the speaker in the front while the
radio is cabled to the trunk. Completely out of the way. In vehicles of today the
dashboards are all plastic. That makes it touchy for some radios to even be
mounted onto them. One must have some type of console or floor mount for
them. The old control heads, even as complex as the Micor radios, are much
more suited for modern dashboards.

Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
HawkeyeGL1200
Posts: 918
Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2014 11:53 am
Location: Courtland, Va.
Motorcycle: 1984 GL1200 Interstate
1981 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by HawkeyeGL1200 » Tue Feb 10, 2015 6:04 pm

In the 1970's I was a CBer, with a 40 channel SSB radio, which I enjoyed immensely. Several folks who were in our local "group" (Upper 15 SSB) were also HAM operators. I always wanted to give HAM radio a try, but never did it... I've been away from CB radio for 40 years, I suppose, and the few times I've tried to get interested again, I've discovered there's a lot of trash out there.

As I read through this thread, one common theme seems to be "when the electrical grid goes down" I'll have my radio. Not to cause trouble.. I'm wondering what will power your HAM radio if there's no electricity? Do you have solar powered batteries that allow you to operate without an external power source?

Another question, or comment: The most likely cause of a prolonged loss of the electrical power grid is a low yield nuclear device detonated in the atmosphere somewhere over Ohio or near that area... with the resultant EMP taking down the grid. The damage to the infrastructure could easily cause a large scale power outage of MANY months to restore... think Zombie Apocalypse without the Zombies... there would be a LOT of people who would die from many causes... starvation, predation and from a fundamental breakdown in society. Will your HAM operate for 12 months without the grid?

Loss of the power grid is really scary stuff... best to learn how to eat, find water and protect what's yours too... I guess that's where the GUNS discussion would come in handy.
I am wrong as often as I am right concerning what is wrong with someone else' motorcycle without having seen the machine in person. Guessing with limited information, as to the source of the trouble, is sketchy at best.

chalfast
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 6:33 am
Location: Titusville,pa
Motorcycle: 1994 goldwing gl1500A Trike

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by chalfast » Fri Feb 27, 2015 10:23 am

I am an Amature Radio operator class Advanced ,been licensed sinceearly 1970`s .remarried 1997 moved never got active much after that .But you have me re interested .Thinking of 2meter on bike. KE3SM north west PA. ;)

User avatar
redbug
Posts: 525
Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 8:22 am
Location: Broken Arrow,Ok
Motorcycle: 1983 Gl1100I
1986 Harley FLHT

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by redbug » Fri Feb 27, 2015 2:30 pm

KG5FZR that's me now. Like the fzr. Went down to test on feb 14th and passed . Tried the general test ,but more gray matter must be activated and brain cells to offer memory. Now onward to the f-2 layer and pass the general test. Its getting fun now...
" Riding on Tulsa Time "

WB5RAG
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 9:08 pm
Location: Del City, Oklahoma
Motorcycle: Honda Goldwing 2012 GL1800

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by WB5RAG » Fri Feb 27, 2015 2:56 pm

Congratulations, enjoy. I have often thought of going to extra but my advanced does a lot and if they ever remove some of the advanced or make us go one way or the other i will consider upgrading to extra. Sure miss having to have the code requirements for the licenses though.

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Fri Feb 27, 2015 11:05 pm

HawkeyeGL1200 wrote:Loss of the power grid is really scary stuff... best to learn how to eat, find water and protect what's yours too... I guess that's where the GUNS discussion would come in handy.


I realize this is a good bit off topic here, but it fits well with your statement.

In case you haven't heard, it was released in the past few months that scientists
have found that the New Madrid earthquake fault is very highly likely to again
strike the Midwest within the next five years. It has been found to happen every
200+ years, and the last one was Dec. 16, 1811, at 2:15 AM. It was so strong,
as it has always been each time, that it rang church bells in Boston. It also
awakened the President in Washington. His team that was sent out to find out
what had happened searched out all the damaged areas of the country. They
found that the damage covered 600,000 Square miles.

Of course, in 1811 thee were a whole lot fewer people anywhere near, and around
the Southern tip of IL. The New Madrid fault is at the IL Southern tip. Should the
quake happen today the shock will be strong enough to topple the Sears Tower
(or whatever name it is called today) in Chicago. Also, do you know what runs
through New Madrid, Mo? All of the gas and oil pipelines that provide all of those
fuels for the entire Midwest, and East Coast. The kind of damage that will occur
will shut down all electricity, natural gas heating, and all the services that those
things supply. Due to the widespread damage thee will be no services available
to anyone. No grocery stores, no phones, no heat, no electricity, no banking
services, no gas stations, most roads damaged so badly as to be impassable.
In essence we all will be suddenly placed in the position of having to live as
our forefathers did in the 1700's.

I have studied this New Madrid problem for many years now. My 'siggie' on the
bottom of my posts should tell it all. The unfortunate problem is that statistics
show that 82 of every 100 people will die as they are not properly prepared
with the very few things needed to continue to live on in their life. The needed
knowledge in people today is just not there. Many go out and buy many things
that are suggested, but I have yet to find even one list of things that tells of
the seriousness of having to try this style of living for one or two years. That
is the minimum time for our Nation to recover enough to be able to regain
even a semblance of order, and organization. We have lost the knowledge,
and ability to live entirely without all of the 'luxury' we have acquired today.
How to build a fire with nothing. How to find and make water enough, and
safe enough to live for long. How to make our own clothes with very little.
How to build good enough temporary and permanent shelters to protect us
from the elements of nature (and the nature of man).

You think the loss of the power grid is scary? What about the total loss also
of all of our provided fuels? How about the loss of paved roads? How about
the loss of all stores for all the things we usually buy in our everyday lives?
How about the ability of calling for help? And how about the total lack of
any 'speedy' communications to anywhere, let alone for help? These are all
things we will lose with the average 7.9 to 8.3 quakes from the New Madrid
fault.

As most of us have done, what have we considered as our plans over the
next 10, 20, 30, 40, or more years of our lives? Do these things include
the needed additional knowledge to survive under such devastation as
the quake predicted?

Over the years I have lectured, wrote about, and even taught classes
in just this type of catastrophic situation. At the least, I have tried
to educate those people as to what to do; what to expect as highly
probable, and how to cope. Unfortunately, most people today just do
not accept this type of situation as ever happening to them.

You are right in the thought about 'guns'. However, most today have
the entirely wrong idea of what gun would be proper and best for such
a survival situation. Get the thought in mind that what is needed most
is NOT for combat; Not for aborigine survival, and merely for protection
from the elements of nature, the nature of man, and for food. Do your
best to consider your plans well. Avoid any 'combat' situation all you can.
Do not be a "Prepper" for all the stocks you can muster. Acquire the
knowledge enough so that you only have just what you can carry to
every place you may need to go, and gain what more you need along
the way, in any safe way you can.

Consider what I have said here very well. Plan for such an emergency
in the best way you can. You can even pick up much of the needed
knowledge from some Boy Scout, or adult Scouter near you.

Want some easy knowledge? Go to: http://lesstroud.ca/survivorman
Les Stroud has had the best survival education on TV. His seasons on
Discovery Ch. TV were not made just for entertainment of someone
doing spectacular things in places we would never go. He gives his show
the real life experience by doing it with no possible help if he screws
up, and can't get out of the situation himself. I have seen some of
his shows where had he not been able to 'straighten out' the problem,
he would have died. He even came close several times. AND, he
always tells the viewers where or how he goofed, or how he could
have avoided his problem. The show Bear puts on is just that; a
show. Man-Woman Wild is sometimes ok, as is Dual Survival, but
seldom show of more down to earth places for the average person.
His Survivorman series is the real education. His "About Survival",
and later are just added knowledge, but do not show the 'how to'
in survival.

Take care, and do give some good thought to all of this.
Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
redial
Posts: 2130
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 1:17 am
Location: Kapunda, SouthAustralia
Motorcycle: 1997 GL1500 Spectre Red Aspencade

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by redial » Sat Feb 28, 2015 12:09 am

And you choose to live in IL? That seems like living in the tiger's den waiting for it to come home for dinner, you! :o
Len in Kapunda

The world is not going to finish today, as it is already tomorrow in Australia and New Zealand, and other islands of foreign nations such as Guam and Samoa.

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:16 am

redial wrote:And you choose to live in IL? That seems like living in the tiger's den waiting for it to come home for dinner, you! :o
You were either not paying complete attention to my post,
or you just don't realize that state lines have nothing to do
with the shock effect of a major earthquake.

After researchers spent so many years looking into the severity,
time, and number of occurrences so evenly spaced over many
thousands of years, and also finding how the Mississippi river had
the course changed, ran backwards for several weeks, and even
caused the formation of a very large lake that had never been in
existence before that last quake (which is a very nice, large
sporting area today), plus the huge damage area of over 600,000
square miles, one would think that since Illinois is not that large
that it might just damage many surrounding states. Add all of this
to the fact that the entire Midwest and East Coast will not have
any electricity or heat for many months up to possibly several years,
and all the other effects and problems that will come with such
devastation, and one might just be able to understand that short
of another Chixulub asteroid impact not even a world war would
be as devastating.

There just is no way of escaping the effects of such an earthquake
in this country. By the way. With the power grid down Canada will
also have many of the same problems as the U. S. not to mention
the other physical effects to the land North of us. Actual damage to
the U. S. will cover most all of the Central U. S. The 56,000 square
mile area of Illinois is a far cry from the 600,000 square mile area
of damage the quake damage can effect.

The whole of South Africa is 471,000 square miles. It isn't quite
the size of the damage area caused by the 1811 earthquake.
Keep in mind that the damage effect will be even larger than land
damage due to the loss of many gas and oil service pipelines.
So, as a U. S. citizen living in the U. S. just where would you
suggest I move to here?
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

User avatar
Bob Myers
Posts: 64
Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2013 10:15 pm
Location: Richmond Ky
Motorcycle: 1995 GL1500 Aspencade

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by Bob Myers » Tue Mar 17, 2015 10:24 am

WB5RAG wrote:Congratulations, enjoy. I have often thought of going to extra but my advanced does a lot and if they ever remove some of the advanced or make us go one way or the other i will consider upgrading to extra. Sure miss having to have the code requirements for the licenses though.
As for a person who has always had a hearing problem, the dropping of the code was the catylist I had waited fro when I first got my ticket. Had the code remained mandatory I would still be wishing from the sidelines. I know several people with hearing problems who are now hams, and like me they cannot distinguish readily between dit-dah-dit to successfully operate CW
1995 GW Interstate w/Champion Escort sidecar, Dart trailer.
1993 GW Interstate-my commuter
1986 Yamaha Venture

WB5RAG
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 9:08 pm
Location: Del City, Oklahoma
Motorcycle: Honda Goldwing 2012 GL1800

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by WB5RAG » Tue Mar 17, 2015 11:36 am

There are all kinds of ways to interpret code and nowadays even code readers. before that even the hard of hearing used different kinds of devices to read/learn the code. My problem that i over came was tone where i have lost a good deal of upper frequency, i.e. 8k and above but adjust to a lower pitch and works great. to each their own however. i am glad i learned it, like a different language. Have fun -

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Tue Mar 17, 2015 2:08 pm

WB5RAG wrote:There are all kinds of ways to interpret code and nowadays even code readers. before that even the hard of hearing used different kinds of devices to read/learn the code. My problem that i over came was tone where i have lost a good deal of upper frequency, i.e. 8k and above but adjust to a lower pitch and works great. to each their own however. i am glad i learned it, like a different language. Have fun -

Due to gunfire my hearing loss begins at 2500 cps (Hz if your schooling is newer than mine).
Not even tone pitch helps me much as I still miss many of the characters. Back when I had
to pass the code my hearing was pretty good. I lost it later.

The great thing about my hearing loss is twofold. First is that I am able to hear the
subaudible tones that many don't even know exist. That is a great help in the alignment
of a radio when I don't have my spectrum analyzer handy as I can hear the difference in
frequency enough to keep it within the legal tolerance.

However, the most fun part of my hearing loss is this:
The voice ranges of women and children is usually between 3000 and 4500 cps. With
my loss beginning at 2500 needing a decibel level of at least 108 to hear and understand,
the doctor explained it to my wife this way; "Your husband is legally deaf to women and
kids."
Her response was: "How convenient!"

Isn't that just great?

Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

WB5RAG
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 9:08 pm
Location: Del City, Oklahoma
Motorcycle: Honda Goldwing 2012 GL1800

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by WB5RAG » Tue Mar 17, 2015 2:14 pm

yep, had similar comments - regarding the 'wife pitch' and heard the same comment "how conveinent"......ha

User avatar
DJnRF
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:50 pm
Location: FINALLY! Moved to a new home in Creve Coeur, IL.
Motorcycle: 1981 GL1100i Interstate
And, many others since I started riding. Started on a Harley in 1956.

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by DJnRF » Tue Mar 17, 2015 8:37 pm

WB5RAG wrote:yep, had similar comments - regarding the 'wife pitch' and heard the same comment "how conveinent"......ha
When I first started shooting as a sport, and to get as good as I could with
a rifle, we were never taught anything about vision and hearing protection.
Not even the military taught it when I did a lot of shooting.

Now that my hearing is shot, but have a real, and very good reason to not
hear women and kids ...... I shoot even more. lol

Dave.
"Survival is one's own ability to cope with and overcome any adverse or threatening situation, condition, casualty or event." ©Dj 1969

WB5RAG
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 9:08 pm
Location: Del City, Oklahoma
Motorcycle: Honda Goldwing 2012 GL1800

Re: Ham radio licensees?

Post by WB5RAG » Tue Mar 17, 2015 9:55 pm

agree but i bet military doesn't use protection now - i don't know - i certainly do and i just recently purchased the electronic earmufs and do like them. i reload too so shooting is not as expensive as it could be but if that idiot keeps doing his stuff in DC, it may cost to just look at lead.



Post Reply