Darkside, Rear CT Mounting Question


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
  • Sponsored Links
Post Reply
User avatar
JoeHall
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:13 pm
Location: Radcliff, KY
Motorcycle: 2008 GL1800

Darkside, Rear CT Mounting Question

Post by JoeHall » Sat Jun 30, 2018 1:31 pm



I plan to go darkside on the rear of the 2008 GL1800 when the rear tire wears a bit more. I have a Harbor Freight auto & motorcycle changer, bought several years ago, and it works as it was designed to.

My question: Is it really possible to use the manually operated HF tire changer to mount the run-flat CT on the GL1800 rim? I ask, because the run flat tires have very stiff sidewalls, and would likely be a workout even for a pneumatic changer at a tire shop. Has anyone here ever personally installed a 195/55/16 run flat CT on a GL1800 rim with a HF tire changer?

If so, how difficult was the job? Any particular tricks to getting the tire onto the rim? Airing it up? "Popping" the tire out on the rim?

Thanks,
Joe H



User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 19413
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Darkside, Rear CT Mounting Question

Post by WingAdmin » Sat Jun 30, 2018 1:41 pm

Have a look at A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims. I just used this method to mount an Austone Taxi Tire (which has notoriously stiff 6-ply steel-belted sidewalls) using only tire irons and no pneumatics, and it worked amazingly well. There were no issues seating the bead or anything else, it just worked like any other tire.

User avatar
JoeHall
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:13 pm
Location: Radcliff, KY
Motorcycle: 2008 GL1800

Re: Darkside, Rear CT Mounting Question

Post by JoeHall » Sat Jun 30, 2018 3:15 pm

Thanks Wingadmin,
I had stumbled onto the thread you mention, after posting here. Was wondering if it may work with the CT. Sounds like you have recently been there-done that, so I am now confident enough to give it a try also. I am chomping at the bit to go to darkside with this bike. But the cheapskate in me will not allow it till the current, nearly new E4 is worn down. At the rate I am going, 3000 miles since I bought the bike three weeks ago, it should not take long.

Meanwhile, I am doing my homework and shopping for the parts, i.e. spare wheel, steel T-valve stems, and a new CT once I make a final choice as to brand. It is definitely gonna be a run flat, 195/55, but not certain which brand yet.

Thanks Again,
Joe H

User avatar
AZgl1800
Posts: 1193
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:46 pm
Location: Lake Oologah Indian Territory USA
Motorcycle: '02 GL1800

Re: Darkside, Rear CT Mounting Question

Post by AZgl1800 » Sat Jun 30, 2018 11:23 pm

when I did that with a Michelin RF ZP tire,

I went to a friends house, and we mounted it up with a hammer, two tire irons, and a heavy screwdriver to keep the sidewall from slipping back off the rim.

a tire machine would have been nice, but we got it done in about 15 minutes.

the 1800 sure is nice for rear tire changes, lay down a blanket, lay it over on the right side.

break the bolts and lift the wheel out.

I used my wrist for setting the torque going back on. :D
~John

User avatar
ekvh
Posts: 323
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2010 9:52 am
Location: Grand Forks, ND
Motorcycle: 1977 gl1000

Re: Darkside, Rear CT Mounting Question

Post by ekvh » Sun Jul 01, 2018 8:14 am

I did it yesterday with a 1500 rim. Actually I spent a good five hours Friday with no luck. Not enough arms, legs, and chins to operate all the levers. I used ratchet straps to compress the stuff sidewalls, but no way could I get it on there. I just did it on the piece of plywood on the floor.

Yesterday, I had a six to nine volt idea flow through my head. (I bypassed the relay to the frontal cortex.) I used the ratchet straps looped around the tire and back up through one of the opposite side rim spokes. I put the strap on loosely so I could put 195lbs of knee weight on it and pry about 90 degrees under the rim, then ratcheted the strap tight to hold that section. The sidewalls are very stiff. I then moved 90 degrees to one side and did the same. Then 90 degrees to the other side and did the same. The last bit was tough and I confess to marring the living crap out of my rim from the first attempts. Here’s a pic of it done. If you look closely you’ll see how the straps are looped.


Getting it to seat wasn’t easy. Both sides fought 60 psi and repeated blows with a hammer. I finally got it to seat by breaking the bead again all the way around, rapping it with a 3lb hammer in a circular motion to get it uniformly spaces to start and then applying lube and at least 60psi to get it to pop. I couldn’t find tire lube in a smaller size and couldn’t see paying $20 for a gallon of lube, so after reading a bit it seems vegetable oils are safest. I tried canola oil but it wasn’t slippery at all on the rubber, so I used coconut oil and it worked great. And smelled great!!

This is going into a 1200 swingarm into a 77. It fits with a 1/4” on the right and 3/8” on the left. I did modify the swingarm on the sides a bit and reinforced top and bottoms.




It is what it is.

User avatar
JoeHall
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:13 pm
Location: Radcliff, KY
Motorcycle: 2008 GL1800

Re: Darkside, Rear CT Mounting Question

Post by JoeHall » Mon Jul 02, 2018 1:07 pm

Reading the above, it looks like WingAdmin and ekvh had two totally different experiences. I do not see myself wrestling with the job, as ekvh had to, but since I do have a HF tire changer, maybe the job would go easier. On the one hand, I'd prefer to order the tire on-line, then use the HF changer to do the job myself. On the other hand, if it turned out to be impossible for me, then I'd be stuck with everything, and considerable $ invested. I am guessing, at that point, it would be very difficult to find a tire store to mount my tire on my rim. They'd rather sell me their tire, at their price, and then mount it for me.

I'd feel safer, and probably have better luck with taking a, "trailer wheel" to a tire store, buying their tire. and having them mount and balance it. Although that would be more expensive, I am sure.



Post Reply