What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?


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What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by mberk01 »



Some years back we were headed north through Wyoming on the way to Alaska. We experienced crosswind gusts that I would estimate at 45-50 MPH. It was a dangerous situation as we could not stay in our lane. We stopped on the shoulder and my buddy lost his balance, dropping his Wing twice. I was afraid to get off my bike to help him as I was certain my bike would blow over if left unattended on the side stand. Some guys in a pickup stopped and helped him pick up his bike - twice. Fortunately we were near an intersection. Our solution for the day was to head west, straight into the wind. It took a lot of throttle to maintain cruising speed but the ride behind the big fairing was relatively calm.



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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by WingAdmin »

I can think of a couple.

Riding up from Florida (Kissimmee) to Cleveland. My original plan was to ride back over two days, after having done the 21 hour trip down nonstop a few days earlier. However the weather (thunderstorms along most of the route) had me delay my return, hoping the weather would improve - it didn't.

So Sunday came along, I had to be at home for work on Monday, so at 5:00 am I set off hoping to beat some storms showing on the radar. They caught up with me about 15 minutes in, and I quickly stopped and pulled on the rain gear. I had that rain gear on for the rest of that 20 hour ride.

I ended up riding up through extremely flat Florida on I-95, in complete darkness, absolute pouring rain, with lightning flashing all around me. Visibility was so poor due to the horrendous amount of rain coming down, I couldn't see the lines on the road - I kept a tractor trailer about 1000 feet in front of me and followed his taillights, because that's about all I could see. I also stayed in his tire tracks, as his big wide tires were pushing a lot of the water out of the lane we were both using. I spent about an hour and a half doing this, hoping not to be hit by lightning, before the rain let up somewhat.

The other time was part of my trip to North Carolina and back to get my trailer that I wrote about riding through West Virginia mountains here:
At about 2:30, I entered the Canaan Valley and started up the mountain, the windy road I had been so looking forward to. However, I noticed some menacing looking black clouds high up the mountain side, and hoped I was going to be able to circumvent them. No such luck. As I started up the side of the mountain, it started pouring rain. I stayed reasonably dry as long as I kept moving, although I noticed virtually every other motorcycle (Harleys, of course) cowering under gas station shelters or under trees, lest their precious bikes see a drop of rain. :) The rain started getting more intense, and it started with lightning and thunder as well. Out of nowhere, the rain became a deluge, heavier than I had ever ridden in. Of course, just as this rain started, I hit the most challenging part of the route, covered in 180-degree switchbacks as the road zig-zagged up the mountain side. I figured the rain couldn't last at that intensity for very long...and I was right: it got worse. Several times I thought; "it can't get worse than this" - and then it did. My forward visibility was steadily decreasing, and I was seriously thinking about pulling over. However, I knew that the weather was moving northwest, and pulling over only meant it would move past me, and I'd then have to ride through it again. Not only that - there was nowhere for me to pull over. I had a rock face on one side, and guardrail on the other. With the trailer behind me, there was no room for me to just pull over, without the danger of being hit from behind. Several times I came upon small enclaves on the side of the road for you to pull into, but the visibility was so bad, I couldn't see these until I was right upon them, and by then there was no way I could turn into them. I figured as long as I could make out the yellow center line through my windshield, I could make it through. I tried standing up on my footpegs and just taking the brunt of the water on my helmet faceshield, but I could see even less that way. I got to the top of the mountain, running in second gear, about 20 mph, with my hazard lights going. At this point the rain was so heavy that I had absolutely zero forward visibility, and the lightning was flashing almost constantly. I was using my GPS to determine when I was about to come upon a curve or another switchback, and I was looking down and to the left, watching the yellow center line on the road next to me to ensure I was staying in my lane. I was just hoping I didn't come up on another car or other obstruction, because I wouldn't be able to see it.

There was SO much water coming out of the sky, I didn't know it was possible for this volume of rain to come down - it felt like there was more water than air. I was absolutely soaked through by this point. This was extremely tough to do, tremendous stress - like flying an airplane on instruments through a storm, but ten times harder - and with only one instrument (my GPS). I was now descending the far side of the mountain, going through switchback after switchback. While looking forward, I came up on a slight curve that my GPS didn't depict, and felt the right trailer wheel go off the road. I looked to the left to see the center line and in horror saw that I was far right in my lane, and about to go into the rock wall. I swerved gently left (no sudden moves, there was SO much water on the ground) back into my lane. At this point I thought, "I have reached the limit of my riding abilities; this is not going to end well." I couldn't stop, I couldn't keep going. Well, I had to keep going, it was my only option. Another 30 seconds of this hell, and I noticed a light in the sky in front of me - the clouds were starting to clear. Almost instantly, the rain started to let up. 60 seconds later, the rain had stopped entirely, and two minutes later I was in bright sunshine again - sopping wet. 25 years of riding motorcycles, and this was without a question the most difficult, most challenging thing I have ever done on two wheels. I'd prefer to never have to do it again!

The temperature had dropped to 64 degrees at the height of the storm. Within five minutes after exiting the rain, it was back to 92 again. Crazy! I spent the next hour and a half riding with arms and legs extended out into the wind, drying out. In the 92 degree heat, it actually felt nice to be wet.

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by C-dub »

For me it was back in 1985 on my GS1100E. No heated anything and no fairing or windscreen at all.

I was 19 years old and had ridden this route from Dallas-San Diego when it was much warmer in mid May when I was heading to my duty station at NAS Miramar from school in Memphis after a two week leave stopover to see the family. I was going to ride home and fly back and leave my bike there while I went on my first WestPac cruise. It was January 30 I think. I was so anxious I couldn't sleep so I just packed up and left the base about 0300. Everything was fine until I got past El Paso and switched from I-10 to I-20. I was wearing a snowmobile suit, some very stiff winter motorcycle gloves with a big gauntlet, my flight deck boots with wool socks, and two or three layers of some combination of thermal underwear and sweatshirts. I don't remember if I had something else for my head and face other than just my full-face helmet. No electric battery powered anything gear.

I reached the switch from I-10 to I-20 around 2200-2230 and IIRC, the temperature on I-10 must have been at least around 40F, but when I came out the other side of that little valley onto I-20 it must have dropped closer to 20F. I was already stopping every 30 minutes or so to get off the bike, remove my gloves, and hold my hands near my muffler pipes exhaust to thaw out my hands a bit. I only last another 20 miles or so and stopped in Pecos about 2300. I had to wait inside around 20-30 minutes for my hands to warm up enough to be able to hold the pen to sign for the room.

I woke up after around 7-8 hours of sleep and prepared to get back on the road after some breakfast. I made it another 30-40 miles. It started snowing and I thought, okay cool, then it started sticking to the road. Stopped at a hotel in Midland that had a cafe to try and wait it out and hope it warmed up above freezing. The news weather report did not look promising. I was stuck about 350 miles from home and the hotel had not vacant rooms. Thanks to another veteran, who know owned and operated that hotel, he let me stay in a room being renovated for free that night. I was able to get a hold of my dad and he and my brother loaded up the Ford van we had back then and came out to get me. They had a set of studded snow tires from when they had moved down from upstate NY a year before and changed to put those on before leaving Dallas. We all stayed in the room together, then loaded the bike into the van the next morning, left the hotel guy some money for the room, and headed home.

I don't mind riding in the rain and have been soaked many times when caught without rain gear or after huge failure of rain gear. Being really really cold with no way to avoid it stinks bad.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by tamathumper »

I thought Day 3 of my Prefrontal Tour last year was the worst,... until I got to Day 6!

Day 3:
--------
May 24, 2019
There, on the right. A brilliant arc of white violence flashed to the ground. And on the left, another leapt into being. Above in the gloom, muted flashes betrayed the presence of others, kept aloft.

We sped westward from Williamsburg toward Des Moines, betting on catching a narrow break in the storm front where the rains would be heavy, but hopefully not biblical. The rain fell harder, mixing with road spray and making the air a veritable sauce.

More lightning, and raining harder still. Jack in the lead, probably thinking nothing of it, and me as the rear guard, calculating the risk of abandoning Faraday at such a critical juncture, and building a small **** with newly laid bricks - but enjoying the hell out of it at the same time.

The animals fell just short of pairing up, but cars and trucks were vying for position on the edge of the highway, hazards flashing, victims of their own windshields and futile wipers.

We pressed on and broke free in about an hour, and I smiled at the warmth of the sun - my gloves failed the waterproof test miserably, and I was sitting in a puddle of water a half inch deep. But it still beats a day at the office.

The lakes of Des Moines are beautiful this time of year, until you realize they're supposed to be crops. Flat lands make for poor drainage, and few if any of the fields are planted - torrents of muddy water abound. Veggies will be 'spensive this year.

Nebraska was a blur of, well, Nebraska, and we broke off I-80 at Kearney and ran through Kansas on 383, a pleasure cruise of long sweeping curves, little to no traffic, light winds, and a beautiful blue sky. Crop dusters were circling and swooping like birds of prey throughout the state, and we managed to avoid all but one overspray.

Kansas has become a corn state like the rest - all the better to make ethanol. Dairy cows and feed lots made up the majority of the "wild life", save for one small herd of mule deer at the roadside. Also conspicuously missing, yet not missed? The delays of Subarus...

We've come to light in Colby, Kansas, a map dot crossroads with a community college specializing in agriculture. Population - 3,000 corn-fed souls. Colorado is a short drive away, and the weather looks good. The 2019 Prefrontal Tour is on.

Onward and upward!

Day 6:
--------
May 27, 2019
It was at that exact moment, at about 10:00 AM on the morning of Day 6 of the 2019 Prefrontal Tour that the universe decided to send me a message. I licked a stamp and RSVP'ed "Loud and clear. Over and out.", then pulled to the side to let a tailing truck go past and turned to descend back below the snow line...

We left Ouray early, to multiple "Special Weather Statements" and "Winter Storm Warnings" above 9,000 feet, not that you could tell from the beautiful sunrise reflecting off the cliffs above. Destination - Silverton, then Durango, and ultimately Cortez. But we'd need to make it through Red Mountain, Molas and Coal Bank Passes first, all near or above 11,000 feet.

We hit the first switchbacks literally at the end of Main Street and climbed quickly above the town, all matchbox houses and early morning shadows. It was 34 degrees with driving snow and we had a lot of climbing to do if we were going to make it over the first pass. Susan would have loved the ride - a cliff on the left and a sheer precipice on the right with nothing but the white painted line to keep you from falling a few hundred feet.

The temperature kept dropping as we wound our way up the S-curves, some posted at a glorious 10 miles per hour, and I cranked the heated grips from STUN to KILL. It started to snow even more heavily halfway up the eastern slope, and the temperature dropped to 25 degrees. By the time we got to the top the road was a slushy combination of melting snow and that red cat litter they use on the roads in Colorado, coming up through the tunnels and collecting on the controls. Snow plows went past in the opposite direction with the blades down, and I began to question my better judgment.

We made it through and down, passing dozens of avalanches, their broken trees lining the chutes and still pointing downslope to the pile of concreted snow and jumbled trunks at their bottoms, at one point driving right beneath one - through a tunnel that was built in what is probably an annual avalanche zone. I was never so happy to see the temperature return to 30 degrees as we pulled into Silverton for coffee with two more passes to traverse on the way to Durango.

We departed after about an hour, snow still falling heavily and by now coating the bikes and making the roads a wet mess. As we climbed the face of Molas Pass the temperature dropped again and the snow fell so hard it was impossible to see the surrounding mountains - it was us and the road. It began to collect on the evergreens, and then along the roadsides, tenuous fingers reaching into the lanes.

At one magical point there was a line across the road and the pavement beyond was white. Goldwings aren't known as snow machines, and Dunlop Elite 4's are basically heavy slicks with very few sipes or features to divert water and snow. I thought I felt a wiggle or two as the snow continued to pile and then I received the message like a bolt out of the blue. Going upslope and around a corner the rear end gave a wiggle that was undeniable, and I made the necessary reverse maneuver, slowly descending in the slush to the first turnout to wait for Jack.

We collected ourselves at the Visitor's Center back in Silverton, where the attendant assured us it would be snowing for six more years and we would do best to consider buying a house. The ambulance went howling out of town, retracing our route from earlier, on the report of a car having slid off the road in the pass we'd just summited.

She was right for about the next hour and a half, when magically at 11:30 the clouds parted and several inches of snow melted in minutes. But that was in town - what would it look like back up in the passes?

Not to be deterred we had invoked a backup plan, and a tow truck arrived from Durango shortly after noon. He assured us the roads were now clear and we tipped and thanked him and mounted back up. The temps were low, it was still snowing in places, but true to his word the roads were only wet and we arrived in Durango unscathed, all steep descent and fantastic views, eyes wide and ears popping, passing more plows, snowmobiles, and more than a few other motorcycles.

We're tucked into Cortez and looking forward to an adult beverage before getting back at it tomorrow, in search of some warm fricken' weather already!

Onward and upward!

Prefrontal Tour posts available at 2019PrefrontalTour.blogspot.com and 2018PrefrontalTour.blogspot.com. Will there even BE a 2020PrefrontalTour?!
'03 GL1800A

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by DenverWinger »

Nothing quite as dramatic as the stories above, but this one is very "Colorado".

The Colorado front range is well known for "Chinook" winds racing down the mountains into the valleys.

Probably 1989 or so I was riding my Suzuki GS-550 from Denver into Boulder to watch some event going on there, this particular day the Chinooks were out in force! Fortunately the wind direction was head-on as driving down the Denver-Boulder turnpike. Cross-winds would have been real scary.

For those not familiar with the turnpike, it crests at about 5700' altitude at Davidson Mesa which overlooks the city of Boulder about 400' lower in altitude below, a pretty sight all lit up at night from the overlook. The turnpike drops this 400' in altitude over just a few miles, really a pretty decent down-grade drive.

The Suzuki had one of those handle-bar mounted windshields, a nice good sized one but no fairing. I started this down grade into Boulder and got hit by this horrendous blast of steady wind roaring out of Boulder Valley. This headwind was so strong I had to downshift the six-speed Suzuki (actually a pretty zippy bike!) all the way back to second gear and wide-open throttle just to hold 40MPH going DOWNHILL! About halfway down the windshield decided it had had enough and snapped down the middle in two pieces! Thank goodness for helmets, it hit me in the head. Now I had to pull over, fighting the wind and try to remove my destroyed windshield.

I finally got the remnants of it off the handlbars and continued on my way into Boulder. The winds were nowhere near as severe in town and as the day progressed diminished completely.

But I never thought I'd see the day I had to use wide-open throttle in low gear to go Downhill!
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♪ 99 Bugs in the Code. ♫ :(
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♫ 127 Little Bugs in the Code. ♫ ♪ :shock:

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by C-dub »

DenverWinger wrote:
Sun May 03, 2020 7:24 pm
Nothing quite as dramatic as the stories above, but this one is very "Colorado".

About halfway down the windshield decided it had had enough and snapped down the middle in two pieces! Thank goodness for helmets, it hit me in the head. Now I had to pull over, fighting the wind and try to remove my destroyed windshield.
IDK, getting whacked in the the head with your own windscreen is pretty dramatic. I haven't had to deal with parts breaking off and hitting me in the head. A rock or two that I was unable to avoid despite seeing it coming, but not any of my own parts.
I am not and have never been a LEO. My avatar is in honor of my friend, Dallas Police Sargent Michael Smith, who was murdered along with four other officers in Dallas on 7.7.2016.

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by mberk01 »

Whittier, Alaska - 2007. Driving from Anchorage to the town of Whittier, you must pass through the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel. The tunnel is 2.5 miles long and is the longest highway tunnel in North America. The tunnel is one lane and is shared by trains and cars/motorcycles. Traffic is carefully controlled on both ends of the tunnel. At the appropriate time, motorcycles lead the pack with cars behind. Vehicle speed through the tunnel is monitored and controlled by electronic overhead signs. You must maintain 25 MPH for approximately 6 minutes. Not really that hard to do, unless you get flustered and start worrying about what could happen. You are driving down the center of railroad tracks. No railroad ties, just tracks. Wander into the tracks and you'll likely crash. Halfway through the tunnel we see the brilliant white light of what looks like the headlight of an on-coming train! It's unmistakable. Surely to God they didn't release a train headed our way while we are still in the tunnel. Pucker meter pegged in red zone. "So this is how it ends. Head-on with a train. OK God, if this is my destiny, at least I'm doing something I enjoy." The light is getting closer, and brighter. I brace for impact. Suddenly we are out of the tunnel. The train is parked just beyond the exit, with its headlight on! Live to ride another day.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by WingAdmin »

C-dub wrote:
Sun May 03, 2020 3:00 pm
I was already stopping every 30 minutes or so to get off the bike, remove my gloves, and hold my hands near my muffler pipes exhaust to thaw out my hands a bit.
That brings up memories of riding my old air-cooled GSX-R750 in frigid weather. I would take one (gloved) hand and shove it down into the engine to thaw my fingers. Once I could feel them again, I'd then switch hands shove the other one down in there. Got pretty good at riding while working the throttle with my left hand. :)

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Viking »

Bunch of years back, in April, I was headed to Alberta from Ontario. First day out, I hit rain/sleet/snow which lasted all day. I took Highway 2 south of Lake Superior, crossing into Michigan at Sault Ste Marie, and finally stopped in Munising for the night. I got my gear mostly all dried out by morning and headed out again. It was cold all that second day, and I did not have anywhere near enough gear to keep me warm, but I soldiered on, stopping in a city campground for this overnight. I was about hypothermal, but a good sleeping bag warmed me up enough to get some sleep. If I remember right, this was in St Cloud MN. Day three started frosty, but by 10AM it had warmed up to over a hundred degrees with a 70 plus mph wind blowing from the south. I rode across North Dakota leaned into that wind at about a 45 degree angle, with the vision of tractor trailers in front of me leaned 45 degrees to the north, so I was looking at them sideways. Did I mention it got up over a hundred degrees, after two days of cold, and cold rain/sleet/snow? I stopped overnight in a hotel in a tiny town in Montana, baked, dehydrated and exhausted. The next day dawned cool and sunny, and the remainder of the trip reminded me why I ride a motorcycle as I got several weeks of absolutely perfect weather. That was, however, the worst three day stretch I ever spent on two wheels.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by tamathumper »

I've come across Nebraska in that wind, riding the other direction, but still canted to the south. The highway was closed to large vehicles due to the tipover risk.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by AZgl1800 »

Nothing fancy with my worst trip...
As many of you know, I was merged into a Median Wall by a Semi back in 2008.
the result of that was due to damage to my body's Thermostat, I can no longer handle temps over 85*F

I was trying to get home from Atlanta, Ga to Oologah, Oklahoma.
Starting out from Atlanta, it was drizzle and cloudy half of the day, 2nd half it was clear skies and 95% humidity and the sun felt like a melting pot.... about 2 pm, I found a hotel and stayed overnight.

next day, left at sunup, clear skies and fairly good riding until Memphis, TN.
a repeat of the previous evening, had to find a hotel and quit at 3 pm

From Memphis going west, the temps started hovering in the 100+ range and 90% humidity levels....
I would ride 2 hours and find a hotel, take a shower, try to sleep, and go again at dark.
Even with HID lights, it was miserable, Tulsa Tall windshield did not let me have enough air, somewhere around midnight, I found a rest area, and stopped, had to get some rest and sleep...

the rest of the way home, was in 2 hour runs, horrible heat and a hotel and Air Conditioning...
that was my last trip ever on a bike by myself, or for long distances.

Now, I drive my Suburban and tow the bike to the next destination.

I now have a Madstad windscreen, and can adjust it to conditions.
All the way down and tilted back, lots of wind on my chest and face...

Up all the way and tilted vertical, no wind on me at all, but I can see over the top of the windscreen, so no rain or bugs splattered in front of my eyes.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Viking »

Yeah, I hear ya tamathumper. North Dakota closes the east west highways from Fargo to Bismark when the winds reach 75 MPH continuous or 100 MPH gusting, I believe. I had never seen wind like that, and I grew up in the Canadian Provinces just north of there. We used to get wind storms east west tho that would blow all the dirt in Saskatchewan into Manitoba. It would bank up against buildings and get up to four or more feet deep like snow drifts, but dirt. Cattle would bunch at fencelines and get buried under dirt. Horses were smarter and would turn butt to the wind. We used to have to ride the fencelines after dust storms to get cows on their feet, or they died there. Oh the joys of farming/ranching.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by DenverWinger »

The wind blew like crazy all day Yesterday, We won't have any songbirds for the next week or so until they finally fly back from Kansas! The birds that got blown here from Utah are already on their way back home!
♫ 99 Little Bugs in the Code, ♪
♪ 99 Bugs in the Code. ♫ :(
♫ Take one down, Patch it around, ♪
♫ 127 Little Bugs in the Code. ♫ ♪ :shock:

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Xfyrfiter »

West Texas headed east, cramped out on the prairie we went to sleep under the stars, just a bit cool maybe 45°f , woke up the next a.m. with 4 or 5 inches of snow on our sleeping bags. Got up built a small fire for coffee, packed up our gear and set off, we rode the next 100 miles or so on snow and ice. Two old Harleys, a 62 pan chopped and a 47 flathead stock. Needless to say they are not snowmobiles. This was 1970 too young and dumb to turn around and go home. It rained or snowed 28 of the next 31 days on the bikes. Never again.

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by virgilmobile »

Just picked up my Gl1000 for the ride home in March.Halfway there on a seldom driven road was a swath of hail a foot deep and half mile wide.
Waited for 2 hours till a truck plowed a path.

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Ed Brock »

I-5 North bound from Salem headed to work in Portland. Temp was about 20 degrees. Anytime you got to 51mph the bike would start wondering in it's lane. Slow to 50mph and the bike would go straight. What I did not know at the time, but found out when I got to work was the freeway was closed due to ice. That explained the no traffic situation.
Or, maybe it was hitting a huge bee swarm at 50mph. Bug juice aplenty.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by ni0k »

I was riding a GS750 home after day's work... about 35 miles. I was tired and eager to get home and was trying to beat the thunderstorm. Well I didn't. The cloud to ground lightning was all around me. I could see bolts of lightning hitting the ground very close. The area was very rural, there were no bridges or overpasses to cover under, no garages or buildings to hide in, so I pressed home. My instincts had me ride with my head ducked down close to the tank. My imagination had pictures of me being struck by lightning. But I made it home OK.

Hodgy
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Hodgy »

.

I have riden in snow before but one day it was way to deep and had to put the plow on the wing.
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by wing rider 2012 »

The worst for me happened a number of years ago, I was riding a Honda Shadow, no windshield and my helmet had no visor, just wearing sunglasses, I rode into a swarm of bees, needless to say I had bees in my helmet and my jacket and they were having a great time and I wasn't.
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larrycole
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by larrycole »

I once got caught in the open in Montana on my 1976 GL1000 when it started hailing. No fairing, just a windshield, so I was very glad I was wearing a full face helmet and armored jacket.

A scarier hail incident occurred when I was returning to Denver from South Dakota. I stopped for gas in Cheyenne and could see dark clouds to the south and heavy virga. When it looked to be clearing, I headed south again, only to run into the aftermath of a severe hail storm a couple miles from Cheyenne. The sun was out by now, but there was a good 8" of hail on the interstate and no way to pull off without crashing. Fortunately, traffic was light and other vehicles had created two troughs of mostly clear roadway. My "lane" was perhaps 10" wide as I drove very carefully and very straight for the two miles it took before the highway was clear again.

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wezx
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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by wezx »

My first year in College I was flat broke and my car died. I had bought a 1965 Honda CB160 (a whopping 161 CC’s! LOL) from a friend and having no other choice rode it clear through December in the snow so I could get to work and school. Riding any 2 wheeled vehicle in a foot of snow is no fun...AT ALL! LOL

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Ed Brock »

hodgy,
I have ridden in snow before, like many I'm sure. My snow riding was just for fun and to see if I could. My trusty Cavalcade did a great job of getting me to work. I did that for 5 days. Uphill's, downhill's, corner's, traffic lights, you know all the fun stuff. It was interesting, I got what I called the "what the heck is he doing on a motorcycle in the snow" look. It was fun also, I have a sick mind, so I had fun.
However, there always seems to be one of those, 1/2 a block from home after riding about 15 miles in 4-5 inch's of snow, as I was slowing edging the bike to the curb so I could put my right foot on the curb and guide the bike around the turn. Good plan I thought. Well, that did not go as planed. The bike started to lean/slid to the left, my foot was right side curb and I keep having to do a greater split. Soon I ran out of split mobility and the bike very gently touched the ground. Well now, I thought, I'll just pick it up. Problem, NO traction. Then I thought, I'll just walk the 1/2 block, go home and drop off my helmet and get the neighbor to help. Another problem developed, wife saw me walking home. She was in garage waiting for me. She wanted to know where the bike was. I VERY quickly said "oh, around the corner, I'll be right back. I got the neighbor, we picked the bike up, no problem, started her, finished the ride home. Again problem, wife was waiting in garage, still! Her hand was held out, her foot was tapping and she demanded my keys stating I was no longer allowed to ride the bike in the snow any more. BUMMER!
Ed

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Ed Brock »

Should have entered contest, then posted.
Ed

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by WingAdmin »

Ed Brock wrote:
Tue Jun 02, 2020 12:00 pm
Should have entered contest, then posted.
Ed
No worry! You get credit for every message posted during the calendar month, even those BEFORE you entered the contest that month! :) If you enter the contest on the last day of the month, you get all the entries for everything you posted that month!

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Re: What Were The Worst Riding Conditions You Ever Experienced?

Post by Plumber8939 »

I started riding a bike in 83 I think. A Honda 450 nighthawk. Rode that for about two years and then felt I needed something bigger so I sold that and planned on getting a 750 but nothing ever happened except I became very interested in a goldwing. Fast forward to 2014 I told the wife I was interested in checking out a goldwing. Thinking we could go on some rides together. Little did I know the first part of April I was riding a bike she bought , a 750 magna, home for her. We met in 2009and she never had a drivers license, I taught her to drive in 2010 and now in 2014 she has her own bike. A couple of weeks after riding hers home I found my second bike , my 1996 1500 se goldwing
Now we are mid to 3rd week of April and I'm like learning to ride again but with a tank not having much riding for the last 30 years but basic things never left me. I was working up in Fort Mcmurray Alberta about a 5 1/2 hour drive each way. 14 days in 7 days off, and I said when the temps got to double digits during the day and above freezing at night I would take the bike and being up there for 14 days it's got to get better. May 5 2014 was last day of shift and we heard some weather was coming in and wanted to leave at noon, never happened but we were able to leave at 3:00. It was almost an hour before I left so handy 4:00 and almost 1 1/2 hour into ride I had to wipe snow off windshield a few times but not that bad then I had to stop again to wipe off the snow and the wind picked up and snow came so hard I couldn't see and a couple inches on road in no time, luckily I stopped at an on ramp to a rest stop and went up there. Wet slushy snow and trucks were having a good solid spray coming off them a good 4 feet into the air. At the rest area when I pulled up to the washroom area I dumped the bike as my footing with riding boots on had no traction My riding boots then was like a cowboy boot with a smooth soul and now I had to right this bike. Took a few attempts but got it. Only broke off 1 highway peg.
I called the wife and said come get me the bike is staying parked. She had about a 3 hour drive to me but in about two hours the storm passed and not long after that the road started to clear some spray was down to a foot and traffic had pavement showing again so I babied that bike for almost an hour and was totally out of the snow and that's where the wife met me and also had insulated coveralls and warm gloves and I got the bike home that night
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