I'm a newbie on motorcycles and Gl1000 is my first bike


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wgatesh
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2020 10:05 am
Location: México
Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000

I'm a newbie on motorcycles and Gl1000 is my first bike

Post by wgatesh »



Hello Friends. I'm new to the world of motorcycles and newer to this forum.

It was a dream I had for long, and it came true. I purchased a 76 wing, which I'm fixing right now. Once its done I'll learn to ride.

I'm here asking for advice on driving and taking care of this old' and precious bikes, personally these are the one I like the most.

Thanks!


Solo So Long
Posts: 237
Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2020 4:07 pm
Location: Northern Nevada
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500
1983 GW Interstate (ready to repair)
A pack of Super Cubs
Formerly (in order):
Honda Super Cub (bought 1968, sold ?)
Kawasaki Coyote (early 1970s)
Honda 350 (mid 1970s)
Kawasaki KZ900-PS (1977)
Honda Super Cubs (various years)
Kawasaki KZ1000C (1978)
Kawasaki KZ1000P (various years, 1980 - 2005)
Honda 360 (1983)
BMW R1150RT-P (2001)
BMW R1200RT-P (various years 2007 - 2018, NEVER AGAIN)

Re: I'm a newbie on motorcycles and Gl1000 is my first bike

Post by Solo So Long »

First, DO NOT attempt to learn to ride on a Goldwing.

Second, REALLY do not attempt to learn to ride on a Goldwing.

I got my first motorcycle in 1968, when I was just a kid. I didn't start riding outside the neighborhood until I was 18 or so. Starting in my 20s, I spent decades averaging about 30 hours each week actually in the saddle, sometimes a block at a time and sometimes 100 miles or more without putting my boot on the ground. All of this is to tell you that I have some experience in the field. PLEASE pay attention.

The Goldwing is a great bike. The one you're rebuilding will be a great bike for many years -- or you will wreck it, rapidly. The choice is yours, and all but foreordained. Ride it before you're ready, and you WILL wreck it. It may KILL YOU in the process.

Find a Honda Super Cub (maybe a Trail 90), and learn to ride THAT. You'll learn to feel the bike, to shift, to work the brakes. When you're good with that, take the MSF Basic course and get your M ticket. With that in hand, it's time that you can safely move up to a Honda 350 or 360 from about the same era as your Wing, and do some serious riding in traffic. There will be a learning curve, because this is a bigger and more complex bike, though still fairly light. It's a good second bike. Put at least 2500 miles on this, BEFORE you make the Wing ready to ride. Having the "commuter" bike will not only give you the experience that you will need on the Wing, it also takes the imperative feeling out of the way. You won't have to rush the Wing.

Look at the list of bikes I've had. After all of those hundreds of thousands of miles, I STILL had to go through a transition when I got onto the Goldwing, and the bike was "ahead of me" for the first thousand miles or so. The only Goldwing that a new rider has any chance of surviving is a TRIKE.

This is video of a half-trained guy who bought a helicopter and couldn't wait until he was ready.

   Never miss a video: Subscribe to the GoldwingDocs YouTube channel today!


You're setting yourself up to be that guy on a Goldwing.
wgatesh
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2020 10:05 am
Location: México
Motorcycle: 1976 gl1000

Re: I'm a newbie on motorcycles and Gl1000 is my first bike

Post by wgatesh »

Solo So Long wrote: Fri Dec 11, 2020 9:24 pm First, DO NOT attempt to learn to ride on a Goldwing.

Second, REALLY do not attempt to learn to ride on a Goldwing.

I got my first motorcycle in 1968, when I was just a kid. I didn't start riding outside the neighborhood until I was 18 or so. Starting in my 20s, I spent decades averaging about 30 hours each week actually in the saddle, sometimes a block at a time and sometimes 100 miles or more without putting my boot on the ground. All of this is to tell you that I have some experience in the field. PLEASE pay attention.

The Goldwing is a great bike. The one you're rebuilding will be a great bike for many years -- or you will wreck it, rapidly. The choice is yours, and all but foreordained. Ride it before you're ready, and you WILL wreck it. It may KILL YOU in the process.

Find a Honda Super Cub (maybe a Trail 90), and learn to ride THAT. You'll learn to feel the bike, to shift, to work the brakes. When you're good with that, take the MSF Basic course and get your M ticket. With that in hand, it's time that you can safely move up to a Honda 350 or 360 from about the same era as your Wing, and do some serious riding in traffic. There will be a learning curve, because this is a bigger and more complex bike, though still fairly light. It's a good second bike. Put at least 2500 miles on this, BEFORE you make the Wing ready to ride. Having the "commuter" bike will not only give you the experience that you will need on the Wing, it also takes the imperative feeling out of the way. You won't have to rush the Wing.

Look at the list of bikes I've had. After all of those hundreds of thousands of miles, I STILL had to go through a transition when I got onto the Goldwing, and the bike was "ahead of me" for the first thousand miles or so. The only Goldwing that a new rider has any chance of surviving is a TRIKE.

This is video of a half-trained guy who bought a helicopter and couldn't wait until he was ready.

   Never miss a video: Subscribe to the GoldwingDocs YouTube channel today!


You're setting yourself up to be that guy on a Goldwing.
Thanks a lot for your knowledge. Yeah, I was thinking on purchasing a 100 or 150 CC bike before driving the goldwing. I'm gonna take a course too and I already have a lot of respect when it comes to bikes.
Solo So Long
Posts: 237
Joined: Thu Mar 26, 2020 4:07 pm
Location: Northern Nevada
Motorcycle: 1989 GL1500
1983 GW Interstate (ready to repair)
A pack of Super Cubs
Formerly (in order):
Honda Super Cub (bought 1968, sold ?)
Kawasaki Coyote (early 1970s)
Honda 350 (mid 1970s)
Kawasaki KZ900-PS (1977)
Honda Super Cubs (various years)
Kawasaki KZ1000C (1978)
Kawasaki KZ1000P (various years, 1980 - 2005)
Honda 360 (1983)
BMW R1150RT-P (2001)
BMW R1200RT-P (various years 2007 - 2018, NEVER AGAIN)

Re: I'm a newbie on motorcycles and Gl1000 is my first bike

Post by Solo So Long »

Get good riding small, and work your way up.

If you get something like a Trail 90, you'll get the skill AND have something worth hanging onto for a different kind of riding. What you want to learn on this is shifting and braking. Get a decent helmet, but at this point, a 3/4 will be a good choice.

I am 100% opposed to mandatory helmet laws.

You will almost never catch me riding without a helmet, and then pretty much only in the driveway, moving a bike from one parking place to another.

Do the math.

Get the "Ride Like A Pro" videos, practice on the Trail 90, take the MSF, get your M card.

Once you're good on the little bike, look around for a Honda CB350 (or something in that class) at a decent price. A mid-size commuter bike with a clutch, to complete your training on shifting and to get you used to something with some more mass and power. I would advise nothing more than a 500cc for this stage, and AVOID DIRT BIKES. You want a dependable street bike. You want to do a lot of in-town riding, with the occasional road trip of 100 miles, just for fun and to get comfortable.

Oh, yeah, when you get the commuter bike, then is when you get quality protective gear, and get used to wearing it. ATGATT (All The Gear, All The Time). I like a flip-up (modular) helmet, decent armor jacket, TOP QUALITY gloves and good boots.

The good news is that the fashionistas swap out their gear every year or two, so there's a bunch of decent used armor on the market, especially jackets.

If you look at motorcops, those fancy riding boots aren't a fashion statement, they are ARMOR. They cost a couple of hundred bucks (up), even with the price breaks and uniform allowances, and they are worth it. There are also some good "normal" boots, such as Corcoran II, and other types of riding boot. Cowboy boots, work boots, jump boots, combat boots, all of these are good but you really want to cover the ankle and go several inches up from there. Your three most likely injuries are to your head, ankles and your wrists/hands.



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At this point, start getting your Wing into shape. RIDE the commuter, work on the Wing.

Pretty soon, you will be ready for the Goldwing. You will be a skilled and confident rider, you will have the basic mindset built in, and you will have the safety gear. This is when you roll the Wing out, kick the tires (check pressure!) light the fires (check fluids first, look for leaks), take your deep breaths. pull in the clutch, put it in gear . . .

. . .and STALL. If you poll the others here, you will find out that just about all of them either stalled out or overrevved, that first time. So don't sweat it. After a try or two, you'll be moving.

STAY OFF THE DAMN HIGHWAY!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!

!!

Roll in the neighborhood, roll to the store, roll to the burger place. Short trips, a mile or two at a time for the first 50 miles, nothing above 35MPH. Get the feel, get the balance, get the first rush of GOSHWOWBOYOHBOY out of your system. This is a lot more bike than you are used to, but after all of those miles on the Super Cub and the commuter, you know what your're doing, so you'll know when you're ready to get onto the big road, and eventually onto the freeway.

And each step of the way, keep us up to date on your progress. We all started somewhere, too.


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