ASM or Accident Scene Management


Anything goes - doesn't fit any other category!
Post Reply
User avatar
echinus1988
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:53 pm
Location: Burns, WY
Motorcycle: 2006 GL1800, 1982 GL1100 Aspencade (Sold), 1980 GL1100 (sold), 2022 Harley Davidson Pan American Special

ASM or Accident Scene Management

Post by echinus1988 »



About 1.5 years ago I took the ASM course. I felt I learned something but seeing that I don't run into accidents very often I felt a refresher course would work well. My daughter is looking at getting a motorcycle so I asked her if she wanted to attend the class also. I drove about 2 hours to pick her up and go to the course (Did I mention I live in Wyoming, no classes) about 20 minutes from her place.

The instructor was fantastic! I walked away from the class feeling much better about my ability to handle an accident scene. I have since reviewed the topics again, bought a trauma kit and am talking to my friend who was an EMT about what to add to it. The one I have is basic but will do until I build a better one.

If you haven't ever taken this course I highly recommend it. They teach how to handle an accident scene and care for an injured rider. This is also usable for any accident since most include trauma to the victim. I'll be carrying a trauma kit in all my vehicles. The expense is minimal and there are sponsors who help with the cost. I paid $90 for both my daughter and me, regular was $90 each. It also included some breakfast items, lunch. After the basic course, you then have the option of taking an advanced class and learn more victim assistance techniques.

To find a class, go to www.roadguardians.org. I think you'll be glad you did.


User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 23781
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer
Contact:

Re: ASM or Accident Scene Management

Post by WingAdmin »

echinus1988 wrote: Fri May 03, 2024 5:38 pm About 1.5 years ago I took the ASM course. I felt I learned something but seeing that I don't run into accidents very often I felt a refresher course would work well. My daughter is looking at getting a motorcycle so I asked her if she wanted to attend the class also. I drove about 2 hours to pick her up and go to the course (Did I mention I live in Wyoming, no classes) about 20 minutes from her place.

The instructor was fantastic! I walked away from the class feeling much better about my ability to handle an accident scene. I have since reviewed the topics again, bought a trauma kit and am talking to my friend who was an EMT about what to add to it. The one I have is basic but will do until I build a better one.

If you haven't ever taken this course I highly recommend it. They teach how to handle an accident scene and care for an injured rider. This is also usable for any accident since most include trauma to the victim. I'll be carrying a trauma kit in all my vehicles. The expense is minimal and there are sponsors who help with the cost. I paid $90 for both my daughter and me, regular was $90 each. It also included some breakfast items, lunch. After the basic course, you then have the option of taking an advanced class and learn more victim assistance techniques.

To find a class, go to www.roadguardians.org. I think you'll be glad you did.
I love this. It's a fantastic idea. I have been giving away trauma kits as one of the monthly contest prizes for years - in fact, this month's contest prize is a trauma kit. I have had to use mine on a few occasions, including a motorcycle crash that I came across a few years ago:

Motorcycle crash
Motorcycle crash

I had to stop bleeding and stabilize this guy until the paramedics arrived. Keep your gloves handy! When I was working on this guy, my gloves were in the car, and I couldn't really say "wait here while I go get my gloves", so I ended up with his blood all over me. Not great.

But I highly encourage this training for everyone!
User avatar
echinus1988
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:53 pm
Location: Burns, WY
Motorcycle: 2006 GL1800, 1982 GL1100 Aspencade (Sold), 1980 GL1100 (sold), 2022 Harley Davidson Pan American Special

Re: ASM or Accident Scene Management

Post by echinus1988 »

I’m anxious for the advanced training next year. I couldn’t make the only one this year.

I’m hoping to never have to use it however I feel more confident I can meet the challenge if needed. I’m planning a number of road trips this year and my trauma kit will be with me. I think I’m going to get a bigger pouch because I wish to add a splint, blood clotting sponge, couple pairs of extra gloves, maybe a few more things as my friend suggests.

It is a fantastic course and I’m glad it was started. I joined as a member to help supply some funds to keep it going.

Ride safe.
FM-USA
Posts: 3388
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 8:40 am
Location: Near 60031
Motorcycle: 91-i

Re: ASM or Accident Scene Management

Post by FM-USA »

OH, what prompted me to post was, I carry a spare T-shirt & jammy bottoms as cold weather under garments & in case of trauma splash. They take up so little space.

Early 70s company I was at had mandatory First-Aid.
Talking with an EMT decades later knew of that class, via his mom, said it went way beyond just first-aid. OK, good for me and any victim(s) I run across. Back then materials in this class stayed since it was in its infancy, it was a "3 hour tour" I mean, class. We didn't receive any individual items for take-home nor was there a kit for purchase but much of it was already in my bath cabinet.
Tourniquet use were taught, what to use & how to use it including its use with a balled up 'X' as a pressure point.

In the decades after I ran across a few crashes where much of that class came in handy. What I carried on a midsize bike fit in a sandwich baggie but was sufficient, whereas the knowledge of what to do was more important. (mind fading to one roll-over crash mere feet in front my bike!!!).

SO! . . . If you can attend one of these classes, matters not the intensity, it can be a life saver.

.
When I do one thing, I'll sidestep a little & learn many things.
User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 23781
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer
Contact:

Re: ASM or Accident Scene Management

Post by WingAdmin »

echinus1988 wrote: Sun May 05, 2024 9:35 pm I’m anxious for the advanced training next year. I couldn’t make the only one this year.

I’m hoping to never have to use it however I feel more confident I can meet the challenge if needed. I’m planning a number of road trips this year and my trauma kit will be with me. I think I’m going to get a bigger pouch because I wish to add a splint, blood clotting sponge, couple pairs of extra gloves, maybe a few more things as my friend suggests.
I'd also recommend a tourniquet (and know how to use it). I bought this pack of tourniquets and have them in my car, etc. just in case. Clotting sponges work great, but on an arterial bleed, you need a tourniquet.
Find This Item on Amazon:
User avatar
echinus1988
Posts: 431
Joined: Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:53 pm
Location: Burns, WY
Motorcycle: 2006 GL1800, 1982 GL1100 Aspencade (Sold), 1980 GL1100 (sold), 2022 Harley Davidson Pan American Special

Re: ASM or Accident Scene Management

Post by echinus1988 »

Agreed. My trauma kit has a tourniquet in it and we got to put one on each other for practice, got explanation on where and how to apply. And not to loosen it once applied.

I still have a lot to learn but at least I have the basics.


Post Reply