How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs


Step-by-step tutorials on how to maintain and fix your GL1100
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paganplasma

Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by paganplasma » Sat Jun 04, 2011 3:17 am



Hi,Thank you for a very good article on spark plugs ,it has helped me a lot,blessings to you paganplasma. :P



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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by don3 » Thu Aug 04, 2011 7:54 am

Wingadmin and all,

When installing the new plugs, I like to slip the plug into an appropriate size of fuel hose which allows for hand starting the plug (by twisting the hose) and pads the porcelin insulator against nicks. I thought that you might want to add that to your steps (at least as an alterate step) or implement it in your regiment if you do not using fuel line already.

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by WingAdmin » Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:11 am

don3 wrote:Wingadmin and all,

When installing the new plugs, I like to slip the plug into an appropriate size of fuel hose which allows for hand starting the plug (by twisting the hose) and pads the porcelin insulator against nicks. I thought that you might want to add that to your steps (at least as an alterate step) or implement it in your regiment if you do not using fuel line already.
That's a good idea. I don't know about all spark plug sockets, but the ones I have, have rubber inserts that "grip" the plug when it is inserted. I then put a socket extension in the socket, and hand-tighten the plugs until finger-tight, to avoid cross-threading.

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by thehorseman1955 » Sat Sep 03, 2011 9:46 pm

also as a side note.if you use high temp antisieze, you dont want to slobber it on as the silver color comes from minute nickle particles.it acts as an abrasive on bearings, cylinder walls etc.
1975 Honda sl360,1977 honda cb550k, 1980 honda cx500d, 1982 honda gl1100a, 1982 suzuki gs450l, 1983 suzuki gs850l,1981 suzuki gs1000g,and 3,1970s Yamaha dirt bikes: these I still have. sold lots through the years but these all still do something for me

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by don3 » Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:30 am

thehorseman1955 wrote:also as a side note.if you use high temp antisieze, you dont want to slobber it on as the silver color comes from minute nickle particles.it acts as an abrasive on bearings, cylinder walls etc.
Excellent point! You Definitely do not want to hose your engine as a side effect of maintenance.

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by wayne ian » Tue Sep 06, 2011 9:08 pm

To starfleet I to am a forklift mech 28 years. Cat does not own Nissan. The french goverment does. Mitsubishi owns Cat. Hence the name MCF on all your eqipment. As for antisieze. Two standared types. Nickel base or copper base. I only use copper but nickel works. I will agree with original statement . NEVER install sparkplugs dry. A little plug wire grease would be helpfull as well.

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by SilverDave » Fri Oct 07, 2011 11:30 am

If you have modified your wiring harness, with an " Electrical Connection " harness ... GL1200's, mostly... the nice folks at Electrical connection recommended, to me , a gap of 40 thou to 50 thou., because the harness allows a bigger electrical punch ...

I was very dubious at first ... but, as I have a harness on my 1200, I tried it, and have run for the last 6 years at 45 thou... and plugs seem nice and tan looking, and bike starts well.
But I do think that with a regular system, you should stick to the recommended 30 thou.

From my reading, overgapping can cause the spark to blow away, slightly, resulting in even rougher running.

SilverDave

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by dmjacob1 » Sun Sep 29, 2013 11:48 am

WingAdmin wrote:
par4ugolf wrote:Removing, analyzing and replacing the plugs is not the real problem. The real problem is how in the world do I get at them? Yes I am a newbie to the world of Goldwings and some simple maintenance I can do myself, so I need all the help I can get.
What kind of Goldwing do you have?
Hi, How do you get to the plugs?? 1996 GL1500A. I have the plugs sitting around for 2 years... :evil:

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by WingAdmin » Sun Sep 29, 2013 2:58 pm

dmjacob1 wrote:
WingAdmin wrote:
par4ugolf wrote:Removing, analyzing and replacing the plugs is not the real problem. The real problem is how in the world do I get at them? Yes I am a newbie to the world of Goldwings and some simple maintenance I can do myself, so I need all the help I can get.
What kind of Goldwing do you have?
Hi, How do you get to the plugs?? 1996 GL1500A. I have the plugs sitting around for 2 years... :evil:
For the 1500, have a look in the 1500 section: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by dmjacob1 » Sun Sep 29, 2013 8:21 pm

Thank you very much...
I've found everything I ever wondered about...
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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by tubamanz » Mon Mar 31, 2014 10:13 pm

In the original how-to article for this thread it states that Honda does not document the spark plug torque values. In my Honda GoldWing GL1100 Service Manual, 1980-1983, on page 3-4 it states for spark plug torque values 12 ft-lbs or 16 N-m.

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by swr1977 » Sun Oct 12, 2014 3:38 pm

WingAdmin wrote: 18. Once you have threaded the plug in by hand several turns, put the spark plug tool on and continue to screw the plug gently into the head until it stops. This means the crush washer has contacted the engine. Once you get to this point, turn the spark plug tool exactly 1/2 turn, and remove the tool - the plug is now fully tightened. A plug that is tightened too tight can overheat and fail, or destroy the threads. Because the crush washer only crushes once, I do not re-use spark plugs in my bike. Honda does not publish a correct torque value for torquing plugs, so the only way to know that they are torqued correctly is to use new plugs, and to use the 1/2 turn method of tightening.
tubamanz wrote:In the original how-to article for this thread it states that Honda does not document the spark plug torque values. In my Honda GoldWing GL1100 Service Manual, 1980-1983, on page 3-4 it states for spark plug torque values 12 ft-lbs or 16 N-m.
A few weeks ago I pulled my plugs to trouble shoot and they do need to be replaced. I'm about to winterize my bike but haven't gotten new plugs yet so the old are still in and I didn't put any anti-seize on them when I put them back in. I was thinking about starting the bike so the oil is warm for a oil change and I need to drain the fuel from the carbs, So I thought letting it run out of gas with the fuel valve close would lessen the amount of gas in the carbs to drain.

Is it OK to do this using the old plugs? will it hurt anything?

Also why do you use the "1/2 turn method" vrs torquing the plugs like it says in the manual?
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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by WingAdmin » Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:13 pm

swr1977 wrote:
tubamanz wrote:In the original how-to article for this thread it states that Honda does not document the spark plug torque values. In my Honda GoldWing GL1100 Service Manual, 1980-1983, on page 3-4 it states for spark plug torque values 12 ft-lbs or 16 N-m.
A few weeks ago I pulled my plugs to trouble shoot and they do need to be replaced. I'm about to winterize my bike but haven't gotten new plugs yet so the old are still in and I didn't put any anti-seize on them when I put them back in. I was thinking about starting the bike so the oil is warm for a oil change and I need to drain the fuel from the carbs, So I thought letting it run out of gas with the fuel valve close would lessen the amount of gas in the carbs to drain.

Is it OK to do this using the old plugs? will it hurt anything?

Also why do you use the "1/2 turn method" vrs torquing the plugs like it says in the manual?
You won't harm things not using anti-seize for a single run, plugs tend to seize over time and repeated heat cycles.

The "1/2 turn" method guarantees the plug is seated correctly, while also guaranteeing that you aren't going to strip the threads out of the head. The plug has a crush washer on it, so when the plug is seated finger tight, this washer is against the plug opening. 1/2 turn more crushes the washer against the opening providing the correct amount of pressure and torque.

Once plugs have been removed, the washer has already been crushed - so do NOT use the "1/2 turn" method on plugs that have already been installed, or you will find yourself stripping the threads out of your head! In this case, you should torque the plugs (gently) with an accurate torque wrench.

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Re: How to remove, analyze, gap and replace your spark plugs

Post by swr1977 » Mon Oct 13, 2014 1:13 am

WingAdmin wrote: You won't harm things not using anti-seize for a single run, plugs tend to seize over time and repeated heat cycles.

The "1/2 turn" method guarantees the plug is seated correctly, while also guaranteeing that you aren't going to strip the threads out of the head. The plug has a crush washer on it, so when the plug is seated finger tight, this washer is against the plug opening. 1/2 turn more crushes the washer against the opening providing the correct amount of pressure and torque.

Once plugs have been removed, the washer has already been crushed - so do NOT use the "1/2 turn" method on plugs that have already been installed, or you will find yourself stripping the threads out of your head! In this case, you should torque the plugs (gently) with an accurate torque wrench.
Thanks for your explanation. That puts my mind at ease. I'll get the oil filter and plugs ordered and get the old gal winterized before the hard cold starts.

Happy riding my friend!


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