A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims


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A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by WingAdmin » Sat Jun 30, 2018 1:14 pm



It was time for new tires again. I bought a new set of tires for my GL1500, and called up my friend to ask when he might be at his shop - he has a professional tire mounting machine that makes demounting and mounting tires an effortless snap.

Correction. He HAD a tire machine. He informed me, to my horror, that he had sold it the month before. What to do now? I had read about a new mounting procedure that some people had tried, I figured now was a good as a time as any to give it a try, so I broke out my tire irons and got to work.

First, obviously, you will be removing the wheels from your bike. Not having to take my wheels to the shop to have them mounted means I can do one at a time, which is a lot easier than pulling both wheels off the bike at the same time.

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With the wheel removed, I set it on a small piece of carpet to prevent scratching or damage to the wheel.

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I use a valve core removal tool to unscrew the valve core from the valve stem. Careful - there is a lot of air pressure in there that will try to fire the valve core out of the valve stem like a bullet! This will rapidly deflate the tire.

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Next, I use a bead breaker to break the bead on the tire. This basically means you are peeling the tire's bead away from the tire rim. It has been held there with a fair amount of pressure for some time, so it takes a bit of force to break it free. This cheap and simple bead breaker from Harbor Freight makes the job simple. Alternatively, Motion Pro has a set of tire levers that can be hooked together to also function as a bead breaker. You need to break the bead all the way around the tire, on both sides.

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We will need some tire lubricant. Cars and shops use a gooey paste for this. This goopy lubricant is incompatible with the balancing beads that I use in my tires, so I need something that does not leave behind residue, and this Purple Power Lubricant does the trick. Don't use dish soap or detergent - anything alkaline or acidic can etc and corrode your aluminum rims, causing air leaks.

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I put this lubricant in a spray bottle - it's fairly thick, so you need a decent sprayer that can handle it. It is water-based, so it will evaporate - you may need to reapply it if you take some time to do this job.

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With the bead of the tire separated from the rim, I spray bead lubricant all around the tire. I then push the side of the tire down, away from the rim edge.

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In the middle of the rim is a deeper channel. The tire must be pushed down so that it can rest in this channel. This allows the tire to shift when we start to demount it on the opposite end.

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Next, 180 degrees away from where the tire has been pushed down into the channel, I push these rim protectors, also from Motion Pro onto the rim. These are important! Without them, you will gouge and damage the rim, and the tire bead will no longer seal against it.

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While pushing the opposite end of the tire down into the channel, I use the spoon end of a tire iron to push up under the rim and hook the edge of the tire from the inside.

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Once you have hooked the tire with the tire iron, pivot it back over the rim to pull the tire up and over like the edge. Notice the tire is actually pulled away from the rim - this is why the opposite end of the tire must be pushed down into the channel. If it wasn't, the tire would not slip enough to give you the free play in order for it to do this. It's also why you want to use lots of lubricant, to allow the tire to slide this way.

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While holding one of the tire irons in place, repeat the process with a second one, again pulling the edge of the tire up and over.

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Slide one tire iron over and work the tire up and over the rim there as well.

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Slide one of the rim protectors over, and repeat the process. When you get about half of the tire off the rim, you can pull the rest off by hand.

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Now one side of the tire has been pulled completely up and over the rim.

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Looking at the bottom, you can see how the tire can be slid up along the rim.

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After applying more lubricant, reach in with the tire irons to hook the far side of the tire the same way.

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Looking from underneath, you can see how the far side of the tire has been hooked by the tire irons and is being pulled up and over the rim. There is a fair amount of pressure holding the tire against the rim (it's a tight fit!) so the lubricant is necessary to get it to slide up and over the rim as it is removed.

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Now that the tire is removed from the rim, it's a good time to clean the rim.

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It's also a good idea to remove the valve stem and replace it - valve stems should be replaced regularly. The tire must be removed to replace the valve stem, so now is the perfect time to do it. For rubber stems, I use a valve stem tool. For metal stems, they normally have a retaining nut that must be removed.

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Screw the puller onto the old rubber valve stem, then use a block of wood for leverage, pull the stem up and out of the tire:

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Lubricate the new valve stem, and push it up through the hole from the inside:

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Screw the puller tool onto the new stem, and pull it the rest of the way into place:

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Mounting the New Tire

This is the new technique that I read about and thought I would give a try. To start, I bought four of these, each packages contains two lashing straps. These were from Harbor Freight, but I now realize that I could have actually gotten them cheaper on Amazon - you can buy a package of ten for $20 there.

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I cut the ends off of the 12 foot straps to make them about 2 feet long, and strapped them around the new tire evenly.

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Next, going around in a circle, I squeezed the tire together so the beads touched one another, then tightened the straps to hold them this way.

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With all the straps tightened and the beads touching each other all the way around, we have two benefits for mounting this stiff new tire: first, the inner diameter of the tire opens up slightly, making it easier to mount. Second, we only have to mount the tire to the rim ONCE, instead of doing it twice (once for each bead). Before starting, I now put the tire out in the sun for ten minutes. This warms it up and softens the rubber, making it again a bit easier to mount.

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Putting a bit of lubricant on the tire ONLY (and not on the rim) I was able to easily lever the new tire onto the rim the same way I took the old one off. Start with one end of the tire shoved down into the rim's center channel, and work the tire beads over the rim gradually, the exact reverse of how the old tire was taken off.

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IMPORTANT NOTE!! Motorcycle tires are usually directional!! Make sure you check the rotation of the tire (it will have an arrow on it showing the direction of rotation) before mounting it!

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You don't want to realize you did it backwards and have to take it off again! It might be a good idea to put a temporary mark on the rim before taking the old tire off, just so you don't mix it up:

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Aluminum rims pit over time, and as they do, they begin to leak. It's very annoying to have to refill your tires with air every time you want to go riding! I use this bead sealer compound to stop this from happening. It will seal the worst, pitted rim.

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It comes out of the can as a thick goo, but dries quickly (within a minute) after applied. I wear rubber gloves, dip my pinky finger in the goo, and spread it over the INSIDE of the rim, where the tire bead will contact it. I then wipe out any spilled or excess from the outside of the rim. Because the straps on the tire are holding the bead away from the rim, it dries easily.

After 15 minutes the sealant is well cured, so I loosen the straps one by one and pull them off the tire.

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Now the moment of truth: Sealing the bead. To start with, I use my finger to spread a little bit of tire lubricant along the exposed area of the rim between the tire bead and the rim. This helps the tire slide along the rim until its bead meets up with the rim. You want the tire to do this evenly so that the bead is fully seated all the away around on both sides.

I use these clip-on valve chucks - however I use a pair of needle nose pliers to rip out the valve actuating piece in the middle of them. Basically you want to get as much air into the tire as fast as you can. There is no valve core in the valve stem to actuate, so the actuator doesn't need to be there obstructing airflow. I clip it to the valve stem, then hook up the air compressor to blast air into the tire. As the tire inflates, it pushes outwards, sliding the tire bead out toward the rim (which is why we need the lubricant). As the bead contacts the rim, you will hear a loud bang - one for each side of the tire.

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If the bead doesn't seat right away, I will unclip the hose and let the tire deflate, check where it has not seated, apply a bit more lubricant, and try again.

Once the bead has seated, I screw the valve core back into the valve stem, and fill the tire to the prescribed pressure. I check both beads, making sure the tire is perfectly even all the way around. Manufacturers usually mold a line around the circumference of the tire near the bead. As the tire spins, make sure the distance from this line to the wheel rim does not change. This indicates that the tire has seated evenly all the way around. I'll also spray some soapy water around the diameter of the tire where it meets the rim, as well as on the valve stem, checking for bubbles that might indicate a leak.

The tire is now completely mounted and ready for use once the wheel is reinstalled. For our pre-GL1800 Goldwings, when replacing the rear tire, don't forget to re-lubricate the rear splines with proper Moly paste (not grease!) before reinstalling the rear wheel.

So how did this new mounting method work? Amazingly well! I was astounded at how easily the tire popped onto the rim. The added benefit of only having to work one bead over the rim instead of two makes the process even quicker.



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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by someone548 » Sat Jun 30, 2018 1:49 pm

This is a very timely post. I have a new tire to put on mine next week. Going to do it this way and see how it goes. Thanks as always!

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by AZgl1800 » Sat Jun 30, 2018 10:50 pm

instead of those pretty straps,

I have seen tire guys use big Zip Ties and do the same thing.
that idea has been around for a very long time, it just does not seem to get much publicity.
~John

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by WingAdmin » Sun Jul 01, 2018 12:11 am

AZgl1800 wrote:
Sat Jun 30, 2018 10:50 pm
instead of those pretty straps,

I have seen tire guys use big Zip Ties and do the same thing.
that idea has been around for a very long time, it just does not seem to get much publicity.
I thought about zip ties as well, but they are harder and narrower - and I didn't want to cut or otherwise damage the beads on the tire (that are supposed to be sealing against the rim) with narrow, hard zip ties. The soft, wide straps are very easy on the bead.

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by bikommuter » Sun Jul 01, 2018 8:11 am

I bought 1 of these (economy model) a few years back. Mine is blue. :) https://www.nomartirechanger.com/Cycle_ ... -ch100.htm
I've changed about 20 tires with it and it gets easier every time. I've done small tires (CM400T) and large tires (GL1100 and VTX 1800).
I did my 86 Shadow last and it took me maybe 2 hours including taking the wheel off the bike and re-installing. I did both the front and the back in the same afternoon. I'm 67 and I don't like to struggle when there's an easier way. I don't work for the company, but I do like promoting companies that make a good product (here in the USA) and sell it at a reasonable price. The way I look at it, at over $60.00 per tire change, I paid for my changer after I did 8 tires. :D

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Ravyn » Sun Jul 01, 2018 9:49 am

bikommuter wrote:
Sun Jul 01, 2018 8:11 am
I bought 1 of these (economy model) a few years back. Mine is blue. :) https://www.nomartirechanger.com/Cycle_ ... -ch100.htm
I've changed about 20 tires with it and it gets easier every time. I've done small tires (CM400T) and large tires (GL1100 and VTX 1800).
I did my 86 Shadow last and it took me maybe 2 hours including taking the wheel off the bike and re-installing. I did both the front and the back in the same afternoon. I'm 67 and I don't like to struggle when there's an easier way. I don't work for the company, but I do like promoting companies that make a good product (here in the USA) and sell it at a reasonable price. The way I look at it, at over $60.00 per tire change, I paid for my changer after I did 8 tires. :D
Wow ! 60 dollars per tire change, you be gettin ripped off boy! Sure glad I don't live on the east coast. There is a small automotive repair shop here in town that changes my M/C tires for 10 dollars a tire. Used to be 8 dollars, he's getting greedy. ;)

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by fruffing » Sun Jul 01, 2018 1:15 pm

How do you balance the tires after you install them yourself?

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by WingAdmin » Sun Jul 01, 2018 6:01 pm

fruffing wrote:
Sun Jul 01, 2018 1:15 pm
How do you balance the tires after you install them yourself?
I use Counteract balancing beads.

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by romanfj » Mon Jul 02, 2018 5:43 am

Excellent tutorial! Have you added it tot he How-To section?
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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by themainviking » Mon Jul 02, 2018 7:10 am

romanfj wrote:
Mon Jul 02, 2018 5:43 am
Excellent tutorial! Have you added it tot he How-To section?
You be askin' this Q of the site owner/admin?

Hawwwww, hahaha, that be tellin' him.
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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by cbx4evr » Mon Jul 02, 2018 4:37 pm

Ravyn wrote:
Sun Jul 01, 2018 9:49 am
Wow ! 60 dollars per tire change, you be gettin ripped off boy! Sure glad I don't live on the east coast. There is a small automotive repair shop here in town that changes my M/C tires for 10 dollars a tire. Used to be 8 dollars, he's getting greedy. ;)
You better hope your shop is not reading this thread. He's working way too cheap. You had better drop a box of Krispy Kreme's there occasionally to maintain those cheap rates. $40 is not uncommon and some shop are adding a fee if you don't but the tire there.
"It´s a friggen motorcycle, it´s not supposed to be comfortable, quiet or safe. The wind noise is supposed to hurt your ears, the seat should be hard and riding it should make you s**t your pants every now and then. "

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by imsbreezy » Mon Jul 02, 2018 8:45 pm

Good tutorial. Having said that, I would not recommend putting both beads on the rim at the same time. I work at a tire dealer and have seen beads destroyed by well meaning DYI customers trying to do it the easy way. Not saying it can't be done. Just wouldn't do it myself. Especially on a bike. 1100 is too big to have a bead fail at highway speed. Had it happen on a 400, bad enough.

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Ravyn » Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:10 pm

cbx4evr wrote:
Mon Jul 02, 2018 4:37 pm
Ravyn wrote:
Sun Jul 01, 2018 9:49 am
Wow ! 60 dollars per tire change, you be gettin ripped off boy! Sure glad I don't live on the east coast. There is a small automotive repair shop here in town that changes my M/C tires for 10 dollars a tire. Used to be 8 dollars, he's getting greedy. ;)
You better hope your shop is not reading this thread. He's working way too cheap. You had better drop a box of Krispy Kreme's there occasionally to maintain those cheap rates. $40 is not uncommon and some shop are adding a fee if you don't but the tire there.
Nahhhh, he isn't reading this. It's an automotive shop, no bike riders there and they don't sell tires :-) I took him some donuts one time and he said he doesn't eat that sh...t. So now I didn't know what to do with them. I took them to the local police department......hahahaha

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by WingAdmin » Tue Jul 03, 2018 8:43 am

imsbreezy wrote:
Mon Jul 02, 2018 8:45 pm
Good tutorial. Having said that, I would not recommend putting both beads on the rim at the same time. I work at a tire dealer and have seen beads destroyed by well meaning DYI customers trying to do it the easy way. Not saying it can't be done. Just wouldn't do it myself. Especially on a bike. 1100 is too big to have a bead fail at highway speed. Had it happen on a 400, bad enough.
Any specific reason why? The tire went on so much easier with the two beads together like this, that very little force at all was applied to the bead - I'd say it was much easier on the bead this way, in fact.

I have seen people who tried this online using zip ties instead of nylon straps - I would not recommend that. The nylon straps are fairly soft and easy on the bead, and comparatively little force is being applied (it doesn't take much to hold the two beads together). Zip ties on the other hand are narrow, hard, and have sharp, square edges. I suppose zip ties (which would be easier to apply) could be used to help demount the old tire, as it's going to be tossed anyway.

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Houdy01 » Tue Jul 03, 2018 9:09 am

Hello to all! My first post! Don't know why, just always happy reading.
I've been riding motorcycles my entire life and replaced a lot of tires. Years ago when I got my first bike with tubeless tires, I was amazed how hard it was to get them broke from the rim. Then I realized, these tires are not going to be used again. :roll: I got out my hacksaw and sawed through the tire, careful not to hit the rim. Then the tire just comes right off. No fighting, trying to get it broke down or pulled over the rim.
Just be sure you let the air out first! :lol:

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Ravyn » Tue Jul 03, 2018 9:16 am

Houdy01 wrote:
Tue Jul 03, 2018 9:09 am
Hello to all! My first post! Don't know why, just always happy reading.
I've been riding motorcycles my entire life and replaced a lot of tires. Years ago when I got my first bike with tubeless tires, I was amazed how hard it was to get them broke from the rim. Then I realized, these tires are not going to be used again. :roll: I got out my hacksaw and sawed through the tire, careful not to hit the rim. Then the tire just comes right off. No fighting, trying to get it broke down or pulled over the rim.
Just be sure you let the air out first! :lol:
Welcome to the forum. :D

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by WingAdmin » Tue Jul 03, 2018 10:40 am

Houdy01 wrote:
Tue Jul 03, 2018 9:09 am
Hello to all! My first post! Don't know why, just always happy reading.
I've been riding motorcycles my entire life and replaced a lot of tires. Years ago when I got my first bike with tubeless tires, I was amazed how hard it was to get them broke from the rim. Then I realized, these tires are not going to be used again. :roll: I got out my hacksaw and sawed through the tire, careful not to hit the rim. Then the tire just comes right off. No fighting, trying to get it broke down or pulled over the rim.
Just be sure you let the air out first! :lol:
A hacksaw is good for getting through the carcass, you might find it easier to use a set of bolt cutters to cut through the bead however (it's got steel running through it for strength).

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Goldwing7777 » Tue Jul 10, 2018 11:22 am

Interesting thread.

BUT I was a bit surprised to read "... valve stems should be replaced regularly."

Tyre shops here in the UK have been indoctrinated (just possibly by the vendors of valve stems ?) to change them at the drop of a hat.

However - my late father bought a brand new Mini and sold it after 6 years and 125,000 miles and numerous tyre replacements - it still had the original (leak-free) valve stems fitted. He refused to change them as there was nothing wrong with them.

Are newer ones made from an inferior material ... ?

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by WingAdmin » Tue Jul 10, 2018 12:46 pm

Goldwing7777 wrote:
Tue Jul 10, 2018 11:22 am
Interesting thread.

BUT I was a bit surprised to read "... valve stems should be replaced regularly."

Tyre shops here in the UK have been indoctrinated (just possibly by the vendors of valve stems ?) to change them at the drop of a hat.

However - my late father bought a brand new Mini and sold it after 6 years and 125,000 miles and numerous tyre replacements - it still had the original (leak-free) valve stems fitted. He refused to change them as there was nothing wrong with them.

Are newer ones made from an inferior material ... ?
Tire valve stems can and do fail. They're made of rubber, and can dry rot or crack from heat, ozone and UV exposure. We have had several users on the site report experiencing a valve stem failure.

A valve stem failing on a car is usually an inconvenience. On a motorcycle, it can be fatal.

For a couple dollars, it's worth replacing them, in my book. I replace mine with metal stems that don't suffer from the problems of the rubber ones.

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Goldwing7777 » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:34 pm

Never known one fail.
I've been involved with very fast cars/ordinary cars/motorcycles for 50+ years and we never used to change them with the modern frequency. Don't recall vehicles flying off the road with 'valve stem failure' - but maybe people like Schrader [who seemed to have virtually a monopoly] used decent rubber and vulcanisation to the brass body in those days..

The main seal area is totally hidden away from ozone and light so cannot see how that actually affects them ?
Cannot be so sure about heat as the UK is usually 'moderate' at best.
That alone could be a factor - but how do we know if the stem has been bent beyond 'elastic limits' by someone trying to get an inflator on the stem ?
I totally agree that a valve stem SUDDENLY failing could be serious on a bike - but how often does one fail SUDDENLY ?
I also agree all-metal valve units are safer.

Round here it is inappropriate speed that is usually/most often cited as the cause of fatal accidents. Apart from one where a home-modified trike had the throttle jam wide open and that caused a crash.
[We hear motorcycles revving to 8 or 9,000 + rpm and going up through perhaps 4 gears yet we have a 60 mph limit on the country roads nearest to us].

Have yet to see a UK inquest actually blaming a failed rubber valve stem ...

Have the vendors of rubber valve stems put the 'frighteners' on tyre firms to boost sales
or has the quality of rubber/manufacture been degraded?
I wonder ... but each to their own.

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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Ravyn » Tue Jul 10, 2018 10:14 pm

Goldwing7777 wrote:
Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:34 pm
Never known one fail.
I've been involved with very fast cars/ordinary cars/motorcycles for 50+ years and we never used to change them with the modern frequency. Don't recall vehicles flying off the road with 'valve stem failure' - but maybe people like Schrader [who seemed to have virtually a monopoly] used decent rubber and vulcanisation to the brass body in those days..

The main seal area is totally hidden away from ozone and light so cannot see how that actually affects them ?
Cannot be so sure about heat as the UK is usually 'moderate' at best.
That alone could be a factor - but how do we know if the stem has been bent beyond 'elastic limits' by someone trying to get an inflator on the stem ?
I totally agree that a valve stem SUDDENLY failing could be serious on a bike - but how often does one fail SUDDENLY ?
I also agree all-metal valve units are safer.

Round here it is inappropriate speed that is usually/most often cited as the cause of fatal accidents. Apart from one where a home-modified trike had the throttle jam wide open and that caused a crash.
[We hear motorcycles revving to 8 or 9,000 + rpm and going up through perhaps 4 gears yet we have a 60 mph limit on the country roads nearest to us].

Have yet to see a UK inquest actually blaming a failed rubber valve stem ...

Have the vendors of rubber valve stems put the 'frighteners' on tyre firms to boost sales
or has the quality of rubber/manufacture been degraded?
I wonder ... but each to their own.
Your line of thinking seems to be a rather dangerous one. Why would you not want a nice new rubber valve stem along with that nice new modern rubber compound tire you just installed instead of an old hard rubber stem . ? You have been very lucky my friend. I have been riding for 56 years in that time I have had two stems fail. One developed a slow leak at the base of the stem next to the rim. The other simply just failed rather quickly. Luckily and I mean LUCKILY I was able to control it until I got down to about five miles per hour and then just fell over. Both were on the front tire. I wish you luck in your back arsewards thinking but I can't help but think your day is coming.
I bet there are others in here as well that may have had a similar experience. Oh, and BTW I have been a mechanic most of my working life. Both on import autos and 23 years as a professional motor cycle mechanic.

Goldwing7777
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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Goldwing7777 » Wed Jul 11, 2018 6:00 pm

As I said [without wishing to start a keyboard war and flinging insults about ] "each to their own".

I would only add - I was brought up to question opinions and examine facts.

Fair play to you though - I've never heard or read the "back arsewards" description before.

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Ravyn
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1980 Honda cx500 turbo..."for sale" My latest bike is a 1994 GL1500SE, side car rig.

Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Ravyn » Wed Jul 11, 2018 8:56 pm

Goldwing7777 wrote:
Wed Jul 11, 2018 6:00 pm
As I said [without wishing to start a keyboard war and flinging insults about ] "each to their own".

I would only add - I was brought up to question opinions and examine facts.

Fair play to you though - I've never heard or read the "back arsewards" description before.
Not trying to start any kind of wars here. Just stating an opinion. I simply think you are not thinking everything through.
As far as "back arsewards' goes..... I didn't want to say "A.. backwards" in here. Figured you would figure it out... :o :)

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raven41951
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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by raven41951 » Sun Jul 22, 2018 1:28 pm

Just a few words about rubber. It is a mix of natural and synthetic materials which injected into a mold and cured. The brass/metal portion has been inserted into the mold first and the rubber then injected. The mold is heated to the "curing temperature", which is a chemical reaction called cross-linking. Once cured, it will retain that shape for its life.

The rubber contains plasticizers which help it release from the mold and also help with its flexibility. When stretched too far, the chemical bonds created in the curing process break and the rubber is no longer one piece. Also affecting the chemical bonds are other factors including TIME, ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS and EXPOSURE. When left in the open untreated, it will become brittle and fail. Note that tires are not sold after they are three years old. Ever seen cracks in a tire that's been sitting for a long period? Same material is in the valve stems.

Normal use and cleaning keeps the rubber "alive" by replacing lost plasticizers. Simple washing the wheels adds lubrication to the stem. However, there is still degradation. Yes I have seen them last a lot longer, and also less. My 1500 had valve stem failure after having new tires installed. I had asked for new stems as well but they only had one. They didn't tell me and I had stem failure on the way home. Guess which one failed. Anyone that does not replace valve stems at least every five years is toying with failure.

Goldwing7777
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Re: A new method of demounting and remounting tires on rims

Post by Goldwing7777 » Sun Jul 22, 2018 5:30 pm

Perhaps instead of lecturing us on your considerable knowledge about the chemical make-up of rubber you should ask the far more relevant question?

Are we actually talking about Chinese or foreign/unknown/unbranded 'lookalike' valve stems now churned out at a very low price [and possibly inferior materials] when I am clearly talking about the massively long life of properly treated original Schrader stems that were once a universal fitment and ultra-reliable ?
I'm intrigued by your statement that plasticizers are replenished by washing. ["Simple washing the wheels adds lubrication to the stem." !!!] I must stop drinking water if it contains plasticizers ...


Maybe even Schrader-branded stems have now been cheaply sourced ?

Bosch was once a reliable brand but their name is now found on non-German items which I also do not trust ... (I don't believe the 'marketing blather' about made to our standards).
One UK firm is stamping "Stossdampfer" on boxes of Far Eastern shock absorbers that have never been near Germany.

I just know from past practical experience that 'older' stems were NOT regarded as throw-away items. We used to be offered the option of new stems - often with the comment "If they are not leaking - leave them and don't disturb them."

Modern ones may well be suspect. Keep throwing them away. Keep providing the revenue stream for the makers of lower-quality valve stems. You'll probably be safer that way.

On a separate note - Tyre life. 3 years? Interesting.
The UK tyre trade tried (and failed) to get the UK MOT test standard altered to 'Fail' tyres that were 5 years or more old.
I've had Battlax motorcycle tyres develop dangerous cracks after a lot less than 5 years.



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