Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
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Mag
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Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam

Post by Mag »



So, now that the bike is up and running, but I do not know overall engine condition, I just know (I think) low gas mileage and weak running at start up cold (which is also somewhat of a trait of 1988). So here is the low down...
- 1988 1500
- 43k miles
- When riding, the bike seems to run smooth, but 1500s run smooth anyway.
- Starting cold, I choke the bike, and it runs up high, then idles low. Once warmed up it runs fine.
- When I bought the bike, it was just serviced, oil change, etc., I have the paper and I talked to the mechanic. He said that the bike was in great running condition.

Whatcha think? I read the directions, 1 oz per gallon, figured I would throw the 6 ozs in on the next fill up since I think it could not hurt. I would then put in the oil on the next oil change (3k miles).

I am hoping it would clear everything out, possibly make it run better, etc., etc. I read through all the articles here and there was not anything really specific on what to do and such. Just want to make sure it makes sense.

Thoughts?


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seabee_
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Re: Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam

Post by seabee_ »

Go ahead and run it through. Every spring I run half a can thru a tank of fresh gas. If you don't know when the fuel filter was last replaced I would replace it after running it thru. Any crud that gets loosened up can clog the filter. I have also ran 4 ozs in the oil before an oil change every now and then. It helps to clean out the clutch plates (wet clutch system, uses the crank case oil) and the starter sprag clutch. Just be sure to keep the rpms down under 3500 while running it in the oil for about 100 miles.. It will also clean the varnish from the oil passages.
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Fulcrum
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Re: Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam

Post by Fulcrum »

Seafoam is amazing stuff. If you are going to add it to the oil do it before the oil change not after. Helps break up the sludge before your oil change.
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Re: Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam

Post by WingAdmin »

seabee_ wrote:Go ahead and run it through. Every spring I run half a can thru a tank of fresh gas. If you don't know when the fuel filter was last replaced I would replace it after running it thru. Any crud that gets loosened up can clog the filter. I have also ran 4 ozs in the oil before an oil change every now and then. It helps to clean out the clutch plates (wet clutch system, uses the crank case oil) and the starter sprag clutch. Just be sure to keep the rpms down under 3500 while running it in the oil for about 100 miles.. It will also clean the varnish from the oil passages.
This is exactly the way I use it as well.
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Re: Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam

Post by thrasherg »

Seafoam is a good preventative measure, I throw some in my oil about 200 miles before an oil change is due and occasionally put some in my gas tank to just clean the system.. I would recommend putting some in your tank every couple of months, it also helps remove any water that might have got in the fuel tank..

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Re: Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam

Post by gold bobber »

Hello everyone I am a new member, If you want to give your carbs an amazing cleaning, here you go. Close pitcock,take fuel line off of pitcock, extend your fuel line with a fuel line barb. put the extended line in the can of seafoam, start the bike when the bike starts smoking heavy you know you have loaded the carbs up with sea foam. hook fuel line back up to pitcock, let bike sit for two days. Then turn on fuel and start bike, when the smoke stops and your sure that all the seafoam is cleared from the carbs, change your filter and plugs. You won't believe the difference, I have a 1984 gl1200 A, It was sitting outside covered up with a tarp for 3 years, never started, through cold winters. It would barley run, I did this method and BAM! started up and ran good, So if you think your carbs need rebuilt, try this first. But if your bike is so bad that it won't start, open the drain screws on the float bowl's and let them run empty,then run a hot wire to the power lead on the fuel pump, when the seafoam begins to run out of the drain screw, close them and let the pump run a little while to fill them.
t
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Re: Should I or Shouldn't I Seafoam

Post by eklimek »

Gold bobber suggests you soak the fuel bowels in varnish removing solvent. I have also run it through the carburetor passageways by spraying ether while cranking. It will run and smokes up the neighbourhood real nice, until fuel arrives. (Wonder if it retards internal rusting in the mufflers?)

Pretty much any combustible solvent will accomplish the same thing.

In addition to varnish you have either dissolved or disturbed, particulates go downstream like dead fish and then you are committed to opening the blocked passages. But then you would miss the smoke and fun. If you try this using oil of wintergreen, please let me know if it adds a hint of minty freshness.

Full disclaimer - while I may have done this, in my chainsaw, lawn mower and goldwing, I take no responsibility for the safety of those imitating my reckless behavior. That I have done so does not imply that it is safe.


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