My Bike PC


Technical information and Q&A applicable to all years and models of Goldwings
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WingAdmin
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My Bike PC

Post by WingAdmin »



Several years ago, I found myself faced with building something to control my heated gear. I thought; "I could build this easily from a microcontroller." Of course...if you have a microcontroller, you can program it to do a lot more than just control your heated gear. So what else could I make it do? Operate my radio...show what gear I'm in...and much more.

And thus my "Bike PC" was born. I've had many people over the years ask me about this project, what it does, and how it works. As a result, I decided to create a video that shows just exactly what it does, and how it operates.



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The original circuit design
The original circuit design


Breadboarding the design
Breadboarding the design


Writing the code
Writing the code


Assembling the prototype
Assembling the prototype


The finished product before the lid went on
The finished product before the lid went on




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Rednaxs60
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Re: My Bike PC

Post by Rednaxs60 »

Wondered about this as well since the first time I saw it on your video about your 1500. Looks great, now for another project. I'm surmising that this can be used on different models and manufacturers as well.

Looking at the Speeduino project as a replacement ECU for my '85 Limited. Have the Arduino components and interface board, but a lot more research is required.

Thanks for putting this information on the forum.

Cheers
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Re: My Bike PC

Post by DenverWinger »

A lot higher level code than I expected to see.... I spent the '80s writing Assembly Language code for a data acquisition device my company was making/operating. Single 6502 processor in early '80's and later in the mid '80's multiple 64180 CPU chips, a high-horsepower version of a Z80 chip. It could directly address 1MB of DRAM and ran at 10MHz!! Had many other on-chip peripherals, too.

We had it in a multi-processor configuration, a "Master" processor which performed control operations of the (up to) 16 "Slave" Processors which did the actual data acquisition, collecting data from them, pre-processing the data combining the multiple slave's data into a single data "records" and storing these data records in an 8MB EPROM Array, burning records to EPROMs on-the-fly. This was mid 80's. The non-volatile storage was important due to the severe environment this operated in. Storage was later upgraded in 1991 to eight 8MB PCMCIA EEPROM Flash storage modules. Much smaller, 8 times the data capacity and saved having to erase all those EPROM chips with UV light.

I had left the company in 1990, but they called me back in 1991 as a consultant to re-write the EPROM data storage routines to address the new Flash Memory array. There was some 40,000 lines of assembly code in this system!
♫ 99 Little Bugs in the Code, ♪
♪ 99 Bugs in the Code. ♫ :(
♫ Take one down, Patch it around, ♪
♫ 127 Little Bugs in the Code. ♫ ♪ :shock:

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Re: My Bike PC

Post by WingAdmin »

DenverWinger wrote:
Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:49 pm
A lot higher level code than I expected to see.... I spent the '80s writing Assembly Language code for a data acquisition device my company was making/operating. Single 6502 processor in early '80's and later in the mid '80's multiple 64180 CPU chips, a high-horsepower version of a Z80 chip. It could directly address 1MB of DRAM and ran at 10MHz!! Had many other on-chip peripherals, too.

We had it in a multi-processor configuration, a "Master" processor which performed control operations of the (up to) 16 "Slave" Processors which did the actual data acquisition, collecting data from them, pre-processing the data combining the multiple slave's data into a single data "records" and storing these data records in an 8MB EPROM Array, burning records to EPROMs on-the-fly. This was mid 80's. The non-volatile storage was important due to the severe environment this operated in. Storage was later upgraded in 1991 to eight 8MB PCMCIA EEPROM Flash storage modules. Much smaller, 8 times the data capacity and saved having to erase all those EPROM chips with UV light.

I had left the company in 1990, but they called me back in 1991 as a consultant to re-write the EPROM data storage routines to address the new Flash Memory array. There was some 40,000 lines of assembly code in this system!
There was a time when I could write 6502 assembler by typing in hex opcodes from memory. I didn't feel the need to learn assembly for an Amtel chip, so I took the easy way (and the abstraction layer) and wrote it in C. :)

What you see there is fairly high level - you'll see calls to functions that actually do the down-and-dirty hardware manipulation to make things work. Overall, it consists of roughly 1,800 lines of code, which when compiled (including the bitmaps for the fonts) consists of 4226 bytes. Notice the larger fonts are proportional! That was the only way to get things to fit on the screen. That took a bit of doing.

The processor itself is an 8-bit processor running at 16 MHz. It has 8K RAM, 4K of EEPROM (of which I'm using about 10 bytes), and 128K of Flash (program storage).

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Re: My Bike PC

Post by minimac »

This is all Greek to me. I'm not a nerd or geek or whatever it is nowadays, as I've barely progressed from my Commodore 64, but that's impressive!

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Re: My Bike PC

Post by 2003Cobra »

I can fully understand why you would not want to produce and support something like this, But have you ever considered selling the idea and plans to a company for them to do the dirty work? With today's processors and electronics your idea could really make your computer cool. Plus it could make older bike's function more like the newer bikes with the informant systems.

Watching the video took me back to the old DOS days. I programmed with the 4 gen database languages but I did do some COBOL and "C" projects in my career. I remember having to rewrite code for each project but then the concept of saved code and libraries became popular and frame works were born. That made life a lot easier.
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Re: My Bike PC

Post by Sadanorakman »

WingAdmin wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:55 am

The processor itself is an 8-bit processor running at 16 MHz. It has 8K RAM, 4K of EEPROM (of which I'm using about 10 bytes), and 128K of Flash (program storage).
So about three times the processing power of my First PC Then!: A 1982, Intel 8088 IBM-PC Clone, running at a little under 5Mhz, although it did have a massive 512K of Ram, and a Green-screen 'Hercules' video adapter (and an 8" hard-sectored Floppy Drive, and 20MB MFM hard disk).
Was speaking with my 19yr old son today: he has no idea what 'vertical hold' refers to.

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Re: My Bike PC

Post by Corkster52 »

I am one of the ones that marveled at this gadget at last year's Gathering. Now that I see how complex it is, I will stick with nuts, bolts, screws..etc. Amazing stuff!



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