FR-6 Swingarm Tool


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WingAdmin
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Posts: 19437
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (wife's!)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

FR-6 Swingarm Tool

Post by WingAdmin » Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:34 pm



The swingarm on our Goldwings is fastened into the frame with pivot pins - a couple of large steel pins screw into the frame, and that project into bearings in the swingarm. The swingarm bearings rotate around these smooth pins:


The pivot pins must be fastened very tightly - at a specific torque - into the frame. The left side pin, shown here on the left, simply bolts into the frame and is torqued tightly in place. The right side pin however cannot be torqued too tight, as it will side-load the swingarm bearings, causing them to bind and fail. So it needs to be in the correct position for the bearings, with the correct amount of pressure for the bearings - but it needs to be very tight, so it does not come loose! The way this is accomplished is with a lock ring. The inner part of the pivot is screwed into place using the hex socket part of it. Once the correct torque is applied, it is held in place, while the outer lock ring is tightened in place to a much higher torque, which locks the pin into the frame.


Honda sells a specialized tool that allows you do exactly this - it is a collared tool with teeth that engage this ring, and a hex tool to engage the pin. Honda sells this swingarm tool, which has only one use, for $50. However, there is a cheaper option: Sold by Park Tool, the FR-6 Freewheel Removal Tool can be purchased on Amazon for only $14!

Some people have built their own tools for this purpose out of a socket, grinding away metal to form the "teeth", but this does not allow you to hold the center pin in place while tightening the lock ring - and this is important, to prevent swingarm bearing failure.

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Obviously meant for working on BMX bicycles, this tool fits our swingarms perfectly:

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The business end of the tool has the four notches required to fit into our swingarm pivots:

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The top of the tool has a hex forging to accept a wrench or socket in order to turn the lock ring of the pivot. The center of the tool has a hole through which you can insert the hex wrench, in order to keep the pivot from turning while you tighten the lock ring.

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Here is a perfect example - the swingarm pivot of my wife's Honda PC800, which uses the exact same fastener. You can see the lock ring around the pin, which itself has a hex recess.

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Fitting the teeth of the tool into the lock ring, you can now still insert your hex tool into the pin to hold it tight as the lock ring is tightened.

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Does it work? You bet, and perfectly! And for only $14, you can afford to buy one now and throw it in your toolbox for the next time you need it!



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