DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope


Reviews of Goldwing and motorcycle-related products and services
  • Sponsored Links
Post Reply
User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 20390
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by WingAdmin » Mon May 13, 2019 3:52 pm



After reading Rednaxs60's DSO138 Oscilloscope review I thought, "what a great idea!" I have a huge, 25+ year old digital storage oscilloscope that is a precision instrument. I've in the past hauled it not only to my garage, but to friends' garages to use in order to diagnose problems with our Goldwings. Nothing like balancing a 20-pound delicate oscilloscope on a motorcycle seat while trying to rev a throttle and watch the screen...

These low-cost oscilloscopes are just the ticket: Under $50, you can buy them pre-made, or as a kit. Of the kits, you can buy them with or without the surface-mount devices already soldered to the circuit boards. I decided to buy a kit (they're cheaper), but I bought one with the SMD's already soldered, because, well, soldering surface-mount components just isn't my idea of fun. I can do it, but prefer not to.

The kit I bought was the DSO150, a newer version of the DSO138. My kit had a couple upgrades: it came with a case (many of them come with just a bare circuit board, and leave the enclosure up to you), as well as a rotary encoder knob for changing the settings, which makes it easier than using buttons to move up and down through values or menu settings.

The unit I picked was the JYETech 'DSO Shell' DIY kit. It came with a set of alligator clips, but also came with a 100 MHz probe. I seem to go through probes far too often, and this probe uses a standard BNC connector, so I can use it on my desk scope as well.

It requires a stable 9 volt power supply, and it has multiple warnings about supplying the unit with more than 9 volts. Do not use a standard transformer power supply that supplies 11+ volts when not under load. I bought this 9 volt switching power supply to power the unit. You could also technically use a 9-volt battery to power it.

The online page for the kit shows a very neat set of components, all laid out:





When I received it, I was surprised at how small a box it all came in. What it included was two sets of boards, the case, a bag of components, and four color pages of instructions. Many of the instructions apply to the SMD-soldering version, so I was able to skip almost two of the four pages. The instructions were good...but assume you have some knowledge of electronics and soldering.

Image

Speaking of soldering, you'll need a fine-tipped soldering iron, and some thin solder, as there are several very small items to solder in place on the board.

You will also need a DVM, capable of measuring voltage and resistance. There are quite a few different resistors, and the colors on them are virtually indistinguishable from one another - so you really need to measure their value to confirm you are installing the correct one.

There were also four ceramic capacitors, I measured their values as well with my meter to confirm I was putting the correct one in the correct place.

The larger board with the screen attached is the digital board. It contains the microprocessor, screen driver circuitry, and all of the support circuitry. It has the software loaded on it already, and you are instructed to power it up straight away before beginning to make sure it boots up correctly.

Image

About an hour's worth of soldering and testing, and I had a working oscilloscope. Time to mount it into its case. The case is made of a strange type of plastic - definitely not ABS, and it does not seem injection molded to me. I strongly suspect that it is actually 3D printed, which would make sense for a low-volume production item such as this. The case did not fit perfectly. When assembled, the "trigger" button on the front of the unit was jammed in its hole so that it could not be pressed properly. I ended up drilling the hole for the button slightly larger, which fixed the problem.

Image

The bottom of the unit contains just an on/off switch. On the top is a switch that allows you to measure AC or DC, or couple to ground for calibration. It also includes a test point where a 1 KHz square wave is produced, also used for calibration, and the BNC port for the probe.

Image

Powering it up, and attaching the probe to the test point, a 150 mV square wave is produced, which can be used to make calibration adjustments. These adjustments are covered in the documentation.

Image

Hooking the unit up to my cell phone and playing music showed an audio waveform in real time, as expected.

So what do I think? I'm actually REALLY impressed. The functions and options available rival those in my desktop analog/digital storage scope, and it has a couple functions that weren't even imagined 20 years ago when my scope was made. It's fairly easy to use, and all the tests I have tried on it show it to be quite accurate as well. There are some quirks peculiar to 100% digital scopes, such as quantization noise on flat, unchanging signals, which you won't see on analog scopes. As well, the resolution (10 bits, or 1024 steps) is nowhere near the resolution I can get on my analog scope. That's primarily limited by the resolution of the digital LCD screen, whereas an analog CRT has essentially infinite resolution. However, for diagnostic use on the bike in the garage, this thing is perfect, and I expect I'll be using it often. And you can't beat the price!



Rambozo
Posts: 117
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:36 pm
Location: Disneyland
Motorcycle: 1992 GL1500 Aspencade

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by Rambozo » Mon May 13, 2019 11:38 pm

Nice review. Seems those have improved quite a bit since the early ones in MP3 player cases.
You don't find soldering 0201 SMD resistors without a microscope, fun? :roll:

User avatar
virgilmobile
Posts: 8928
Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:39 pm
Location: Denham Springs,La.
Motorcycle: 1988 GL1500 I
Previously owned
78 GL1000
81 GL1100
82 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 standard
84 GL 1200 I

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by virgilmobile » Tue May 14, 2019 12:20 pm

I think I'll get one too.
When looking at the power requirements being 9 volts,I looked at why..The main regulator could be damaged by a voltage above 12 volts(as most cheap unloaded 12 volt adaptors produce)..Hmmm.
So much for portable having to run a extention cord to a special adaptor and plug it in..I think I'll add a LM 7809 voltage regulator to it..It handles up to 35 volt input and will output the 9 volts for the scope..And I can use any adaptor I have..or even 12 volts from the bike.
I like the specs on the scope too.
No match for the expensive suitcase one I use but it does seem to be a usable tool.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 20390
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by WingAdmin » Tue May 14, 2019 12:34 pm

Rambozo wrote:
Mon May 13, 2019 11:38 pm
Nice review. Seems those have improved quite a bit since the early ones in MP3 player cases.
You don't find soldering 0201 SMD resistors without a microscope, fun? :roll:
I have a stereo microscope that I use to examine solder joints sometimes, but no, soldering SMD components is NOT fun!

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 20390
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by WingAdmin » Tue May 14, 2019 12:35 pm

virgilmobile wrote:
Tue May 14, 2019 12:20 pm
I think I'll get one too.
When looking at the power requirements being 9 volts,I looked at why..The main regulator could be damaged by a voltage above 12 volts(as most cheap unloaded 12 volt adaptors produce)..Hmmm.
So much for portable having to run a extention cord to a special adaptor and plug it in..I think I'll add a LM 7809 voltage regulator to it..It handles up to 35 volt input and will output the 9 volts for the scope..And I can use any adaptor I have..or even 12 volts from the bike.
I like the specs on the scope too.
No match for the expensive suitcase one I use but it does seem to be a usable tool.
Hi Virgil,

I plan to do the exact same thing for the same reason - I just didn't have any 7809's on hand when I built it.

User avatar
virgilmobile
Posts: 8928
Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:39 pm
Location: Denham Springs,La.
Motorcycle: 1988 GL1500 I
Previously owned
78 GL1000
81 GL1100
82 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 standard
84 GL 1200 I

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by virgilmobile » Tue May 14, 2019 1:27 pm

What???No 7809 regulators in the junk drawer?
Sounds like a Digikey order coming on :lol:
Soldering small parts forces you to relax.Kinda like getting ready to squeeze the trigger on a precision shot.

PC board repair.
PC board repair.


User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 20390
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by WingAdmin » Tue May 14, 2019 2:42 pm

virgilmobile wrote:
Tue May 14, 2019 1:27 pm
What???No 7809 regulators in the junk drawer?
Sounds like a Digikey order coming on :lol:
Soldering small parts forces you to relax.Kinda like getting ready to squeeze the trigger on a precision shot.

IMG_20190514_131234.jpg
I almost considered using a 7805 with a resistor on the ground lead, but couldn't be arsed to do the math to figure out the resistor value, and figured I needed to get some 7809's anyway.

Mouser is cheaper for regulators than Digikey, btw. :)

User avatar
Mh434
Posts: 1496
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2014 10:24 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1997 gl1500 SE
Previous:
1981 GL1100I
1989 Kawasaki Concours

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by Mh434 » Tue May 14, 2019 5:02 pm

Okay, you guys - could you speak ENGLISH?? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

User avatar
AZgl1800
Posts: 1760
Joined: Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:46 pm
Location: Lake Oologah Indian Territory USA
Motorcycle: '02 GL1800

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by AZgl1800 » Tue May 14, 2019 8:30 pm

Mh434 wrote:
Tue May 14, 2019 5:02 pm
Okay, you guys - could you speak ENGLISH?? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
with my tunge tied, I speaka da Anglish.... :lol:
~John
What is the Forum Index?
http://bit.ly/2GnjbzV

Download it here:
http://bit.ly/2SLDNqF

User avatar
DenverWinger
Posts: 976
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:20 pm
Location: Denver, CO
Motorcycle: (s)
1980 GL1100 STD Vetter (2005-)
1993 GL1500 Aspencade (2017-)
1983 Trav-Lite Camper (2010-)
Past rides
1972 CL350 (1980-1988) sold
1978 Suzuki GS550 (1985-2005) sold
1977 GL1000 (2002-2006) sold

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by DenverWinger » Tue May 14, 2019 9:36 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
Tue May 14, 2019 2:42 pm
virgilmobile wrote:
Tue May 14, 2019 1:27 pm
What???No 7809 regulators in the junk drawer?
Sounds like a Digikey order coming on :lol:
Soldering small parts forces you to relax.Kinda like getting ready to squeeze the trigger on a precision shot.

IMG_20190514_131234.jpg
I almost considered using a 7805 with a resistor on the ground lead, but couldn't be arsed to do the math to figure out the resistor value, and figured I needed to get some 7809's anyway.

Mouser is cheaper for regulators than Digikey, btw. :)
Surely you must have some 7909's lying around, they could always be used in a positive-ground configuration.... :lol:
♫ 99 Little Bugs in the Code, ♪
♪ 99 Bugs in the Code. ♫ :(
♫ Take one down, Patch it around, ♪
♫ 127 Little Bugs in the Code. ♫ ♪ :shock:

~Mark

User avatar
virgilmobile
Posts: 8928
Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:39 pm
Location: Denham Springs,La.
Motorcycle: 1988 GL1500 I
Previously owned
78 GL1000
81 GL1100
82 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 standard
84 GL 1200 I

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by virgilmobile » Wed May 15, 2019 3:27 pm

We are speaking English..It's just with a accent.
I'd call it "Electronicish".
I have a hard time with "Lawyerish..Spanish..Cajunish..." Just to name a few..I use hand and finger jestures to get my point across when necessary :oops:

rpotthoff
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu May 05, 2016 11:35 am
Location: Montgomery, IL.
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by rpotthoff » Mon Jul 01, 2019 6:40 am

Could this be used to check the sparkplugs?

User avatar
virgilmobile
Posts: 8928
Joined: Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:39 pm
Location: Denham Springs,La.
Motorcycle: 1988 GL1500 I
Previously owned
78 GL1000
81 GL1100
82 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 I
83 GL1100 standard
84 GL 1200 I

Re: DSO150 Digital Oscilloscope

Post by virgilmobile » Mon Jul 01, 2019 7:06 am

I suppose a induction coil could be made to fit around the spark plug wire.With enough math calculation one might be able to determine the wire size,number of turns and diameter to provide a readable voltage Spike to the scope.

It's one method to isolate a weak spark.
I used to have one for automotive use many years ago.The scope display was referenced to 100 kv.
Nowdays I just listen to the snap when I lift the plug wire a half inch off the plug.
Maybe a old clamp pickup coil from a electronic strobe light may work.
Calibration is the hard part.



Post Reply