trailer size


Information, ideas, experiences and help with camping, pulling a trailer and roughing it on your Goldwing
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fred1diver
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trailer size

Post by fred1diver » Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:08 am



what size trailer would you say is good to tow behind a wing?
I'm looking at a 4x3 trailer for a real sweet price, but just worried it might be too big, should I get it or pass on it?



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Mh434
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Re: trailer size

Post by Mh434 » Sat Aug 26, 2017 5:57 pm

I'd say the more important considerations, in order, would be weight, intended use, wheel size, suspension type, and tongue length (reach).

My Lugg & Roll (cargo) trailer is about 4' X 6', and it's certainly not too big for my GL1500 to handle...but it doesn't weigh much (150 lbs complete). It has 12" alloy wheels, streamlined fiberglass box, torsion bar suspension, all-LED lighting, and was specifically designed for towing behind motorcycles.

Wheel size is important, IMHO. Those teensy little 8" wheels (and tiny little bearings) are REALLY spinning fast at interstate speeds, and are best suited for yard implements, whereas the 12" wheels (and tires) are designed for highway use & higher sustained speeds.

In a cargo trailer, the weight of the unit itself is the most important factor. Your bike can only haul so much (and your brakes can only stop so much), so the lighter the trailer is the better, and the greater the proportion of the gross weight that can be loaded into it.

Certainly, the size of trailer you're looking at SHOULD be very light and, assuming that's the case, it should be well-suited to towing behind your bike.

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Re: trailer size

Post by dingdong » Sun Aug 27, 2017 8:20 am

A picture would be nice. That size isn't to large. Weight is more important. My personal experience is owning two trailers since the 80s. Both with 8 in. wheels and a combined mileage of around 100k miles. I have never had a problem with over heating hubs and bearings. The tires have lasted appx. 20k miles. This includes sustained highway speeds of up to 85 mph. So if the trailer you are looking at has 8in. wheels don't hesitate to buy it. Just my personal experience.
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fred1diver
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Re: trailer size

Post by fred1diver » Sun Aug 27, 2017 8:29 am

I don'T know how to add photos but the trailer is basically a platform on 10 or 12" wheels
I'd put a car topper on it and it needs lights (I'd install leds)

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Mh434
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Re: trailer size

Post by Mh434 » Sun Aug 27, 2017 8:50 am

Well, that ought to work just fine.

My concern for the smaller wheels was more for the bearings than the tires themselves - with proper maintenance, even the smaller ones will work for a long time, but they are more highly stressed than the larger ones, so extra vigilance is called for.

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Re: trailer size

Post by offcenter » Sun Aug 27, 2017 1:45 pm

My home built trailer has the smaller wheels and has given me no problems in over 6000 miles of travel. This includes many miles at 60 or 70 miles per hour.
My personal concern is the weight of the trailer, specifically, stopping the thing in a hurry. Having built my own trailer and pulled it all over New England and eastern Canada. I've decided that the trailer should weigh NO MORE than half of what the empty bike weighs. I pulled my trailer with a 500 pound BMW. The loaded trailer weighed in right at 250 pounds. I felt that this was as heavy as I'd want to pull, or STOP, with that bike.
A heavier bike like a big Goldwing should be able to pull, and stop, more weight.
If you have trailer brakes, all the better. But I'd still want to limit the weight of the thing.
Just my two cents.
George in Jersey.
99 Goldwing GL-1500 SE
76 Goldwing Gl-1000
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Mh434
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Re: trailer size

Post by Mh434 » Sun Aug 27, 2017 10:49 pm

^^^Good points, all!

In most jurisdictions, a trailer must NOT weigh more than 50% of the weight of the towing vehicle unless it's equipped with its own braking system - generally, they're electric brakes on a motorcycle trailer, as "surge brakes" are...uh...inadvisable when combined with a lightweight towing vehicle like a bike, as they can lock up at inopportune times...and having your trailer pass you on the freeway would be "sub-optimal".

Adding brakes to a trailer isn't impossible, but it is complex, and can lead to difficulties. IMHO, it's better to keep the trailer weight well down so as to avoid this. On a GL1500, this limits the all-up, loaded trailer weight to around the 400 lb. mark. My Lugg & Roll trailer, at 150 lbs., allows me to carry up to 250 lbs. of cargo in it & safely be well under the 50% of towing vehicle mark. That said, there's no way I'll ever load more than, say, 100 lbs. in it.

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Re: trailer size

Post by themainviking » Mon Aug 28, 2017 6:15 am

Mh434 wrote:
Sun Aug 27, 2017 10:49 pm
there's no way I'll ever load more than, say, 100 lbs. in it.
Ha, ha, ha. Yeah, better get that weighed before and after. Your spare, if you carry one will put a big dent in that 100 pounds. Then if you take a tent, bedding, a stove to cook on and any cookware, and do not forget the cooler if you carry one. This will put you between the 100 and your max of 250. I have packed and weighed and I was amazed at what weight of stuff I was taking. If you carry any water, you will sure not be under the 100. My cargo trailer weighs in at just 132, being all aluminum, but the tires/wheels are 12". My spare weighs 33 pounds. I weighed it after I loaded it with all the stuff I needed, with an empty cooler cause I can buy ice anyplace, and I came in just at 298, and that was really lightly packed. Room in the trailer for another 300 pounds if I wanted to put it. I figured it down to this. If my gear was light enough to be only a hundred pounds, I could probably fit in in or on my bike. Backpacking gear would be that weight.

On bearings. I have a tent trailer, of the Lee-shur Lite variety, with 8" wheels. I have repacked both those bearings, and the bearings on my cargo trailer with 12" wheels, and in fact, because they both came with chinese bearings, I have replaced both sets, and kept the chinese ones as road spares. They are the same Timken bearings in each trailer. Yes, the 8" wheels turn more times per mile at a faster rate, but if the bearings have grease in them, they should take it.
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Mh434
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Re: trailer size

Post by Mh434 » Mon Aug 28, 2017 11:24 am

In our case, we don't carry a spare (the tires have a load rating of 780 lbs. each, far exceeding the trailer & load weight, and they're brand new, so I don't bother carrying a spare), and we *never* camp (my wife insists on hotel stays only!), so packing for the trailer is limited to clothes, sandals, etc. When we go to the Caribbean for two weeks every year, we take absolutely everything we could possibly want (including snorkel gear, laptop, cameras, etc.) and we've never gone over 60 lbs. (confirmed weight), so keeping to 100 lbs. in the trailer isn't a problem.

Mind you, due to work etc., we will likely never get to spend over 2 weeks on the road. If we were going for much longer, that would likely change, at least a little.

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DenverWinger
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Re: trailer size

Post by DenverWinger » Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:40 am

I got ten days off!

We're going, First road trip on my new-2-me '93 Aspencade!

Trailer is 350 LBS empty, and probably 500+ loaded. It has a long tongue, so bike doesn't really notice.

Same 8" wheels, pack the wheel bearings really well and it does fine even at 80MPH. Tires are important, Esp if pulling with bike. I just bought a new spare, old one was toast! Spare bolted to tongue, have to have it, that's what we bungee the barbeque grill to!

On the Aspencade, new rear tire (E4), Rear brakes are good, new timing belts, new coolant, front tire almost new (E3), changed cornering lights to 50 watt LED (cut ground so always on), new front brake pads (Today - OEM - bought them from local dealer ($105 both rotors) 'cause had them in stock, Cyclemax $20 less, but wouldn't get them in time). Oil hasn't budged one iota on the dipstick since I drove her home 3000 miles ago (PO used Shell Rotella T6, he said it was new oil change), but I'll freshen up the oil this winter.

Bought the 1500 this March with 44K MI, she runs like an absolute dream.

My 1980 GL 1100 STD is Jealous! She's pulled the camper three times cross-country.

Trailer hitch is one of the first accessories I installed on the 1500.

Relay driven trailer light kit (Two Flat 4 connectors, first is L/R Brake/Driving lite for the bike(If I put the camper on my Jeep I use first flat four only, relay kit in the jeep blinks the brake lites with the turn sigs-a relay driven converter) second flat 4 connector used for only the bike is L/R Turn signal connected to amber 1156 bulb fixtures added to back of trailer plus fused 10 amp connection feeding 12V power from bike battery to trailer with large marine-type 110AH deep-cycle battery in trailer. This allows 90 Amp alternator on bike to charge the deep-cycle while driving, current-limited due to long wiring connection to bike battery, disconnected from bike I can run the deep-cycle battery down and the bike will still start in the morning. I carry a DC/AC Inverter to use Laptop computer, Patio lights, even an electric blanket if cold overnight. AC powered air pump for full-size air mattress also sucks down the Harbor-Freight Vacuum bags for the bedding and pillows (makes them nice and small). In the morning, start the bike, connect the trailer, and you recharge the deep-cycle battery going down the road......

Going from Denver to Michigan. Dad turns 91 yrs in Sept (I'm 59) so not many years left....

Last road trip to Michigan (been elsewhere since) with camper (2012) on the "Oldwing" 1100 we took the Interstate Hwy all the way to Michigan, (I-76, I-80, I-94) and I must say the 1100 didn't complain even one bit about pulling the trailer at 80MPH in E Colorado in 100+ degree temperature! AVG MPG 27. Returned via 2 lane roads, taking our time for 5 days, US 127 South from Michigan to Ohio, where we caught US 24 all the way to Limon Colorado, and then I-70 home. AVG MPG 32, and AVG daytime high temp 104+!!!! 2012 was really HOT!

This weekend leaving Colorado with camper on the 1500, I-76 to Ft Morgan CO, get onto US-34 to Osceola IA, N on I-35 thru DesMoines IA to short piece of I-80 where we get off onto US-65 (IA-330) until US-30 Junction W of Marshalltown IA. Follow US-30 to Cedar Rapids IA and find our way onto US-151 all the way to Manitowac WI.

This will be the fun part, in Manitowac WI drive the bike and camper onto the "SS Badger" and enjoy a four hour "ocean" trip across Lake Michigan to Ludington MI. Link to SS Badger. Biker-Friendly, check out the bike photos on their site.

http://www.ssbadger.com/schedule-fares/ ... icles.html

From Ludington MI Follow US-10 to US 31, go north to Traverse City MI then E on M-72 'til we get to Dad's cabin at Bear Lake. A couple days there, then M-72 to US-127 South to Jackson MI, a couple days camping at Portage Lake State park, then back home to Denver via direct Interstate hwy.
Attachments

Oldwing and Camper
Oldwing and Camper




Indiana - Illinois state line, Barbeque on spare tire
Indiana - Illinois state line, Barbeque on spare tire


Jeep Camping Arapahoe Nat'l Forest
Jeep Camping Arapahoe Nat'l Forest


Enough room for full size air mattress (photo from PO)
Enough room for full size air mattress (photo from PO)


Or You can set up the table in the rain (photo from PO)
Or You can set up the table in the rain (photo from PO)

They say 98% of all Hardleys ever made are still on the road..... The other 2% made it home. :lol:
(I stole this from somebody on another GW site...) :roll:

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Re: trailer size

Post by GlimWas » Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:16 am

I would make that Harleys, if i were you .............
Over here in the EU, we have different laws in just about every country. In the Netherlands i can tow a trailer 2 m wide with a max length of 2.5 m from the rear axle.
That includes the tongue....... In Germany it's 1 m width and the same length, with a max speed of 60 kph! That includes the Autobahn! In Spain you only can drive with a trailer during daylight hours. I try to keep my trailer under 200 kgs of weight, with an own weight of 50 kgs. Made quite a few kms with th trailer by now(approx. 10000km)
The only thing i'd like is brakes on the trailer, but that is the next project.
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MiWinger51
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Re: trailer size

Post by MiWinger51 » Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:42 am

GlimWas wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:16 am
I would make that Harleys, if i were you .............
Over here in the EU, we have different laws in just about every country. In the Netherlands i can tow a trailer 2 m wide with a max length of 2.5 m from the rear axle.
That includes the tongue....... In Germany it's 1 m width and the same length, with a max speed of 60 kph! That includes the Autobahn! In Spain you only can drive with a trailer during daylight hours. I try to keep my trailer under 200 kgs of weight, with an own weight of 50 kgs. Made quite a few kms with th trailer by now(approx. 10000km)
The only thing i'd like is brakes on the trailer, but that is the next project.
Why in the world do the Europeans put up with such nonsense? I can't imagine each state putting restrictions on trailer width and length. What do you do if you are on a tour and have to cross a country where the trailer that is legal in your home country becomes illegal in your host country? You can't very well leave it at the border.
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Re: trailer size

Post by jamocall » Fri Sep 01, 2017 5:31 am

Hi,
my wife and I toured America last year on a Goldwing 1800 we purchased on-line before we left Australia.
Two weeks into our trip we came across a trailer that suited us well - a Time Out Deluxe camper trailer. In it (and the panniers/boot) was our worldly possessions, everything we needed for our adventure. We carried all our clothes, bedding, cooking utensils, electrical gear and food. I must admit the Wing performed beautifully towing this weight about. Not a beat did it miss!
In our nine months in America, we covered 40,000 kilometres pulling the trailer without any hassles.
We enjoyed the trailer so much, we brought it home to Oz. I now have a Kawasaki Vulcan Nomad (1700cc) to pull the trailer along for our next adventure.

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GlimWas
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Re: trailer size

Post by GlimWas » Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:12 am

wireguy51 wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 4:42 am
GlimWas wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:16 am
I would make that Harleys, if i were you .............
Over here in the EU, we have different laws in just about every country. In the Netherlands i can tow a trailer 2 m wide with a max length of 2.5 m from the rear axle.
That includes the tongue....... In Germany it's 1 m width and the same length, with a max speed of 60 kph! That includes the Autobahn! In Spain you only can drive with a trailer during daylight hours. I try to keep my trailer under 200 kgs of weight, with an own weight of 50 kgs. Made quite a few kms with th trailer by now(approx. 10000km)
The only thing i'd like is brakes on the trailer, but that is the next project.
Why in the world do the Europeans put up with such nonsense? I can't imagine each state putting restrictions on trailer width and length. What do you do if you are on a tour and have to cross a country where the trailer that is legal in your home country becomes illegal in your host country? You can't very well leave it at the border.
Well, we are all Europeans but we do live in different countries. Not much of a united bunch of states, just economically. So these laws will change over time, but that will take longer as my riding days i fear............We just got free roaming the internet with our cellphones last june! Two world wars are not that easily forgotten, let alone the many centuries of warfare before that................ But wer'e getting there, maybe...................
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fred1diver
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Re: trailer size

Post by fred1diver » Fri Sep 01, 2017 11:40 am

ok, so I've settled on an old BMW trailer, it's about 3 ½ x 4, now I just need to install the hitch on the wing

Charlie Victor
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Re: trailer size

Post by Charlie Victor » Fri Sep 01, 2017 5:35 pm

GlimWas wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:12 am
...

Well, we are all Europeans but we do live in different countries. Not much of a united bunch of states, just economically. So these laws will change over time, but that will take longer as my riding days i fear............We just got free roaming the internet with our cellphones last june! Two world wars are not that easily forgotten, let alone the many centuries of warfare before that................ But wer'e getting there, maybe...................
GW's tagline (*) says it all... not only economically some European states that are part of the European Union treaty are nose-to-nose. I won't start a lengthy and certainly never-ending hot debate here, but as an example I only mention them stubborn Brits have opted out by only a fractional majority (and now that the immensely huge -not only financial- consequences are dawning on them, quite a few of their fooliticians seem surprised there's no easy reverse in the gearbox of treaty conditions... ' cause hey, treaties is how you control people these days, right?)

Some clarification (?) for our US readers: Europe is a continent and landwise attached to continent Asia to form the by far largest landmass of planet Earth. (Surprise! there's more than just Northern America)
Anyway, we, the Europeans, share this part of the world divided by over 50 land and sea borders which separate the nations and regions of Europe. Some of these national borders, especially in South-East regions, are under -locally hot- debate. Which is, by the way, equally true for a growing number of regional borders... (Are you still with me? We were talking European integration, right?) These borders are formed during several thousands of years of habitation, not only by language, dialect and belief but also by -what's new to mankind- war over control and ego - and, to add complexity, over the previously mentioned language, dialect and belief as well. None of these borders (that I know of) on land are straight for more that an few hour's walk, by the way. Oh, and enclaves are invented in this part of the world...

Back to the European Union: consisting of "only" 28 of the European nations so far, it is a fairly recent and peaceful (no military enforcement, at least) development in this history. Although, some claim emperor Charles V could very well be the EU's first visionary who dreamt about peace and prosperity for all. Indeed for a relatively brief stretch in time he actually united a large part of the ruling families and of the western regions under one (although military enforced) administration.

As for me, I think it is highly unlikely that I will live to see the "United States of Europe" that some envision - and under current conditions have no desire to see that either, but that's just my personal opinion. Although, I somehow do take pride in being a citizen of the region that is commonly identified as the first working example of institutional cooperations: water boards.

For trivia: geophysically, in the 7-continent model that is commonly used, Russia is part of both continents Europe and Asia. Hence Russians are part of us, although lately (somehow coincides with Putin gaining popularity) they try to impose their viewpoint on us that we are part of them but we are yet too stubborn to understand or even admit that.
More trivia: surprisingly or not, history's greatest philosophers are a product of Europe and their viewpoints helped shape Europe (and the USA!) as it is today, while sadly enough the greatest errors of mankind impacting mankind itself also root in Europe (nazism, Darwinism, to name but a few - the list goes on).

[writer's note: this went waaay off-topic, but by now I put in so much typing that I leave it as-is for the mods to decide...]

(*) Nulli cedo - GI's never give in! 8-)

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northerndrifter
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Re: trailer size

Post by northerndrifter » Sat Sep 02, 2017 5:55 am

I'm on my third trailer now. I've home built each one and never had a a hassle in over 40 years or riding.
My only concerns were physical height and width, I stuck to the 3 1/2 X 5 rule and it has worked well all these years.
I have never actually weighed my loaded trailers by themselves, but the only advice I can offer is to make sure that when you buy or build, make sure the tongue length is correct.
On a car this isn't critical, but on a bike it can be catastrophic. Too short a tongue and the trailer will start to shimmy above about 20 mph. and throw the bike into a nearly unrecoverable shake similar to worn out neck bearings and a high speed wobble. The proper ratio is 1 1/2 times the width from backing plate to backing plate. In other words, if your wheels are 36 inches apart from hub to hub your tongue length from axle to coupler MUST BE at least 51 inches, I have always welded the tong so that the edge of it pulls from the axle and not from the front of the frame. Longer if you like but no shorter. Make sure you measure this even on commercially built trailers. some manufacturers cheat by moving the suspension back from center, while attaching the tongue to the front of the frame and that' ok, if you're pulling it with a car. I wish I knew how to attach pictures so i could show you what I mean. good luck whichever way you decide to go.

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Re: trailer size

Post by sleepy2 » Sun Sep 03, 2017 7:27 am

I have a 2012 Royal Star Venture(joined here so I can help my brother-in-law with his 2000 1500 Gold Wing) and I have driven it with a 600 lb 2 man tent trailer to Illinois and back with no trouble at all. Just have to be VERY aware of surrounding traffic and terrain(hills etc.) I have built a few trailers mostly a frame with a car-top carrier on it. I now have a Time Out tent trailer at 250lbs empty then have everything loaded that I need for trips.
My brother-in-law has hauled an emptied out tent trailer to Pennsylvania and the Finger lakes area in New York State with no problems.

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Re: trailer size

Post by captdecker » Mon Sep 04, 2017 10:25 pm

I have Kimp Kamp popup camping trailer now, as I got tried of sleeping on the ground. Before that I used (still have) Escapade trailer by California Sidecar.

I've not seen anyone talk about air pressure , I was wearing out the center of the tires. Called California Sidecar they asked me what PSI I was running told them Psi on tire...that's your trouble, to little weight to hold tire flat. They say to run about 20-25 PSI ..no more fast wearing out. So lite one use lower pressure.

I like my popup most of the comforts of home expect hot water. :-)

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Re: trailer size

Post by FM-USA » Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:28 am

fred1diver wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 9:08 am
what size trailer would you say is good to tow behind a wing?
I'm looking at a 4x3 trailer for a real sweet price, but just worried it might be too big, should I get it or pass on it?
Being that your in Canada, which HIGHLY restricts your freedom of choice(s), that 3x4 ft? trailer will suffice you well.
To the normal trailer hauling cycle rider, that's a fair size trailer. Think of what the longest/largest item you need to load. Don't fit inside you say? Maybe a roof rack on top of the trailer? Those big items are usually temporary.
Also, adding a longer tongue, EZ to do, will add large cooler size space.
If possible, raising the box above the trailer, say wood 2x6 on edge, adds space.

Balance the loads weight both fore & aft as well as port & starboard. Keeping in mind the 15% to 20% tongue weight. I once had my trailers right wheel bouncing at a certain speed. Took a while to fig'r that one out cause I know the wheels were in balance. I looked inside and the big tent shifted to the left making the right wheel light.

JUST for say... heavy liquid weight should centered as possible over the trailers axle. Then the next lighter items away from there.

JUST offering ideas. RUN WITH'M. ;)
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Re: trailer size

Post by Ravyn » Sun Oct 01, 2017 11:37 am

Well I have pulled my Kwik kamp trailer with a 1993 aspencade for many miles, 170,000. I have an older Kwik Kamp with the canvas tent. Along the way some where I changed the under carriage to a small flat bed trailer from Harbor Freight as the old torsion suspension was giving me a lot of trouble. The whole fiber glass trailer and tent assembly sat right down on the Harbor Freight trailer "almost" like it was made for it. It has the 8" wheels just like the kwik Kamp had.
The trailer and tent assembly weigh in at 400 lbs and when loaded and with the cooler full it is about 600 lbs. At no time did I ever feel like this was to much weight. Those 8" wheels and Chinese bearings never gave me any problems. BTW, i'm not positive but I think those Timken bearings are now being made in China" When I have to take a freeway I drive at freeway speeds. I sold the 1993 gl and bought a gl1800 "big mistake" however it pulls the trailer just as good as the 1500 did. I just bought a 1994 gl1500 se with a calif. side car friendship 3. As soon as I have a trailer hitch for it then I will pulling the Kwik Kamp as well. Most of the time I am riding two up with my beautiful sensitive life partner. "I get points for talking like that, hehehe" I just drove this rig from St. Louis to Vancouver,Wa. and took a couple of weeks doing it, a little over 3,000 miles. The SE hardly knows the side car is there.
As far as tire pressure goes I have found that at about 600 lbs of weight 30 psi is about right. I use the chalk line method to determine my psi settings. And some one in here mentioned that they don't carry a spare because they go lite......ahhhhhh.......what has weight got to do with it? What if you have a blow out and shred that tire before you get stopped? You AIN'T gonna be able to plug that. You better hope you are in cell phone coverge area cause you gonna be sittin there for a while. I M O, that just isn't the smartest thing to do being that a spare doesn't weigh that much. And you already said you were traveling lite.

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Re: trailer size

Post by AZgl1800 » Sun Oct 01, 2017 12:20 pm

Mh434 wrote:
Sat Aug 26, 2017 5:57 pm


Wheel size is important, IMHO. Those teensy little 8" wheels (and tiny little bearings) are REALLY spinning fast at interstate speeds, and are best suited for yard implements, whereas the 12" wheels (and tires) are designed for highway use & higher sustained speeds.
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Not to be argumentative, but 8" wheels are NOT dangerous, and they do NOT spin too fast. I once did the RPM calculations and while we think they are spinning up too fast, they really aren't, and that goes for the wheel bearings in the 8" wheels also.

I pull my trailer at the Speed Limit plus 3 mph and at times have pulled it at up to 105 mph while passing two Freightliners that I did not enjoy following for miles and miles of double yellow... the trailer did not whimper a bit. It does have an extended length added on to it, in the form of a Swivel Hitch.


I carry an IR Temp gun, and at every stop I take temperature readings on my trailer and bike's tires and hub temps.

Result? The average for the hubs is 115* for both the trailer and the bike, and I once shot the wheel/hub temps on a Harley Davidson who parked at the same time I did for gas.... his wheels and tires were within 2* of what mine were... 115* on the hubs, and the tires were slightly cooler than mine by about 2*.

I am running 5.80x8" tires on my trailer, and have pulled it well over 5,000 miles in the last two years with nary a single problem.

It started life as a HF project and the PO mangled the axle.... I replaced it with a custom made axle to the trailer's specific dimensions, and the builder included a Zerk for the wheel bearings as a part of that axle kit. Well worth it IMO... only cost me $10 bux to have that option.

So, don't be concerned about the 8" tires, except that they be in very good condition and of recent manufacture.... IF, your trailer will accept the slightly larger profile, look into replacing the 4.80x8 tires/wheels with the larger profile 5.80x8 setup.... those are speed rated for highway service....


As you can see in my avatar, my trailer is a Plywood Box, not very aerodynamic, but I cannot feel it at all behind my 1800.... I have to look in the mirrors to make sure it is still there.
~John

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Re: trailer size

Post by WingAdmin » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:19 pm

I've got my Aspen Sentry, which is not much more than a box shape when it's being towed, and I can definitely feel it back there in terms of wind resistance, particularly at highway speeds. My mileage reflects that as well.

I've thought about building some kind of fairing for the front, to try to make it a bit more aerodynamic, but it would have to be relatively light as well. Perhaps I could use something along these lines:

https://www.amazon.com/Dee-Zee-DZ91717P ... ingdocs-20





Gives a little more storage (for light things) up front, and helps push the air out and around the trailer, instead of it impacting the flat front surface of the trailer.



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