Thanks Goldwingdocs!!!


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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91Veteran
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu Aug 10, 2017 8:53 pm
Location: Grand Junction, CO
Motorcycle: 1983 Goldwing

Thanks Goldwingdocs!!!

Post by 91Veteran »



A few years ago I had knee replacement surgery, so my Goldwing sat in the shed for over a year. I decided to get it out and clean it up and found the mice got into it. After cleaning that up and perusing the forums here, I decided to repair a few things before riding it again. I had time since my knee recovery was slow.

Thanks to Goldwingdocs, I rebuilt the starter without having to remove the engine, rebuilt the carbs and synced them, cleaned the front brake cylinder, replaced both throttle cables, rebuilt the rear master cylinder, and replaced brakes all around and bled them.

I found large syringes were working well for lots of things...adding brake fluid, removing brake fluid, adding coolant, adding gas to the carbs on the bench to check the floats and using for vacuum for bleeding brakes.

Carbs - After cleaning the mice up, I found they had droppings all the way down into the carb, so I decided to rebuild it with a kit from Randakks. The instructions were great, and after putting in new jets, adjusting the pilot screws and setting the floats, I put it on and tried using the instructions here for syncing. No matter what I did, I could not get the bike to run well. I took the carbs out and checked everything again, but this time I checked the floats according to the comment here on setting floats by measuring the amount of gas drained out of the bowl. I found 2 floats off quite a bit. I then looked at the instructions on syncing again and decided to try something a little different. I had the Harbor Freight gauge, but I couldn't get the setting close enough to my liking. I understood the purpose of syncing was to get each butterfly as close to the same position as possible. I cut a zip tie in half and inserted that into the opened butterfly for #3, then set the butterfly to where it just touched the zip tie matching #1. When I did the same for 2 and 4, I found 2 was a ways off from 4. After setting 2 and 4 I checked 1 and 3 with the zip ties and adjusted. I put the carbs on the bike and before even checking them with the gauge, the bike ran smoother than ever. I checked them with the gauge and found 2 and 4 matched, and within 2psi of 1 and 3.

Starter - The instructions for removing and rebuilding the starter were easy. I found where the recommended procedure was to remove the engine and thought I would have to live with it until I found the instructions here. It took maybe an hour to remove the starter, rebuild it and put it back in. It cranked over much better than I ever expected.

Throttle cables - During one of the carb installations, I found the push throttle cable tight, so I pulled it out and found it was actually seized. I tried loosening it, but found it was too far gone to fiddle with, so I decided to replace both of them. Using the instructions here for doing so made it very easy.

Front brake cylinder - The instructions here are very good for taking things apart and cleaning, which mine certainly needed. I do need to find a source for the O-ring under the reservoir since mine seems to leak after putting it back on. I really should find a replacement reservoir as well since mine is the original plastic and is warped a little on the side. Bleeding the front left brake was a breeze after replacing the pads.

Rear Master Cylinder rebuild - Since I was waiting on other parts and I had the parts on hand for rebuilding the rear master cylinder, I decided just to do it rather than continue to ignore it. Getting things apart is actually easier than it looks reading the instructions. Mine was actually rather clean, so I got the master cylinder apart and rebuilt fairly easily. After putting everything together I was able to bleed the rear brake fairly easy, but bleeding the front right was impossible. My syringe wasn't working, so I got a Mighty-Vac after the recommendations here, and still couldn't get the front brake bled. I blew air through the lines from the rear, so I knew the line was not plugged. After several more tries, I found an air lock right at the banjo bolt, but they still were not bleeding properly. I took the calipers off again and found one of the pistons was not working as it should, and suspected gunk had gotten into an internal channel somewhere, so I decided to take it apart and cleaning it up. Threading a grease zirque into the caliper was an incredibly easy way to get the pistons out. I have rebuilt calipers before and used air to force them out, but will always use a grease zirque from now on. It's messy, but way easier. After getting them both out and everything cleaned up, the front brake bled much easier. If everything is clean and working as it should, a large syringe should work as easy as a Mighty-Vac.

Thanks again Goldwing docs and all commenting here. After 2 years of repairs as I could get to them, I took a ride today. It's great to ride again!


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WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 22241
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Thanks Goldwingdocs!!!

Post by WingAdmin »

This is by far my favorite kind of message to read here. When I started this site, the whole idea was to be able to create a place filled with information that the average person could use to help fix their own bikes, and keep these great bikes running. You're a perfect example of the success stories that I hoped would result.

Enjoy your new-again ride!
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Hoosier Jack
Posts: 419
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 4:21 am
Location: Terre Haute, IN
Motorcycle: 1982 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Thanks Goldwingdocs!!!

Post by Hoosier Jack »

Well Wing Admin I'm going to make you feel even better. The tutorials are absolutely top notch; as good as any on the Internet, any subject. The conversation is adult and very helpful. The posts are easy to read and easy to post to with pictures. I rarely use the search feature so I can't comment on that.

Well run site and I'm glad I found it.
91Veteran
Posts: 10
Joined: Thu Aug 10, 2017 8:53 pm
Location: Grand Junction, CO
Motorcycle: 1983 Goldwing

Re: Thanks Goldwingdocs!!!

Post by 91Veteran »

I will agree Hoosier Jack. I rebuilt a VW 1600 engine last year based on 4 Youtube videos and a couple of manuals and had many questions to research.

Every one of the things I did above were based on these tutorials without ever having to ask questions to get things done. What I liked about these are that if there were any questions from the commenters, whoever wrote the tutorial followed up and corrected what needed to be corrected.

I guess if I had any question, it would be whether to adjust the pilot screws after setting them initially. It runs smooth enough, I don't know if I should mess with them, or why I should mess with them.
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Rednaxs60
Posts: 2584
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
2014 Can-Am Spyder RT LE
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition (sold)
2012 Suzuki DL1000 VStrom (sold)
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Thanks Goldwingdocs!!!

Post by Rednaxs60 »

Great story and accolades. This as well as the other forums are here for us and provide the hands on expertise that is needed to supplement the various manuals. WingAdmin has done a fantastic job of detailing his work for us to follow. The amount of time to detail as thoroughly as WingAdmin is considerable and is not without a good amount of discipline. Other forum members have also been as gracious with their work and projects. Keeping these older gems on the road without the input from this and other forums would be much more difficult.

Thanks to all, enjoy your ride.

Cheers


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest
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