Progressive springs


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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GLnewbie
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:54 pm
Location: Fishkill ny
Motorcycle: 1983 GL11OO

Progressive springs

Post by GLnewbie »



Currently changing my front springs to progressive on my 83 gl1100 and I have a question I can't seem to find the answer to. Do I need to pull the a and b springs or just the b.


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Overdog
Posts: 318
Joined: Sat Oct 12, 2013 7:00 am
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Motorcycle: 83 Goldwing Interstate

Re: Progressive springs

Post by Overdog »

The progressive springs are a single spring for each side....the factory springs are two springs per side....pull them both. When I did my 83 I found that the oil was nothing more than a grey sludge...probably still the original oil. I used diesel fuel to clean them out before i put in the new ATF. You can make a tool to help put the caps back on but it's possible to put them on without one...with the springs OUT start to screw the caps on and make note of where the threads begin to catch. It will make it easier to start them under spring pressure..
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Hoosier Jack
Posts: 419
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 4:21 am
Location: Terre Haute, IN
Motorcycle: 1982 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Progressive springs

Post by Hoosier Jack »

Overdog has a point about putting those caps back on. I pretty much lost my religion putting mine back together after putting in the new progressives.
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WingAdmin
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Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Progressive springs

Post by WingAdmin »

Hoosier Jack wrote: Mon Oct 23, 2017 10:34 pm Overdog has a point about putting those caps back on. I pretty much lost my religion putting mine back together after putting in the new progressives.
I laughed at this...

I know it's expensive, but boy, it makes this job simple and easy!

Image

Honda Part number 07KMF-MT20300

When I bought mine it was $138. It's a little more now:

http://cyclemax.com/inc/sdetail/fork_sp ... 102/269193
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Hoosier Jack
Posts: 419
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 4:21 am
Location: Terre Haute, IN
Motorcycle: 1982 GL1100 Interstate

Re: Progressive springs

Post by Hoosier Jack »

Slick tool. I cut off the handle from an old shovel and put a big groove in it the size of the air fitting. The first one broke, but the second one worked. Had to get the wife to push down the thing while I threaded it in. Finally got it to thread.

BTW I've started out not using any air in the shocks but I do seem to get a bit of hop on nice roads. Not sure if adding air would help. Had new tires mounted and it is possible that the balance is off. Bike does feet so much more stable with the progressives and new tires though, so the OP should like the changes.
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Rednaxs60
Posts: 2584
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Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
2014 Can-Am Spyder RT LE
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition (sold)
2012 Suzuki DL1000 VStrom (sold)
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Progressive springs

Post by Rednaxs60 »

WingAdmin wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:49 pm
I know it's expensive, but boy, it makes this job simple and easy!

Image

Honda Part number 07KMF-MT20300

When I bought mine it was $138. It's a little more now:

http://cyclemax.com/inc/sdetail/fork_sp ... 102/269193
Have found one up here in the soon to be frozen north, did the exchange and will be ordering it. Proper tool for the job is so much easier considering the time and resources for a DIY. Used a drywall dimpler for years, then decided to get a drywall screw gun - time saved paid for it. Also a little older and don't need the accident factor.

Cheers
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest
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purgeraptor
Posts: 17
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 8:43 pm
Location: Reading UK
Motorcycle: 1980 GL1100

Re: Progressive springs

Post by purgeraptor »

I just put the fork leg in a vice with ally jaws, then used a massive half inch drive socket with a crank handle to turn the cap whilst pushing down.
Worked a treat.

Also stuffed the socket with some cloth avoid scoring the fork cap flats.
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WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 22241
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Progressive springs

Post by WingAdmin »

purgeraptor wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:02 pm I just put the fork leg in a vice with ally jaws, then used a massive half inch drive socket with a crank handle to turn the cap whilst pushing down.
Worked a treat.

Also stuffed the socket with some cloth avoid scoring the fork cap flats.
The problem is, especially on the GL1500, good luck leaning over it, pushing a spring in 6 inches with 80 lbs of force, while trying not to cross-thread an aluminum cap with tiny fine threads that are easily ripped out. That's why I bought that tool, which makes the process simple and easy, both on and off.
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Rednaxs60
Posts: 2584
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
2014 Can-Am Spyder RT LE
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition (sold)
2012 Suzuki DL1000 VStrom (sold)
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Progressive springs

Post by Rednaxs60 »

WingAdmin wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:04 pm
purgeraptor wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:02 pm I just put the fork leg in a vice with ally jaws, then used a massive half inch drive socket with a crank handle to turn the cap whilst pushing down.
Worked a treat.

Also stuffed the socket with some cloth avoid scoring the fork cap flats.
The problem is, especially on the GL1500, good luck leaning over it, pushing a spring in 6 inches with 80 lbs of force, while trying not to cross-thread an aluminum cap with tiny fine threads that are easily ripped out. That's why I bought that tool, which makes the process simple and easy, both on and off.
Getting too old for the accident factor as well. Don't fancy having to replace the front forks either because of a small mistake. Besides, do it in a few minutes or a few hours, time is worth something. I also think that having to do oil changes every two years will pay for it in no time. Amortize $250.00 CDN over 6 years and it really is not a lot, one 24 of beer a year up here.

Cheers


"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest
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