Timing Case broken


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
Post Reply
User avatar
radfordgoldwingresto
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:56 pm
Location: Radford, VA
Motorcycle: 1983GL1100 Goldwing Interstate

Timing Case broken

Post by radfordgoldwingresto »



So this is my first post and I'm hoping y'all will have some good news for me. I purchased a project bike (1983 GL1100 Interstate) and after getting it home, discovered that the INSIDE portion of the timing belt case was broken off. The rightside pully is exposed and a tad surface rust. I pulled off the front case but before I dove in watched a ton of videos about changing the timing belt. None of them told me if I could get away with just pulling off that pully to remove the broken part of the case. Can I do that without disturbing the timing and do I need to replace the pully? I have the replacement part of the case and new belts and gaskets ordered but didn't think I'd replace the pully. Thoughts? Can I replace that inner cover without a huge ordeal?


User avatar
DenverWinger
Posts: 1944
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:20 pm
Location: Denver, CO
Motorcycle: (s)
1980 GL1100 STD Vetter (2005-)
1993 GL1500 Aspencade (2017-)
1983 Trav-Lite Camper (2010-)
Past rides
1972 CL350 (1980-1988) sold
1978 Suzuki GS550 (1985-2005) sold
1977 GL1000 (2002-2006) sold

Re: Timing Case broken

Post by DenverWinger »

Welcome to the forum!

Go ahead and remove the pulley from the cam without worry about timing, the pulley is keyed, and will only fit on correctly. Probably easiest to bust the pulley bolt loose before you remove the belts. Bolt might be stubborn and want to turn the engine, if so just shift into 5th gear and have someone hold the rear brake, or put a broom handle thru the rear wheel against the swingarm, that will stop the engine from turning. Just get the bolt broken loose, don't take it out until you have your cam marks and your "T1" mark lined up. You probably want to shift back to neutral for that. Then take off your belts and pulley. You will notice that the right side cam will want to turn about two "belt cogs" CCW from correct time as looking at it from the front of the engine when you take that belt off, don't worry about that for now.

No need to replace the steel pulley, just knock any rust off the cogs where the belt runs (won't be any if the engine has been running) and whether or not you do anything about rust on the rest of the pulley is totally up to you, it won't hurt anything. If you decide to de-rust it, that "Calcium-Lime-Rust" bathroom cleaner and a stiff brush will probably do a nice job.

When putting this all back together, install your cam pulley, and just get the bolt snug, we'll torque it down after the new belts are on. Left side belt will go on without argument, but you will be fighting a valve spring to get the right side cam to the correct position for installing the belt. There's an easier way to do this, instead of fighting the cam, simply turn the crankshaft a corresponding two cogs in the same direction, THEN put the belt on. You'll find after the belt is on if you turn the crank back to the T1 mark that the cam pulley will be lined up correctly.

You'll notice when the crank is at the T1 mark, the timing marks on the cam don't line up "Exact", but you'll know the belts are correct if one cog in either direction would make it line up "worse". Then set your belt tension and lock down the tensioners. Most people don't have a spring gauge, but if you can only deflect the belt a total of a half inch with reasonable pressure that is a decent setting.

Turn the crankshaft with a wrench at least two full revs, being sure it turns smoothly (no pistons hitting valves), this will help to confirm timing is correct. Then torque down your cam pulley bolt, might need to shift into 5th to hold the engine from turning again.

You didn't say if the bike was running or not, I assume it was, with the belts and pulley tightened down you can fire it up at this point and run it a few seconds without coolant, it should run as before.

Then button her back up and you should be good to go.
♫ 99 Little Bugs in the Code, ♪
♪ 99 Bugs in the Code. ♫ :(
♫ Take one down, Patch it around, ♪
♫ 127 Little Bugs in the Code. ♫ ♪ :shock:

~Mark
User avatar
radfordgoldwingresto
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:56 pm
Location: Radford, VA
Motorcycle: 1983GL1100 Goldwing Interstate

Re: Timing Case broken

Post by radfordgoldwingresto »

Thanks a lot for taking so much time to respond. This is exactly what I needed. The bike didn't run when I got it and I was told it was a starter problem. As I work on it, I find more clues that that info may not have been totally honest. *like the broken timing case). Two plugs were out on the right side so I am curious how much moister/debris may have found its way into the cylinders. I've already flushed the oil the best I could without a running engine. The new starter and timing case are the first order.
Post Reply