Higher Speed Miss


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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Ikey45
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2019 1:25 am
Location: Hamilton New Zealand
Motorcycle: Honda Goldwing 1982 GL1100 interstate
1980 Suzuki GS850
1987 Suzuki GS1100
1986 VT1100 Honda Shadow
2006 VT750 Honda Shadow
1995 ZX6r Kawasaki Ninja

Higher Speed Miss

Post by Ikey45 »



Hi all, I joined this site a year ago, after purchasing a 1982 GL1100.
I would like to say thank you for all the great how-to articles.
This is my first post and thought it would be good to share diagnosing a high speed miss.
Perhaps a little history might be helpful.
This bike was purchased from my local Honda dealership with 80k on the clock.They never mentioned the bike had been off the road for 15 years. As a result the bike required new tyres, brakes, gauge work and leaks in rear air- shocks and front air assist for the front forks. The exhaust system was also replaced.
Three months later I finally got the bike back. I ran the bike for about 6 months but the engine certainly sounded very knocky on start up and poor performance at speed.
Then a higher speed miss or stubble appeared, normally around 100km. A little difficult to explain but the hesitation and mis-firing made further acceleration impossible. Almost like a governor holding the acceleration back. As the bike lost speed this malfunction would still continue now at 80 kms and so on. At lower speeds (50km) there was no mis-fire or hesitation.
After reading many articles on this site, I found a methodical approach was needed.
The following work was done over the following 3 months:
The fuel tank was cleaned, fuel cap cleaned, lines and petrol filter replaced, fuel pump tested, new oil/filter, new coils, leads, caps, plugs and new cam belts fitted.
I compression tested the engine at 175 psi on each cylinder. Of interest, the cam pulley marks were not aligned, as cylinders 2 and 4 were firing slightly after top dead center. This was moved back one tooth with the new belts being fitted. Upon reassembly, the engine certainly sounded a lot smoother and quieter. I had hoped all this work might fix my mis-fire but sadly it was still there.
Over the next few months, with once again with the help of this site, I ohms tested the charging system, pulse generator, coils, pick up coils, fuse box, the 30amp main fuse, ignition switch, kill switch and continuity tested the wiring loom. All electrical connectors were cleaned and polished.
By this stage, as I could find no electrical fault other than very dirty connections, I considered pulling the carbs but as the engine idled well and would rev up without the mis-firing, I held off. However, I did remove the drains plugs from the carbs and a lot of dirt and what appeared to look like varnish grains could be seen. The carbs were then filled with a carb cleaner and sat for a few weeks before draining and refilling with fresh petrol.
Upon reassembly, I found the bike would now not start. Upon further investigation I discovered the prongs in the connector block for the pulse generator,( by the battery) had moved deeper into the connection block, passed their locking point. Once corrected, the engine started well. I test rode the bike thinking I would be dismantling the carbs next but to my surprise, the mis-fire was gone.
I am uncertain what exactly the real underlying problem was but the pulse generator connection block certainly was not making a solid contact. I hope this post might help any others with these same symptoms. Anyway thanks for the guidance and articles this site has provided. Cheers and happy riding!


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