Anti-seize on Valve Cover Bolts and/or Timing Belt Cover Bolts?


Information and questions on GL1100 Goldwings (1980-1983)
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bofler
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Anti-seize on Valve Cover Bolts and/or Timing Belt Cover Bolts?

Post by bofler »



Is it wise to put some anti-seize on those long bolts that attach the valve covers and the timing belt covers?



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DenverWinger
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Re: Anti-seize on Valve Cover Bolts and/or Timing Belt Cover Bolts?

Post by DenverWinger »

Shouldn't need it.

Having said that, if you had one of them be particularly stubborn to remove I'd use it on that bolt. It may want to "re-seize"
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Re: Anti-seize on Valve Cover Bolts and/or Timing Belt Cover Bolts?

Post by WingAdmin »

Something to keep in mind when using anti-seize (or thread lock) compound, or any other substance on threaded fasteners: torque values, unless otherwise specified, are for dry fasteners. Torque is derived from a combination of friction of the threads, friction of the bolt head against the surface, and stretching of the bolt. Add any kind of compound to the threads, and the friction is vastly reduced. This means you will actually stretch the bolt further before an indicated torque value is achieved.

Basically, the same level of "tightness" (from bolt stretch) is achieved at a lower indicated torque value. It's quite possible that a bolt that tightens normally to 40 ft-lb, could FAIL at a lower torque value when a thread lock or anti-seize compound is applied to the threads. You could also end up exceeding the strength of the threads, so you could get to 35 ft-lb indicated, and end up stripping out the bolt hole.

So if you are putting any kind of compound on the threads, the general rule of thumb is to reduce the torque applied by 25%. So that 40 ft-lb fastener would be considered fully tightened at 30 ft-lb when anti-seize is applied to its threads.



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