1986 Honda Goldwing GL1200 Interstate Bike Tire Change


Information and questions on GL1200 Goldwings (1984-1987)
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Goldwing*1986
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Motorcycle: 1986 Honda Goldwing GL1200 Interstate

1986 Honda Goldwing GL1200 Interstate Bike Tire Change

Post by Goldwing*1986 »



Howdy GWer's

I bought my 1st ever GW last summer. It is a 1986 Honda GL 1200 I with relatively low miles 25,xxx miles and counting. The bike is relatively in good condition. However, the bike needs new tires esp on the rear. Any advice on the changing the tire would be great! Do I need to remove the hard side saddle bags and trunk storage unit to access the tire?
Thanks you all your input.

GP



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WingAdmin
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Re: 1986 Honda Goldwing GL1200 Interstate Bike Tire Change

Post by WingAdmin »

Goldwing*1986 wrote:Howdy GWer's

I bought my 1st ever GW last summer. It is a 1986 Honda GL 1200 I with relatively low miles 25,xxx miles and counting. The bike is relatively in good condition. However, the bike needs new tires esp on the rear. Any advice on the changing the tire would be great! Do I need to remove the hard side saddle bags and trunk storage unit to access the tire?
Thanks you all your input.

GP
It depends on what you mean by "access".

You can check/fill the tire pressure just getting down on the ground and rotating the tire while it's on the center stand.

You can access the brake bleeder nipple through the left bag without removing anything.

To remove the wheel/change the tire, the bags first need to be removed. The trunk can stay in place.

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SilverDave
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Re: 1986 Honda Goldwing GL1200 Interstate Bike Tire Change

Post by SilverDave »

You can certainly "gain access" with removing all the bags ... I did it that way once ...

But ....

My saddle bags have several lights wired in , and removal means un-soldering and re-soldering several wires . So if you remove , all the left saddlebag bolts ( 2 in floor, 2 on side ) and with careful shock cord placement you can hold the left bag up. If you have a lift, then you will have enough space to work in there, loosening axle and shock and brake bolts .

Not totally removing both bags and the rear fender saves me at least an hour on this job .

I remove my tire from the bottom ,( not the back as outlined in my manual) so I want the ability to raise / lower the tire and rear swing arm to remove the axle. Once shocks and brake unit are tied up, out of the way, tire/wheel slides right out .

Replacement means the same up-and-down in reverse with the raising / lowering jack .
I often use an 8 foot 2x4 levered on a 6x6 block to do the " up-and-down " dance.

Three points :
a) Grease up the splines when you have the wheel off ( Honda Moly 7 ? )
b) Now is a good time to re-new the rear brake pads, as most of the work is already done .
c) The right lower shock absorber bolt is a real B#$@^%$ !
Its square headed, and must be aligned PERFECTLY to fit into its hole .

You can ease the top corner a bit with a file on a drill press ..
But the internal shock spring makes the whole thing move just enough(1 mm ? ) to misalign the hole .

I found the best tool was a finger operated scissor jack to move the swing arm up and down just a smidgen , until the hole is aligned....

Have fun !
----- Be sure to record all your choice cuss words about the right shock bolt to share with the rest of us !! -----

SilverDave

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