What do you need to make the air suspension manually adjustable


Information and questions on GL1200 Goldwings (1984-1987)
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froche
Posts: 277
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:56 pm
Location: Vista, ca
Motorcycle: 1985 Goldwing Aspencade (GL1200A)
2002 GL1800

Former bikes;
2000 R1100RT
2005 Suzuki Bandit
1979 Yamaha XS1100
1978 Yamaha XS1100 Special
1990 Yamaha XV250
1980 Yamaha XV750
1979 Honda CB750
1968 Triumph Bonneville T120
1973 Honda CB450
1968 Harley Davidson Sportster
1974 Honda CB750
1968 Honda CL72

What do you need to make the air suspension manually adjustable

Post by froche »



What parts are needed to make the rear air shocks manually adjustable.



wiretician
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:41 am
Location: cartersville, ga
Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200I
1993 GL1500SE (gone, but not forgotten)

Re: What do you need to make the air suspension manually adjustable

Post by wiretician »

Not sure if this is what you mean, but on my 87 Interstate (which is manually adjusted, no onboard compressor like the 1500SE). I'm guessing that your onboard system has failed and parts are scarce or expensive. Know the feeling, got the 1200 without the original radio set up, had an Audiovox automotive radio installed. Contemplating a modification of radio, noodling out the details. But, on to the manual suspension. Remove the right side cover, you will find above the brake reservoir an air schrader. The schrader is attached to a manifold. Coming out of the manifold you will find two tubes, each goes to separate rear shock. You simply check and add pressure as you would on a tire (25 - 57psi). On the pre-flight checks, it's easy to check the pressure while you have the gauge and air hose out to check the tires. Front shocks are a bit trickier, I use a tire filling tank pressurized to about 6 - 6.5 psi (this makes it hard to over pressurize if you only start with max pressure). Put air chuck on fork schrader and pressure equalizes, and forks are really close to 6psi.
Hope this helps and was what you were looking for.
Experience in the Maintenance Field: Nothing is "Foolproof" to the Talented Fool. There are some that would break an anvil with a rubber mallet.

froche
Posts: 277
Joined: Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:56 pm
Location: Vista, ca
Motorcycle: 1985 Goldwing Aspencade (GL1200A)
2002 GL1800

Former bikes;
2000 R1100RT
2005 Suzuki Bandit
1979 Yamaha XS1100
1978 Yamaha XS1100 Special
1990 Yamaha XV250
1980 Yamaha XV750
1979 Honda CB750
1968 Triumph Bonneville T120
1973 Honda CB450
1968 Harley Davidson Sportster
1974 Honda CB750
1968 Honda CL72

Re: What do you need to make the air suspension manually adjustable

Post by froche »

Remove the right side cover, you will find above the brake reservoir an air schrader. The schrader is attached to a manifold.
You are not correct I think, on the Aspencades the compressor is attached to the rear suspension by a line and no Schrader valves,

wiretician
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 9:41 am
Location: cartersville, ga
Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200I
1993 GL1500SE (gone, but not forgotten)

Re: What do you need to make the air suspension manually adjustable

Post by wiretician »

You are correct that the rear is connected directly to the compressor system. Didn't know if you were looking for guidance on manually adjusting your suspension system as it is, or if it failed and you were going to remove it and how a totally manual system was set up, and how to copy it. In my eBay searches, I've noticed that those parts are rather expensive. I would probably see if and experiment a bit to get the system back up or last case alternative of making it strictly manual and remove the dead weight. Of course, that's just me, but I've been around engines, turbines, mechanical, electrical, and electronics (including robotics) about all my life, from working with dad in his shop, through the Army, now electrical maintenance at a steel mill. Repairing and troubleshooting is what I do for a living, sometimes integrating this and that to make something totally different.
However, if I have missed the whole point of the question, sorry. :oops:


Experience in the Maintenance Field: Nothing is "Foolproof" to the Talented Fool. There are some that would break an anvil with a rubber mallet.

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