Rectifier relocation


Information and questions on GL1200 Goldwings (1984-1987)
Post Reply
User avatar
WillIamBurnett
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2020 9:03 am
Location: Creedmoor NC
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 limited

Rectifier relocation

Post by WillIamBurnett »



Has anyone done a relocation of the rectifier? I see some posts well alot of posts about how hot they get....and some people putting a small cpu fan there but noone relocating it🤷‍♂️



User avatar
patbrandon1
Posts: 618
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2012 1:39 am
Location: Bay City, Michigan
Motorcycle: 1987 GL1200 Interstate
1982 GL1100I (Crashed)
1981 Honda CM400C (Sold)
Contact:

Re: Rectifier relocation

Post by patbrandon1 »

Never have I seen that done either. One of the reasons might be that the resistance would change at the wires to it that would need to be extended. (Eight of them) There may be certain resistances that need to be held for the Reg/Rec to work correctly. Especially the three yellow wires.

Curious as to where it would be located to as well. Those little cooling fans don't have a lot of draw, and that's the way I'd go if I were concerned that it's getting too hot.

I have a alternator conversion kit on mine, and it was very satisfying to remove the reg/rec and toss it in a parts bin. The 1200's were notorious for the stator going bad, for a number of reasons. When mine went, the alternator kit I put on fit what I wanted, because now I have as many amps and voltage (14v at idle) as I will ever need.

I'll enjoy seeing what others say about reg/rec relocation. If you do it, keep us posted, and pictures are always fun.

User avatar
Rednaxs60
Posts: 2347
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:44 pm
Location: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 LTD
1995 GL1500 SE CDN Edition
2012 Suzuki DL1000 VStrom
2008 GL1800 (sold)
Ontario 1985 GL1200 LTD (sold)

Re: Rectifier relocation

Post by Rednaxs60 »

Not a lot of real estate/area to install a small cooling fan where the RR is installed on the '85 Limited Edition. The only relocation I have seen is when a series RR - SH847 - was installed on this model. Know this because I sent the RR to him, I have the alt mod on my '85 Limited Edition. He mounted the SH847 on the inside of the right saddlebag. Lots of room. He disconnected the original and rewired to suit. Only had to relocate the stator wiring and he connected directly to the battery. The original RR must be disconnected from the electrical wiring.

You could do the same for the original, but would have a few more wires to run to the RR. Pics of his install:




The series RR is a good replacement. Operates cooler and the stator will as well. The most popular series RR are the SH847, SH775, and the Compu Fire 55402. All good and can be used on the Limited Edition. Check out Roadster Cycle web site. It has the SH847 and SH775. I use the Compu Fire 55402 on my 1000 V-Strom in place of Rick's Hotshot RR.

This web site gives a short blurb on the SH775: file:///C:/Users/ernes/Downloads/Shindengen%20SH775%20a%20Series%20Regulator%20Which%20Protects%20the%20Stator.pdf
"When you write the story of your life, don't let anyone else hold the pen"

Ernest

User avatar
WillIamBurnett
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2020 9:03 am
Location: Creedmoor NC
Motorcycle: 1985 GL1200 limited

Re: Rectifier relocation

Post by WillIamBurnett »

I am an electrician by trade, commercial work mostly so I have a good understanding of resistance and such....with that I looked at the configuration of the wiring and the best I can tell...the only wire that would really be affected would be the black wire from the ignition switch? I was thinking of putting it down near the front where it could get more air cooling 🤷‍♂️ I'm going to give this rectifier from Rick's a little time and see if it works right. So far so good, just seemed like a stupid place to put something that gets that hot....right there by a bunch of other wiring and no air flow.

User avatar
Ghostt
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Jan 17, 2018 5:06 pm
Location: Willow Shade, Ky
Motorcycle: 84 Aspencade aka Behemoth
88/07 Ninja 500 aka Nightwing
91 Ninja 500 aka Phoenix
98 Ninja 250 aka Serenity
Contact:

Re: Rectifier relocation

Post by Ghostt »

My 2 cents;

I converted to a MOSFET R/R, instead of keeping the OEM shunt R/R.

It was easy enough, as I've done this to other bikes, to update to a better R/R. I cut the connector off the OEM shunt, and the used FURUKAWA CONNECTORS for SHINDENGEN FH020.

Then mounted it the stock location, it's a tight fit, but it works.

Sidenote: Rick's electric makes a MOSFET R/R that's plug and play. https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/Ho ... or-10_105H












User avatar
Ghostt
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Jan 17, 2018 5:06 pm
Location: Willow Shade, Ky
Motorcycle: 84 Aspencade aka Behemoth
88/07 Ninja 500 aka Nightwing
91 Ninja 500 aka Phoenix
98 Ninja 250 aka Serenity
Contact:

Re: Rectifier relocation

Post by Ghostt »

Information about MOSFET R/R, part of a write-up did on another forum,


MOSFET? What exactly is that? I knew the term from the audio industry but I figured I'd copy and paste the information verbatim for the purposes of explanation. From wikipedia:



Fine, that's what it is. What does it do? Again from wiki:



In actual operation, they shunt until there is no more voltage and then resume operation. This can be a bad thing because when the regulator is shunted, the battery is not getting charged. If you add more drain, the regulator will actually shunt less and run cooler. Either way, the battery, which has to be maintained at a specific level of charge for normal operation, is not getting the amount of charge it needs. Factor in malfunctions which occur relatively frequently in any kind of mechanical switch and the benefit of using a MOSFET type switch becomes more clear.

The MOSFET switch shunts also, but less frequently and only until voltage returns to an acceptable level, not to complete dissipation. The result is, it runs cooler, and it is much more effective as a regulator, delivering continuous voltage to the battery, regardless of engine speed. With a standard shunt type regulator, the charge rate at the battery actually goes down with an increase in engine speed. It's more effective at idle rather than full throttle.

I did some online research and found that all available MOSFET type R/Rs are made by a single company in Japan. Shindengen is the name of it. Suzuki uses a MOSFET type too, but the manufacturer of theirs isn't on the RR itself. That makes identification nearly impossible.

Honda, Kawasaki and Yamaha all use Shindengen RRs in varying part or model numbers. These seem to range from an FH0001 to an FH0018A. The FH0001 can be found on R1s prior to 2006. It's huge though. The CBR/RR models use an FH0014A and the ZX6R an FH0016A. The most common ones used in the conversion are from either the R1 or the ZX10, that an FH0012A and an FH0010A respectively. There are others out there, including an FH0008A that I've seen available on Ebay. Any of these would be worth the $50-$70 asking price to do the conversion.

There is some conjecture on the web about the output amperage of these RRs. Some claim that the FH0012AA is 50A but some of the others to be at 35A. I read somewhere that Shindengen states they are 40 to 50A in all cases. Whether this is the case or not, I don't have any of these units in my hand with a test lead and my digital Voltmeter to test that claim. There are kits available now on Ebay also that include the RR and all the associated wiring, terminals and fitting to make the conversion work. Roadstercycle is the name of the site. Also, it was suggested that some sort of volt meter be added to the bike to monitor voltage being sent to the battery.

Further there is a company called Eastern Beaver that sells connector fittings and terminals. Some are packaged into kits also for just this job. Current models from the big 4 all have this type RR installed going back to 2006. Some going back to 2003 or 2004 depending on the model and manufacturer. I don't know about any of the Euro 4 doing the same. (BMW, Ducati, Aprilia and Triumph) Nothing I found during my research of this topic indicated that was the case. In fact, several forum articles I found indicated that this mod was being done on Triumphs, Aprilias and Ducatis. I don't know about BMW. I didn't see anything to indicate that.


The Stator (alternator in car lingo) creates an AC current by passing magnets over coils of wires while the engine is turning. The VR (Voltage Regulator) Regulates the voltage and to some degree the amperage created by the stator. It does this in order to not cook the battery. The faster the motor spins the more voltage it creates. Batteries shoul not be charged much higher than 14v. The stator without a regulator could run away to voltages of 24v+. Voltages higher than 14.5v will burn out a battery quickly. The shunt regulator basically shorts out all voltage over the limit of 14.5v which in some cases is shorting a lot of voltage and amperage to ground which creates a lot of heat. The Mosfets basically do the same thing but with more finess than brute force. They turn on and off several thousand times a second to keep the voltage steady. The Mosfets do not need as much power to operate and such can operate at lower rpms.


After your next ride, feel how hot your vr is. They get very warm if not hot. They are engineered just good enough for the heat they have to endure. The better way there is no significant heat therefore less stress and less possibility for failure. Its taking something that may very well break and replacing it with something that probably won't ever break. Less heat equals less stress in electronics.

User avatar
WingAdmin
Site Admin
Posts: 21294
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 4:16 pm
Location: Strongsville, OH
Motorcycle: 2000 GL1500 SE
1982 GL1100A Aspencade (sold)
1989 PC800 (sold)
1998 XV250 Virago (sold)
2012 Suzuki Burgman 400 (wife's!)
2007 Aspen Sentry Trailer

Re: Rectifier relocation

Post by WingAdmin »

Let me explain in quick and simple terms why a MOSFET works well for this type of application.

A MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) is a special type of transistor that is ideally suited for switching high current loads. The reason: unlike regular resistors, there is almost zero internal resistance when the MOSFET is turned on (biased) all the way.

If you turn it on part way, it will present resistance to the load just like any transistor - and when you have current flowing through resistance, you get heat. So the current limit of the device is dependent on how much heat it can sink (get rid of).

A MOSFET however, when used as an on/off switch, has almost no resistance when on, which means very little heat!

For this reason, they work really well for high-current switching applications. For things that need partial power, you can use a duty cycle to switch it on and off. I used MOSFETS in my heated clothing controller circuit design like this. If the heat is turned up all the way, the MOSFETs are turned on all the time. If I turn the heat to 60%, the MOSFET gets turned on 100% for 6 seconds, then off for 4 seconds, then repeats this cycle. This means the MOSFET is never partially biased (so not heat), and the heated gear takes long enough to heat up and cool down that you can't tell that it's being switched on and off.



Post Reply