A question about the low fuel sensor


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Swagonmaster
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Motorcycle: 1990 gl1500 SE

A question about the low fuel sensor

Post by Swagonmaster »



I have been thinking about the low fuel sensor light and how hard it to rely on it since it can hardly be seen in bright sunlight. This is directed towards the more electronically gifted among us, what is the chance that a device could be put together that would be able to sense when the resistance in the low fuel sensor is becoming low and the bulb is therefore beginning to light and switch on 12 volts to the bulb? This would prevent the need to replace the sensor to make the low fuel light visible at a reasonable fuel level (which could be set as desired electronically). Since I know that some have replaced the sensing mechanism to accomplish this I question wether the idea is feasible or at least reasonable. Anyone want to take a stab at it?


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Charlie1Horse
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Motorcycle: 1986 GL1200A Aspencade
1992 GL1500I Interstate

Re: A question about the low fuel sensor

Post by Charlie1Horse »

Maybe you should try the instrument panel LED conversion. The LEDs are bright, besides lasting the rest of the bikes lifetime.
Russell

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MikeB
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Re: A question about the low fuel sensor

Post by MikeB »

If you are somewhat electronics challenged, I do not recommend the LED route. Besides, that low fuel light will last longer than the bike considering how little time it is illuminated.

I'd suggest just replacing the bulb that is in there with a 194LL bulb and see how that works for you. You can easily reach up under the dash and get to the bulb holder for bulb replacement.

Also, keep an eye on the fuel gauge as well as getting in the habit of resetting your trip odometer when you refuel.

Use all three to gauge your need for refueling. That has always worked for me.
MikeB
1998 - GL1500 w/184,500 miles ~ 2017 - GL1800 w/13000 miles
USAF Avionics Communications Tech - 18 Years / Flight Engineer C-130E - C-141B - 6 Years. Retired.
Industrial Maintenance Tech - 22 years.
Retired in Tacoma, WA

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Swagonmaster
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Re: A question about the low fuel sensor

Post by Swagonmaster »

I do try to keep an eye on the fuel gauge and I have to reset the tripmeter when I fill up so as to have an idea of how many miles I can go but when the need to go deep in the tank comes up it would be more than a little comforting to have a very good idea how much motion lotion is still there to be used.
Try to learn from the mistakes of others..... you won't live long enough to make them all yourself!

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MikeB
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Re: A question about the low fuel sensor

Post by MikeB »

Swagonmaster wrote:
Tue Apr 07, 2020 5:49 pm
I do try to keep an eye on the fuel gauge and I have to reset the tripmeter when I fill up so as to have an idea of how many miles I can go but when the need to go deep in the tank comes up it would be more than a little comforting to have a very good idea how much motion lotion is still there to be used.
I agree. I have on occassion taken a fuel can with me to check just how far I can go before the light comes on. I did that to build confidence. After a couple of times when the light came on as the fuel gauge needle was buried in the empty zone, I found a gas station and fueled it up only to find I still had a gallon of fuel left. Of course, that is my bike and riding style. You just have to get comfortable with your bike and fuel consumption. There is no real formula for every rider and machine.
MikeB
1998 - GL1500 w/184,500 miles ~ 2017 - GL1800 w/13000 miles
USAF Avionics Communications Tech - 18 Years / Flight Engineer C-130E - C-141B - 6 Years. Retired.
Industrial Maintenance Tech - 22 years.
Retired in Tacoma, WA

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Erdeniz Umman
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Re: A question about the low fuel sensor

Post by Erdeniz Umman »

I have calibrated the fuel gauge reading so that the fuel low light comes on at below the E line.
So, I know the light will come on that spot and I can cross-check both the light and the gauge.

Here is my note about fuel gauge calibration.

Remove the seat,
Remove the fuel pump,
Locate the float arm with your left hand while your body facing backwards,
Bend the float arm with your thumb while holding the arm with other fingers,
Check the gauge and repeat it until the gauge reads correctly,

When calibrating mine, I emptied the tank completely and added 4lt (1 galon) of fuel (fuel light should come on in 3 min when the fuel pump is reinstalled), and bent the float arm so that the fuel gauge will read just below E line.

After that, I checked the gauge while refueling and it read correctly as I added 5-10-15-20 liters of fuel (24 liters=6.3 galon total).

After this calibration the fuel gauge will show Full and stay there for the first 100km (60mil), and then will start showing correctly for the rest of the range, which is more important for us.

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Swagonmaster
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Re: A question about the low fuel sensor

Post by Swagonmaster »

That would be one good option, at least the gauge could be believed that way.


Try to learn from the mistakes of others..... you won't live long enough to make them all yourself!

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