Right rear shock question.


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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Bettedavis
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Joined: Wed Jul 24, 2019 8:44 am
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Motorcycle: 2008 Honda VTX1300 (Lucy)
1997 BMW R1100RT (Pierre)
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1994 Honda GL1500SE w/ Escort sidecar (Thelma & Louise)
1997 BMW R1100RT (Archibald)

Right rear shock question.

Post by Bettedavis »



Hello, I have a 1994 wing, these past couple of months I have replaced the timing belts, changed the oil, replace/rebuilt the petcock, fuel filter, fuel pump. Took the slave cylinder off to discover it needed replacement, oh, new plugs...lots of stuff. Well I come out this morning and the right rear shock has spilled all of its bodily fluids onto the floor of the shop. The motorcycle gods keep sending me things to keep me from riding this thing and I'm totally chill with that. Read some older posts about replacing the shock, I'm sure this will require taking off a lot of plastic. Long story short?..What is the updated logic on a good replacement, is it still the Progressive 416's or is there an even better option.
P.S. I have managed all these things with the help of this site. Thanks
The only stupid question is the one not asked. Here goes...I don't weigh that much, never have two up. Could I just go with it the way it is...for just a bit anyway? Thanks :)



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Rambozo
Posts: 470
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:36 pm
Location: Disneyland
Motorcycle: 1992 GL1500 Aspencade

Re: Right rear shock question.

Post by Rambozo »

You can get a seal kit for it. There are quite a few threads here about doing that job.

oakback
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Re: Right rear shock question.

Post by oakback »

I replaced my shock seal yesterday. The seal is $13.75 from Cyclemax. I also opted to replace my boot for an additional $39.

Removing the saddlebag is well documented. For me, the most difficult part of that step was removing the 4-pronged white plastic clip that holes the saddlebad release cable in place. Everything else was simple.

Removing the seal itself took a while to figure out. I couldn't find any clear instructions or posts on how it's done, just some random comments here and there. Mainly, there is a snap ring holding the seal in, that was very difficult to remove. It has a round cross section, with no notches or anything to get a pick or screwdriver onto. I saw a comment about smashing the seal inward (not much else for explanation, no pics or details). So I did that. I used a flathead screwdriver and hammered the seal inward, which formed a gap under the snap ring, which then allowed me to pull the snap ring out with a pick.

Then (and this is well documented elsewhere as well) the seal and bottom stuffs in the shock is easily removed by blasting pressurized air into the shock, and will pop out with a loud "pop". Installation was much easier than removal. There are probably better methods, but for me I steadily tapped the new seal into place with a block of one and gentle taps alternating side to get it to insert evenly.

Then you add your ATF and put everything back.

Oh yeah, my lower shock bushing had disintegrated. I couldn't find any way to purchase a replacement. You can try to find a similar one by taking careful measurements. Or making your own if you have a lathe. I followed one suggestion of using 1/2" PVC and drilling out the inside to fit the original metal sleeve that was in the OEM bushing. I don't know how well this will hold up, but it's a snug fit, and better than nothing.

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MikeB
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Location: Tacoma, WA
Motorcycle: 1998 - GL1500 Aspencade
183K Miles
2017 - GL1800 Audio Comfort
10K Miles
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Re: Right rear shock question.

Post by MikeB »

Bettedavis wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:08 am
Hello, I have a 1994 wing, these past couple of months I have replaced the timing belts, changed the oil, replace/rebuilt the petcock, fuel filter, fuel pump. Took the slave cylinder off to discover it needed replacement, oh, new plugs...lots of stuff. Well I come out this morning and the right rear shock has spilled all of its bodily fluids onto the floor of the shop. The motorcycle gods keep sending me things to keep me from riding this thing and I'm totally chill with that. Read some older posts about replacing the shock, I'm sure this will require taking off a lot of plastic. Long story short?..What is the updated logic on a good replacement, is it still the Progressive 416's or is there an even better option.
P.S. I have managed all these things with the help of this site. Thanks
The only stupid question is the one not asked. Here goes...I don't weigh that much, never have two up. Could I just go with it the way it is...for just a bit anyway? Thanks :)
I think rebuilding the shock would be the most economical way to go and, if it lasted this long without any maintenance, it should last just as long after you rebuild it.

Removing the shock is pretty straight forward. If you can remove the right saddlebag, it will not be too difficult for you to do at all. You will just need some oil to put back in the shock after you replace the seal and probably the boot. You will have to do a little research to find out what oil to use but I think you have already demonstrated that you are more than capable with that.

Good luck. Stay safe.


MikeB
1998 - GL1500 w/184,500 miles ~ 2017 - GL1800 w/13000 miles
USAF Avionics Communications Tech - 18 Years / Flight Engineer C-130E - C-141B - 6 Years. Retired.
Industrial Maintenance Tech - 22 years.
Retired in Tacoma, WA

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