Fuse by the battery


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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Marlan1
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Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2021 6:15 pm
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Motorcycle: 1998Honda goldwing

Fuse by the battery

Post by Marlan1 »



Hello everyone. I have a 1998 Honda gold wing. When I bought this bike the seller said it didn’t have any issues. Well now, I’m having problems with the lights and the bike charging. When I started trying to trace the problem, I noticed that there is a 55 amp fuse down by the battery that is blown. But somebody tried to bypass it with a 30 amp fuse. Both fuses are blown, and when I change the 30 amp fuse and start to ride it blows and I loose my lights and gauges again. If I crank the bike up and use my power probe and put12 volts to the blown side of the fuse, the lights come on. What would cause the 55 amp fuse to blow and is the 30 amp blowing because it’s not big enough to carry the load or is it something else going on on the bike? Any input will be greatly appreciated.
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Rambozo
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Re: Fuse by the battery

Post by Rambozo »

The dogbone 55A fuse can die from old age, they often get cracks. The 30A may not be enough, especially if you have aftermarket lights like many GoldWing owners add. :roll:




The 55A fuse is available from Honda #98200-65500 $1.80.
There should also be a spare clipped into the fuse cover (which you probably don't have) Honda #38255-MN5-003 $6.58.
Or you can just replace that whole fusebox Honda#38250-MN5-003 $25.21.
One other thing, if you have an upgraded alternator, like a Compufire, they require that you install two 55A fuses as they can output 90A
Sunshinenomad
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Re: Fuse by the battery

Post by Sunshinenomad »

Has anyone installed a 50 or 60a marine circuit breaker instead of the dog bone? Just a thought.
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AZgl1800
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Re: Fuse by the battery

Post by AZgl1800 »

If you can fit it on the bike, not a bad idea.
but you will need to have a Voltmeter on the bike so you can monitor what is going on.

you don't want it tripping, and then resetting over, and over, and .............
~John

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Rambozo
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Re: Fuse by the battery

Post by Rambozo »

Those are manual rest type. I have used them for a lot of installations. There are two issues I have with them. One is that they don't work properly in hot environments. I put them in the engine compartment of a truck and they false trip all the time. So I went back to a fuse there. When mounted inside the cab they did ok. So not sure how they would do on a bike. The other issue is that if you don't test them periodically, they get jammed up and won't reset. I suspect this is from mechanical issues being in a dirty environment. So while they do fine for high power stereo installations in nice cars, they get a fail for industrial truck applications.
Sunshinenomad
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Re: Fuse by the battery

Post by Sunshinenomad »

Thanks guys. Good points. I’ll stick with the fuse.
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WingAdmin
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Re: Fuse by the battery

Post by WingAdmin »

Rambozo wrote: Sun Jul 25, 2021 11:32 pm Those are manual rest type. I have used them for a lot of installations. There are two issues I have with them. One is that they don't work properly in hot environments. I put them in the engine compartment of a truck and they false trip all the time. So I went back to a fuse there. When mounted inside the cab they did ok. So not sure how they would do on a bike. The other issue is that if you don't test them periodically, they get jammed up and won't reset. I suspect this is from mechanical issues being in a dirty environment. So while they do fine for high power stereo installations in nice cars, they get a fail for industrial truck applications.
I used one of those to install a high-current auxiliary circuit in my wife's van, it's mounted in the engine compartment (right next to the battery) and has never false tripped - so it might be it only trips under high current, if it is close to the exhaust manifold?

The other thing to consider is that the trip profile (time, inrush tolerance, etc) of the breaker may differ from a fuse, allowing something down the line to cook before the breaker trips - or more annoyingly, trip repeatedly on transients that a fuse would absorb.


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