94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction


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Tim 1956
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94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by Tim 1956 »



I replaced my speedometer cable this morning quickly and easily with out taking every thing apart. I just removed the trim around each side of the handle bars and the tank top radio console with its extended trim. I could easily get my hand in and remove and screw in a new cable. However, it was not my problem. The past month my speedometer takes about 20 seconds or more to get up to speed. I had the speedo apart many months ago and it was all like new inside and clean. I sprayed some wd40 up inside the speedo this time as there was room to put the nozzle up in it and spray. Now when I stop the speedo is at 15 mph and takes about 10 seconds to fall to zero. :lol: Luckily I know that 2,500 rpm in 4th gear is 43 mph. So I just have to wait about 20 seconds for the needle to reach the correct speed that I've checked with my Garmin gps. Is my speedo going bad? I checked it all out thoroughly when I had it all apart last year. I was surprised at how fast and easy it was to replace the cable and line everything up.


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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by Rambozo »

The wrong lube is bad news for speedometers. Think of it like a watch. Send it to a speedo shop for a cleaning.
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Tim 1956
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by Tim 1956 »

I didn't lube it before. It just started acting up a month ago. I've had it totally apart, so I can lube it myself if I new what to you. Thanks Rambozo. :-)
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by Rambozo »

From your description, you had one problem (it took 20s to get up to speed) then you sprayed WD-40 in it and now you have more problems (sticks going down @ 15, and slow to go up).
Cleaning and lubing a speedo is not a DIY project for the average user.
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Tim 1956
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by Tim 1956 »

I did not think it was rocket science. :lol: But the speedo was fine last year. I guess I will google speedometer repair shop. Thanks Rambozo. Still lover your ginger kitty. :-)
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Tim 1956
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by Tim 1956 »

Rambozo wrote: Fri Dec 10, 2021 4:35 pm From your description, you had one problem (it took 20s to get up to speed) then you sprayed WD-40 in it and now you have more problems (sticks going down @ 15, and slow to go up).
Cleaning and lubing a speedo is not a DIY project for the average user.
Apparently I'm a rocket scientist. :lol: Took my dash apart and had the speedo out in about 40 minutes. Wow, that needle was so stiff. How did it get that way? I sprayed the entire speedo gears and all with crc qd contact cleaner, safe for plastics and it loosened it all up quickly. Then I sprayed the gears and the bell housing in the back and shaft with "blaster industrial Strength Silicone Lubricant" that is recommended for stuff like this. I would keep pushing the speedo needle full turn from post to post back and forth, stop to stop when cleaning and oiling. The same with the tac and temp and fuel gauge. Everything was so sticky. Like a spray tack. Nothing wanted to move without forcing it. Decided to replace all the 158 bulbs because walmart did not have any of the other bulbs 143w for the 2 turn signal bulbs. Considering I never ride at night or the dark. I don't need them. Took it for a 1 miles test ride and the speedo worked amazingly and perfectly on speed and fell to zero right before I stopped completely. Not much to the mechanical speedo. There is a watch/clock type spring that keeps the needle steady and brings it back to zero. No way to find or replace that tiny spring. Just wanted to update that it was all an easy success. :D Thanks.
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by landisr »

Tim 1956 wrote: Mon Dec 13, 2021 12:00 pm
Rambozo wrote: Fri Dec 10, 2021 4:35 pm From your description, you had one problem (it took 20s to get up to speed) then you sprayed WD-40 in it and now you have more problems (sticks going down @ 15, and slow to go up).
Cleaning and lubing a speedo is not a DIY project for the average user.
Apparently I'm a rocket scientist. :lol: Took my dash apart and had the speedo out in about 40 minutes. Wow, that needle was so stiff. How did it get that way? I sprayed the entire speedo gears and all with crc qd contact cleaner, safe for plastics and it loosened it all up quickly. Then I sprayed the gears and the bell housing in the back and shaft with "blaster industrial Strength Silicone Lubricant" that is recommended for stuff like this. I would keep pushing the speedo needle full turn from post to post back and forth, stop to stop when cleaning and oiling. The same with the tac and temp and fuel gauge. Everything was so sticky. Like a spray tack. Nothing wanted to move without forcing it. Decided to replace all the 158 bulbs because walmart did not have any of the other bulbs 143w for the 2 turn signal bulbs. Considering I never ride at night or the dark. I don't need them. Took it for a 1 miles test ride and the speedo worked amazingly and perfectly on speed and fell to zero right before I stopped completely. Not much to the mechanical speedo. There is a watch/clock type spring that keeps the needle steady and brings it back to zero. No way to find or replace that tiny spring. Just wanted to update that it was all an easy success. :D Thanks.
Congrats!! 👍

Ron in AZ
I'm not so sure about an inner child, but I have an inner idiot that surfaces every now and then.. :mrgreen:
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by WingAdmin »

When it comes to WD-40, it is the "wrong answer" for pretty much every task. It's miserable as an electronic contact cleaner, and it's not great as a lubricant. It leaves behind an oily residue that attracts dust and grit, and it thickens over time. It's good for preventing corrosion on surfaces that don't move (i.e. things left in storage), which is what it was originally designed for.
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by AZgl1800 »

WingAdmin wrote: Mon Dec 13, 2021 3:05 pm When it comes to WD-40, it is the "wrong answer" for pretty much every task. It's miserable as an electronic contact cleaner, and it's not great as a lubricant. It leaves behind an oily residue that attracts dust and grit, and it thickens over time. It's good for preventing corrosion on surfaces that don't move (i.e. things left in storage), which is what it was originally designed for.
not quite;
it was designed for the Marine industry to get water out of Distributor caps when wet.

I have done that many a time back when all we had were inline six engines in the late 40s and 50s...

Drive into a snow bank, or pushing snow, and it blows up into the engine compartment, and kaput!!!!
engine quits.

break out the WD-40 and remove the Distributor Cap, wet it down, and varoom! off we go again.
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Re: 94 1500i speedometer cable replacement correction

Post by WingAdmin »

AZgl1800 wrote: Mon Dec 13, 2021 3:11 pm
WingAdmin wrote: Mon Dec 13, 2021 3:05 pm When it comes to WD-40, it is the "wrong answer" for pretty much every task. It's miserable as an electronic contact cleaner, and it's not great as a lubricant. It leaves behind an oily residue that attracts dust and grit, and it thickens over time. It's good for preventing corrosion on surfaces that don't move (i.e. things left in storage), which is what it was originally designed for.
not quite;
it was designed for the Marine industry to get water out of Distributor caps when wet.

I have done that many a time back when all we had were inline six engines in the late 40s and 50s...

Drive into a snow bank, or pushing snow, and it blows up into the engine compartment, and kaput!!!!
engine quits.

break out the WD-40 and remove the Distributor Cap, wet it down, and varoom! off we go again.
Actually WD-40 was military in origin, designed to protect the outer skin of Atlas missiles. But you're correct in that the "WD" stands for "water displacement".

From the WD-40 site:
Rocket Chemical Company and its staff of three set out to create a line of rust-prevention solvents and degreasers for use in the aerospace industry. Convair, an aerospace contractor, first used WD-40 Multi-Use Product to protect the outer skin of the Atlas Missile from rust and corrosion. The product actually worked so well that several employees snuck some cans out of the plant to use at home.


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