SeaFoam Question


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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zeoran
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SeaFoam Question

Post by zeoran »



1999 Aspencade, 80k miles.

I picked up a can of SeaFoam, because of all the great reviews and I'm currently doing as much maintenance on the bike as I can during the next month or so. I just watched a great video on SeaFoam and I've read a bunch of articles and a number of places (including the video) they mention that after using the SeaFoam, you should do a complete oil change after putting maybe 150 miles on it. Since the SeaFoam cleans the gunk out of the engine, it then goes into the oil, where you'll need to change it to clean it.

Problem is, I JUST got through doing an oil change on my GL1500, with full synthetic. I'm not inclined to do ANOTHER oil change with less than 500 miles on the last one.

So should I hold off on doing the SeaFoam until I'm ready to do another oil change? Or is it still worth the benefits of the SeaFoam to do it now? (btw, I was planning on adding it to the gas tank)

God bless,

~Mark


Last edited by zeoran on Sat Apr 09, 2022 9:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Andy Cote
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by Andy Cote »

If you want to use in the crankcase, you can substitute a pint of SeaFoam for engine oil at the next change. Then run the bike for a few hours and do another oil and filter change with all oil.

If you want to use SeaFoam in the fuel system, you can add a pint to half a tank. Ride it for an hour, let it sit overnight, ride another hour then go ahead and fill it up with regular gas. You can do this as often as you want and no need to change the oil after this procedure.
2015 Goldwing, basic black

Previously: GL1200 standard, GL1200 Interstate, GL1500 Goldwing, GL1500 Valkyrie Standard, 2000 Valkyrie Interstate, many other Hondas
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Sassy
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by Sassy »

What are the thoughts on putting a can of Seafoam in right at ths end of an oils life and run if for a "while?" then change to fresh oil and filter?
Would this be a good idea at end of season, last ride of season?
Enjoying the Darkside
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Andy Cote
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by Andy Cote »

Sassy wrote: Sat Apr 09, 2022 8:33 pm What are the thoughts on putting a can of Seafoam in right at ths end of an oils life and run if for a "while?" then change to fresh oil and filter?
Would this be a good idea at end of season, last ride of season?
Before I did that, I would change oil and filter and use inexpensive oil. Then drain and install the good stuff.
2015 Goldwing, basic black

Previously: GL1200 standard, GL1200 Interstate, GL1500 Goldwing, GL1500 Valkyrie Standard, 2000 Valkyrie Interstate, many other Hondas
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zeoran
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by zeoran »

Sassy wrote: Sat Apr 09, 2022 8:33 pm What are the thoughts on putting a can of Seafoam in right at ths end of an oils life and run if for a "while?" then change to fresh oil and filter?
Would this be a good idea at end of season, last ride of season?
This doesn't effect me because I live in Southern California, but a lot of the guys who live where it snows in winter were putting in half a can of SeaFoam & riding it for an hour right before putting it down for the season. They didn't say if they did this because it helps the engine during the cold months of downtime or what. But it seemed a common thing to do right before putting the bike down for the winter season.

God bless,

~Mark
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LAB3
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by LAB3 »

Seems to me the smartest move is to not overthink it. Wait until just before you need your next oil change and add it then.
I'm selling good clean fresh hay. If you want some that's already passed through the horse, that comes a little cheaper!

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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by Andy Cote »

IMHO, 99% of engines have no need for Seafoam in the crankcase.

As far as gasoline goes, it is very helpful in a poorly running engine and many anecdotes of carburetors that might have otherwise needed an overhaul, coming back to good performance.
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by LAB3 »

Andy Cote wrote: Sun Apr 10, 2022 2:41 pm IMHO, 99% of engines have no need for Seafoam in the crankcase.
That's what I thought too, then it was suggested to give it a try to loosen up the crud in the starter sprag clutch in order to get it to engage in cold weather. When I drained the oil it looked like beef stew gravy, lot's of stuff floating around in it! My previous oil changes where darkened but otherwise clear oil as expected, logic tells me that Sea Foam removed some stuff that didn't belong in there.
I'm selling good clean fresh hay. If you want some that's already passed through the horse, that comes a little cheaper!

The best advice on internet motorcycle repair forums comes from posting the wrong answer to your own question.
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zeoran
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by zeoran »

Andy Cote wrote: Sun Apr 10, 2022 2:41 pm IMHO, 99% of engines have no need for Seafoam in the crankcase.

As far as gasoline goes, it is very helpful in a poorly running engine and many anecdotes of carburetors that might have otherwise needed an overhaul, coming back to good performance.
I'm not putting mine in the crankcase, only the gas tank.

I have an hour+ long trip coming up later this month. Normally, I only commute to work/back which is less than 5 miles each way. So I'll wait till the long trip is up, which should coincide with a moderately low gas tank, then I'll add the half-can everyone mentions and run it for the hour there and hour back. That should get it run through well.

The bike isn't necessarily running bad and I've already replaced the oil, refreshed the air filter, changed the spark plugs, all for the sake of maintenance and getting her to run just that much better.
The only problem she's ever really had is the brakes. They've never worked quite properly. I rebuilt the caliper on the front-right along with changing out the old rubber cable for a braided steel cable and it works a lot better now. My next goal is to do the same to the front-left and eventually the rear. (which will be the hardest since I need to tear off the saddlebag just to get to it.)

I think I have an advantage that she's always been in warm weather. The original owner was from AZ and I'm in Southern California. The original owner had a better garage, I just have the shared one that comes with my apartment that doesn't even have power or a flat floor.

God bless,

~Mark
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by WingAdmin »

Sassy wrote: Sat Apr 09, 2022 8:33 pm What are the thoughts on putting a can of Seafoam in right at ths end of an oils life and run if for a "while?" then change to fresh oil and filter?
Would this be a good idea at end of season, last ride of season?
That's EXACTLY what I do, every year, at the end of the season.
01196505gw
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by 01196505gw »

There’s actually a pretty good argument for NOT putting anything in the crankcase that loosens sludge. Lots of little oil passages that could get plugged. I am a fan of Seafoam and Techron in the fuel. MMO too. But in the crankcase? I’ll pass.
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by offcenter »

In the fuel, definitely.
When I got my 1500, it had been sitting for several years.
It wouldn't idle worth a darn.
A couple of cans of seafoam later, it idled perfectly, and still does.
George in Jersey.
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Re: SeaFoam Question

Post by WingAdmin »

01196505gw wrote: Sat Jun 18, 2022 5:49 pm There’s actually a pretty good argument for NOT putting anything in the crankcase that loosens sludge. Lots of little oil passages that could get plugged. I am a fan of Seafoam and Techron in the fuel. MMO too. But in the crankcase? I’ll pass.
The sludge is generally located in spots where there is little oil flow - like the starter sprags, and far corners of the crankcase. When the lumps of sludge are loosened up, they are not going anywhere near small orifices: they first have to make it through the oil pickup screen, get chewed up by both the scavenge and pressure pumps, and also make it through the oil filter. Anything that gets that far is not going to clog any downstream orifice - that's why it's designed that way in the first place.

That's also why you really need to change the oil and filter after a couple of hours of gentle running with the Seafoam in the crankcase, to remove all the dislodged sludge collected in the filter and floating around suspended in the oil.


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