Switch Lubrication.


Information and questions on GL1500 Goldwings (1988-2000)
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Chiefw3
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Switch Lubrication.

Post by Chiefw3 »



Can you use WD40 to lubricate the left and right control switches? i.e, turn signal, hazzard, hi/lo beam/kill switch cruise ect....

Thank you


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blupupher
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by blupupher »

NO!

WD40 will make it worse and gum up the switches even further.

Use and electrical contact cleaner if you are just going to spray it.

There are several how to's articles HERE, from just spraying from the outside to taking the switches completely apart and lubricating them (the better way IMO).

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=9296

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=32453

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=56249

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=46606

I took all my switches apart, cleaned them with electrical contact cleaner and alcohol and lubricated with a silicon lubricant.
As good as (or better than) new IMO.
Last edited by blupupher on Thu Nov 10, 2022 11:50 am, edited 2 times in total.
1994 Goldwing GL1500 SE
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Snowmoer
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by Snowmoer »

Agree with the above. Keep WD 40 away from the bike!

I used the CRC cleaner on the momentary switches. Radio and Cruse up and down switches. Give them a spray and work the switches.

For the locking switches, to do it right, you need to take them apart. Clean out the old dielectric grease and replace it. The second link is a good one on how to do this. The old grease gets sticky over the years and the switch contacts get corrosion on them. Just be careful when taking them apart. There are small springs in there that can pop out of the switch. Also, the turn signal switch has a small ball bearing that can jump out. Some people use a big zip lock bag to put the switch in when taking them apart to catch any flying parts. Put in new dielectric grease and the switches will be buttery smooth. You are not spraying them every year to get them to work again. It is worth the time and effort to do it right the first time.

Here is the grease you need.

https://www.autozone.com/greases-and-ge ... 42f3a7478a
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Chiefw3
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by Chiefw3 »

Thank you very much for the replies. Very helpful.
Bob
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Rigid
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by Rigid »

I definitely need to clean my blinker switch.
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Rambozo
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by Rambozo »

Rigid wrote: Thu Nov 10, 2022 9:26 pm I definitely need to clean my blinker switch.


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DenverWinger
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by DenverWinger »

So which blinker fluid is better? Synthetic or Conventional?


Not trying to start a blinker fluid war..... :lol:
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MikeB
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by MikeB »

Chiefw3 wrote: Thu Nov 10, 2022 6:16 am Can you use WD40 to lubricate the left and right control switches? i.e, turn signal, hazzard, hi/lo beam/kill switch cruise ect....

Thank you
WD-40 is not a lubricant. WD-40 is a multi-purpose product that is typically used to remove corrosion, prevent rust and get all kinds of things unstuck.
It was originally developed to remove water from the outer skin of Atlas missiles to prevent rust and corrosion.

While WD-40 does have some lubricating properties, it is not a good lubricant and should not be used for this purpose. Using it on anything that needs proper lubrication will not give you the results you want.

First, the WD-40 loosens rust and corrosion, which it actually does well. For a while, parts that you applied the product to will move smoother than they used to.

After the volatile compounds have evaporated, however, moving parts will start to seize up again. Crud, grime and particles start to accumulate on the leftover WD-40 and you will be in the same as or a worse position than you started. And that is why I would recommend against using WD-40 as a lubricant.
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by newday777 »

:
DenverWinger wrote: Fri Nov 11, 2022 9:55 am So which blinker fluid is better? Synthetic or Conventional?
Blinker Fluid.jpeg

Not trying to start a blinker fluid war..... :lol:
😭
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IdahoHacker
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by IdahoHacker »

In another life I'm an electronics hobbyist. The question of whether or not to use WD-40 on electrical components comes up all the time. The absolute best answer I've come across is this one:

"What's the difference between WD-40 and epoxy?"

"About six months."

Don't do it.
I may be growing older, but I refuse to grow up.
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Snowmoer
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by Snowmoer »

IdahoHacker wrote: Thu Dec 01, 2022 8:48 am In another life I'm an electronics hobbyist. The question of whether or not to use WD-40 on electrical components comes up all the time. The absolute best answer I've come across is this one:

"What's the difference between WD-40 and epoxy?"

"About six months."

Don't do it.
That is because a lot of the chemicals in WD 40 are also in furniture varnish! That is why it repels water. You are putting a very thin coat of varnish on whatever you sprayed it on. It is not from the very little oil that is in there.

I got this information from a master firearms gunsmith that I took an armorer class from. He was in the Marines and was testing how many continuous rounds it would take before the barrel needed to be changed out of a machine gun. They used WD 40 to spray on the firing bolt to keep it lubricated. It has oil in it. He said that a sticky goop formed from the WD 40 and the bolt froze up in the weapon. The bolt was frozen in place and could not be removed. The weapon had to be destroyed. It reminded him of varnish his dad used when he was a kid. He got the MSDS sheets out for both WD and furniture varnish. Sure enough, same chemicals.

I don't fall for the marketing hype from WD 40. You will not find any of it in my garage.
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by agedbikeman »

Being a retired radio and TV engineer of 40+ years experience, you cant beat "switch cleaner" that what us engineers use, as long as its called switch cleaner it's good to go, but the brand Servisol seemed to be the best, don't know if exists in the states, definitely in the UK. The best all round way is dismantle, clean and assemble with switch cleaner, grease always turns to treacle in switches.
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Re: Switch Lubrication.

Post by Solo So Long »

DenverWinger wrote: Fri Nov 11, 2022 9:55 am So which blinker fluid is better? Synthetic or Conventional?
Synthetic isn't worth the extra cost. When you spend too much on blinker fluid, it's just a flash in the pan.


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