How to winterize your motorcycle


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goldwinger5566
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2013 6:14 am
Location: Midland, Mi
Motorcycle: 1996 GL1500 SE

Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by goldwinger5566 » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:17 pm



Excellent article. I've had my 1996 GL1500 SE for 14 years and have never seen the steps laid out so succinctly. I have done many of the things listed to do and some of the things listed as definitely not to do! Thanks for the great advice.



Jambriwal
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2016 8:04 am
Location: Hamburg NY
Motorcycle: 2014 gl Valkyrie 1800 c

Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by Jambriwal » Sun Dec 03, 2017 5:57 pm

I just winterized my 2014 Valkyrie 1800. Changed oil, Filter and rear drive fluid. Also air up tires and filled tank with non Ethanol 91 octane fuel and treated it.
Then it goes in the shed and into it's pup tent. I bought a storage tent from Pep Boys a couple of years ago for less than $100.00. It has a vinyl florr and a soft cotton upper. I put desicant that you can buy at Dollar tree and check it after a month. If there is any water in the cup put a new on in.
Best part is if you put it away clean and dry it will be the same in the spring.

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Solina Dave
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Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by Solina Dave » Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:22 pm

WingAdmin wrote:
Sat Nov 29, 2014 7:08 pm
how-to-winterize-your-motorcycle-1.jpg

I don't drain the carburetors. Draining the carbs is an onerous and painful job. If I was going to be storing the bike for 6 months or so, I would very likely drain the carbs. However, when I am storing the bike for four months over the winter, and the carbs are full of a stew of Seafoam and Sta-Bil, they do just fine, and having used this method now for many years, it has never failed me. If your bike has a manual petcock, make sure to turn it off! If you do have a manual petcock, you can turn it off while the bike is running, and just wait until the engine dies. This ensures your carburetors have been drained of fuel. I use this method on things that are run very infrequently, like my generator.
WingAdmin,

I might be missing something. Wait, I'll re-phrase that. I'm probably missing something.
On one hand, I hear you saying that performing the onerous and painful job of manually draining the carbs, on a bike being stored for a relatively short period time (4 months give or take), in this case that would be my '78GL, is unnecessary because you've doped up the fuel with SeaFoam and Sta-Bil, and that would be sufficient. But then you go on to say that if you have a manually operated petcock you can close it with the engine running and drain the carbs in that manner. And that you use this method for your infrequently operated engines.
Are you suggesting that if you are bent on draining your carbs that could be a way of doing it? But it's your opinion that it's unnecessary to drain the carbs. Also, if one were to insist on doing so, what do they expect to gain? Has the appearance of products like SeaFoam and Marine Sta-Bil eliminated the necessity to drain the carbs. But if you feel you must do it, then go for it.

Thanks for the excellent writeup.....................Dave :?
"Assume Nothing"

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brettchallenger
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Location: Driffield, the East Riding of Yorkshire, England
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Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by brettchallenger » Sun Oct 21, 2018 2:09 am

The Honda instructions say to crank the engine with the stop switch set to OFF after an oil change, to distribute the fresh oil. This is a good idea, and works on most Wings - except later model GL1500's and GL1800's, which will refuse to crank if the stop switch is OFF. My 2000 GL1500 is one of those bikes, so I instead start it briefly (10 seconds or so) to ensure the oil is fully distributed throughout the engine.
An alternative method for distrubuting engine oil in late gl1500s is to press the starter button but ensure the choke is off. If it is cold when you do this, the engine shouldn't catch but just turn over - it might run for a second or two. Of course the plugs will be sparking but this is of no consequence.
Never trust a nation whose armed forces goose-step

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bstig60
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Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by bstig60 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:35 am

The 1800 is no different. Down here I can ride all winter. But when I lived in the foothills of NorCal, there were a couple of months when i Couldn't ride. Never done anything special to the bikes. Stored them on centerstand in a dry area and put the Battery Tender on for the duration.
Bill

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AZgl1800
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Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by AZgl1800 » Sun Oct 21, 2018 3:14 pm

bstig60 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:35 am
The 1800 is no different. Down here I can ride all winter. But when I lived in the foothills of NorCal, there were a couple of months when i Couldn't ride. Never done anything special to the bikes. Stored them on centerstand in a dry area and put the Battery Tender on for the duration.
me too.......... she is just on the center stand, Battery Tender engaged.
~John

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Oldbear
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Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by Oldbear » Mon Oct 22, 2018 7:59 am

WingAdmin wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:31 pm
jimduffenais wrote:
Fri Oct 28, 2016 11:35 pm
Thanks guys...Ive been asking around at work with the guys who ride and they are agreeing with your sediments as well. I had one gentleman who owns an 84 wing suggest that I not only put the bike on center stand to get the back wheel off the ground but to raise the front tire of the ground as well using a jack? He said he has done a few fork seal jobs and since he has been jcking it up off the ground completely(not sitting on wood and carpeting) he hasnt had to do the seals.

Ive never heard of having to get the front end in the air as well...just to ensure the wheels are'nt touching the concrete to avoid premature tire failure/aging.

You ever hear of this reason for the front jacking?
I don't think this is necessary. The amount of weight on the front wheel when the bike is on the center stand is negligible - I can actually lift the front wheel of my GL1500 off the ground when the bike is on the center stand. Compared to the 400 lbs that is usually resting on that wheel, it's tiny - and certainly not enough to create a flat spot.
This is my concern with my "new" bike. My Boulevard doesn't have a centre stand as my old Wing did. I think I'll lift and block the bike while I have it strapped into the big lift - I do miss the solid feel of the centre stand and the fact that my Wing was skinnier than the Bully when parked...
My wife is the greatest - she won't let me sell my bike - I'm less grumpy when I ride...

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Oldbear
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Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by Oldbear » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:04 am

Solina Dave wrote:
Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:22 pm
WingAdmin wrote:
Sat Nov 29, 2014 7:08 pm
how-to-winterize-your-motorcycle-1.jpg

I don't drain the carburetors. Draining the carbs is an onerous and painful job. If I was going to be storing the bike for 6 months or so, I would very likely drain the carbs. However, when I am storing the bike for four months over the winter, and the carbs are full of a stew of Seafoam and Sta-Bil, they do just fine, and having used this method now for many years, it has never failed me. If your bike has a manual petcock, make sure to turn it off! If you do have a manual petcock, you can turn it off while the bike is running, and just wait until the engine dies. This ensures your carburetors have been drained of fuel. I use this method on things that are run very infrequently, like my generator.
WingAdmin,

I might be missing something. Wait, I'll re-phrase that. I'm probably missing something.
On one hand, I hear you saying that performing the onerous and painful job of manually draining the carbs, on a bike being stored for a relatively short period time (4 months give or take), in this case that would be my '78GL, is unnecessary because you've doped up the fuel with SeaFoam and Sta-Bil, and that would be sufficient. But then you go on to say that if you have a manually operated petcock you can close it with the engine running and drain the carbs in that manner. And that you use this method for your infrequently operated engines.
Are you suggesting that if you are bent on draining your carbs that could be a way of doing it? But it's your opinion that it's unnecessary to drain the carbs. Also, if one were to insist on doing so, what do they expect to gain? Has the appearance of products like SeaFoam and Marine Sta-Bil eliminated the necessity to drain the carbs. But if you feel you must do it, then go for it.

Thanks for the excellent writeup.....................Dave :?
I put a good quality fuel storage additive like Sta-bil in my tank and then fill it to the top. Run the bike for a few minutes to get the mix into the carbs and turn it off - I've had the bike longer than I've had a heated garage - so I was worried about condensation in the past - now I just worry about my kids wanting on the bike...
My wife is the greatest - she won't let me sell my bike - I'm less grumpy when I ride...

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Oldbear
Posts: 301
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Location: Linden, Alberta, Canada
Motorcycle: 1983 GL1100A Aspencade

Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by Oldbear » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:05 am

AZgl1800 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 3:14 pm
bstig60 wrote:
Sun Oct 21, 2018 7:35 am
The 1800 is no different. Down here I can ride all winter. But when I lived in the foothills of NorCal, there were a couple of months when i Couldn't ride. Never done anything special to the bikes. Stored them on centerstand in a dry area and put the Battery Tender on for the duration.
me too.......... she is just on the center stand, Battery Tender engaged.
I often parked mine on the centre stand as it was more stable and narrower in the "hips" in my small garage.
My wife is the greatest - she won't let me sell my bike - I'm less grumpy when I ride...

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WingAdmin
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Re: How to winterize your motorcycle

Post by WingAdmin » Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:56 pm

On the GL1500, emptying the carburetors of fuel before putting the bike away for the winter is fairly easy. Not quite as easy as the four-cylinder bikes (run the engine, shut off the petcock), but still fairly easy.

On the bike just in front of the gas cap, you'll see the fuel petcock. The small rubber hose on the petcock supplies vacuum from the engine intake to the fuel petcock. This vacuum operates a diaphragm in the petcock that allows fuel to flow:


To empty the carburetors, we need the petcock to turn off while the engine is running. Simply remove this hose from the petcock. You will need to put your finger over the end of the hose to "plug" it, or else your engine will act as if there is a vacuum leak (which there will be), and will run very poorly.


Allow the engine to run until it runs out of gas, stumbles and dies. Start it up and let it die a couple more times until it won't start anymore. Now reconnect the hose to the petcock.

That's it! The carburetors are now empty, and ready for winter storage.



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